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dc.contributor.authorGeal, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-14T16:00:38Z
dc.date.available2018-03-14T16:00:38Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-13
dc.identifier.citationGeal, R. (2017). 'Psychoanalytic and cognitivist dramas in contemporary Science Fiction films'. Messengers From The Stars, 2 (2), pp 46-60.
dc.identifier.issn2183-7465
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621183
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by University of Lisbon in Messengers from the Stars on 13/03/2017, available online: http://messengersfromthestars.letras.ulisboa.pt/journal/archives/article/psychoanalytic-and-cognitivist-dramas-in-contemporary-science-fiction-films The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractContemporary Science Fiction films engage audiences in numerous dramatic ways. This diversity can problematize academic approaches to cinema which tend to encourage specific monolithic interpretations of film that stress certain dramatic contexts at the expense of others. A critic’s a priori suppositions may dictate the ways in which any given film is interpreted. In particular, the still unresolved conflict between psychoanalytic and cognitivist approaches to film (in which filmmakers and spectators are understood either as unconscious subjects of ideology, or as rational independent agents) means that there can be little agreement about film’s potential effects. This essay explores how recent Science Fiction films such as Godzilla (2014) and Terminator Genisys (2015) exploit both of these theoretical hermeneutic contexts. They manipulate, both consciously and unconsciously, dramatic pleasures that proponents of psychoanalysis and cognitivism traditionally think of as being mutually exclusive. They do this, furthermore, using the same filmmaking techniques in a symbiotic manner. As such, the Science Fiction blockbuster demonstrates the ways in which film can omnivorously utilise whichever aesthetic, ideological and dramatic tools are available to elicit diverse audience responses.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Lisbon
dc.relation.urlhttp://messengersfromthestars.letras.ulisboa.pt/journal/archives/article/psychoanalytic-and-cognitivist-dramas-in-contemporary-science-fiction-films
dc.subjectTheory
dc.subjectBlockbuster
dc.subjectSpectacle
dc.subjectPsychoanalysis
dc.subjectCognitivism
dc.titlePsychoanalytic and cognitivist dramas in contemporary Science Fiction films
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalMessengers From The Stars
dc.date.accepted2016-12-31
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW140318RG
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-03-14
dc.source.volume2
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage46
dc.source.endpage60
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T08:34:27Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-03-14T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractContemporary Science Fiction films engage audiences in numerous dramatic ways. This diversity can problematize academic approaches to cinema which tend to encourage specific monolithic interpretations of film that stress certain dramatic contexts at the expense of others. A critic’s a priori suppositions may dictate the ways in which any given film is interpreted. In particular, the still unresolved conflict between psychoanalytic and cognitivist approaches to film (in which filmmakers and spectators are understood either as unconscious subjects of ideology, or as rational independent agents) means that there can be little agreement about film’s potential effects. This essay explores how recent Science Fiction films such as Godzilla (2014) and Terminator Genisys (2015) exploit both of these theoretical hermeneutic contexts. They manipulate, both consciously and unconsciously, dramatic pleasures that proponents of psychoanalysis and cognitivism traditionally think of as being mutually exclusive. They do this, furthermore, using the same filmmaking techniques in a symbiotic manner. As such, the Science Fiction blockbuster demonstrates the ways in which film can omnivorously utilise whichever aesthetic, ideological and dramatic tools are available to elicit diverse audience responses.


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