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dc.contributor.authorBurns, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-27T11:53:17Z
dc.date.available2018-02-27T11:53:17Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.issn0040-0610
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621143
dc.description.abstractVisiting historical sites is a staple of secondary history education, with trips to castles, stately homes, working museums and industrial landscapes among the more popular day trips in the UK. Over the years, Teaching History has featured an array of articles outlining the benefits of local visits and how to build upon them: from learning about a local villain in Hackney at Sutton House, to a variety of thematic trips at Key Stage 3, including castles, museums and city street tours. Another range of articles have focused on overseas destinations, such as trips to the First World War battlefields or to sites commemorating the Holocaust. Although trips are often lauded by both students and teachers for providing a memorable and tangible experience of history, they are often optional, and subject to time, curriculum and financial restraints.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Historical Association, London
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.history.org.uk/publications/resource/9300/hosting-teacher-development-at-historical-sites-t
dc.subjectTeaching
dc.subjectHistorical Sites
dc.subjectHistory Education
dc.subjectTeacher Development
dc.titleHosting teacher development at historical sites: the benefits for classroom teaching
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalTeaching History
dc.date.accepted2017-12
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW270218AB
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2023-02-14
dc.source.volume169
dc.source.issueDecember
dc.source.beginpage36
dc.source.endpage43
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:05:57Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractVisiting historical sites is a staple of secondary history education, with trips to castles, stately homes, working museums and industrial landscapes among the more popular day trips in the UK. Over the years, Teaching History has featured an array of articles outlining the benefits of local visits and how to build upon them: from learning about a local villain in Hackney at Sutton House, to a variety of thematic trips at Key Stage 3, including castles, museums and city street tours. Another range of articles have focused on overseas destinations, such as trips to the First World War battlefields or to sites commemorating the Holocaust. Although trips are often lauded by both students and teachers for providing a memorable and tangible experience of history, they are often optional, and subject to time, curriculum and financial restraints.


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