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dc.contributor.authorAltintzoglou, Evripidis
dc.contributor.authorFredriksson, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-22T11:22:15Z
dc.date.available2018-02-22T11:22:15Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn9781848884564
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621127
dc.description.abstractIn the wake of the Arab Spring, Time Magazine named ‘The Protester’, 2011s Person of the Year. Revolts, social unrest and demands for systemic change continue to spread from the anti-austerity street marches in Europe and the progressive ‘No Borders’ global movement, to protests against neoconservative and xenophobic populist movements. Histories are currently being (re)written and the immanence and promise of large scale political revolutions is as present today as ever on our planet. As the goals and aspirations of protesters across the world become more heterogeneous and less programmatic, it becomes increasingly hard to say what ‘the protester’ wants and where ‘the revolution’ will take us. This book embraces the ambiguity and heterogeneity of contemporary protest movements, pointing to how the potentials of revolutionary acts reside behind seemingly irrelevant, disorganized outbursts of apparently aimless acts. Giving meaning to the sign carried by a protester of the Occupy Wall Street demonstration: ‘We’re here; we’re unclear; get used to it’.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInter-Disciplinary Press
dc.subjectrevolt
dc.subjectrevolution
dc.subjectriots
dc.subjectpolitical
dc.subjectradical
dc.subjecthistory
dc.subjectcultural
dc.subjecttheory
dc.subjectoccupy
dc.titleRevolt and Revolution: The Protester in the 21st Century
dc.typeBook
html.description.abstractIn the wake of the Arab Spring, Time Magazine named ‘The Protester’, 2011s Person of the Year. Revolts, social unrest and demands for systemic change continue to spread from the anti-austerity street marches in Europe and the progressive ‘No Borders’ global movement, to protests against neoconservative and xenophobic populist movements. Histories are currently being (re)written and the immanence and promise of large scale political revolutions is as present today as ever on our planet. As the goals and aspirations of protesters across the world become more heterogeneous and less programmatic, it becomes increasingly hard to say what ‘the protester’ wants and where ‘the revolution’ will take us. This book embraces the ambiguity and heterogeneity of contemporary protest movements, pointing to how the potentials of revolutionary acts reside behind seemingly irrelevant, disorganized outbursts of apparently aimless acts. Giving meaning to the sign carried by a protester of the Occupy Wall Street demonstration: ‘We’re here; we’re unclear; get used to it’.


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