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dc.contributor.authorByrne, Aidan
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Samantha
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-15T14:39:24Z
dc.date.available2018-02-15T14:39:24Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.identifier.issn0022-3840
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jpcu.12680
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621115
dc.description.abstractFiction by fans is not new: despite the development of copyright law in the eighteenth century, unofficial sequels were common. For example, Samuel Richardson’s Pamela (1740) was followed by anonymous and pseudonymous sequels and satires, including Pamela’s Conduct in High Life (1741) and Conny Keyber’s (Henry Fielding’s) An Apology for the Life of Mrs Shamela Andrews (1741). The commercial publishing world still produces such work: Jane Austen sequels and retellings include Arielle Eckstut’s Pride and Promiscuity: The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen, Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2009), Mitzi Szereto’s Pride and Prejudice: Hidden Lusts (2011), P. D. James’s Death Comes To Pemberley (2011), Jo Baker’s Longbourn (2014), Val McDermid’s Northanger Abbey (2015), and Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible (2016). The market recognizes and legitimizes consumer demand for derivative fiction.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley Blackwell
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1540-5931
dc.subjectfan fiction
dc.subjectcultural studies
dc.subjectliterary studies
dc.subjecterotica
dc.subjectpornography
dc.subjectpopular culture
dc.subjectneoliberalism
dc.titleSex sells (out): Neoliberalism and erotic fan fiction
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Popular Culture
dc.date.accepted2018-02-01
rioxxterms.funderInternal
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW150218AB
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-08-01
dc.source.volume51
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage693
dc.source.endpage715
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T08:32:40Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractFiction by fans is not new: despite the development of copyright law in the eighteenth century, unofficial sequels were common. For example, Samuel Richardson’s Pamela (1740) was followed by anonymous and pseudonymous sequels and satires, including Pamela’s Conduct in High Life (1741) and Conny Keyber’s (Henry Fielding’s) An Apology for the Life of Mrs Shamela Andrews (1741). The commercial publishing world still produces such work: Jane Austen sequels and retellings include Arielle Eckstut’s Pride and Promiscuity: The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen, Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2009), Mitzi Szereto’s Pride and Prejudice: Hidden Lusts (2011), P. D. James’s Death Comes To Pemberley (2011), Jo Baker’s Longbourn (2014), Val McDermid’s Northanger Abbey (2015), and Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible (2016). The market recognizes and legitimizes consumer demand for derivative fiction.


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