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dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Hana
dc.contributor.authorBall, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T15:36:12Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T15:36:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-31
dc.identifier.citationMorrissey, H., Ball, P. (2016) 'Education case study reports reflection on teaching strategies for pharmacy students', Pharmacy Education, 16 (1) 112 - 117
dc.identifier.issn1560-2214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621071
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Teaching should meet the needs of all types of learner present in the class room; the activist, the reflector, the theorist and the pragmatist who also have diverse backgrounds, levels of education and are from different age groups. Aim: The aim of the four projects was to improve students’ engagement and success. Method: New teaching strategies were trialled to improve students’ engagement and successes with topics which according to their feedback were considered ‘dry’. The author utilised techniques such as flipping the class-room, simulation, case or problem based learning; and group work replacing traditional lectures. First, third and fourth year students were asked to prepare for the in-class activities at home using the lectures or simulation software. Results: The strategies were effective in a small class size of 15-20 students, with improved attendance and participation, improved fail/pass rate and number of students achieving credit or pass; however there was no significant change in the number of students achieving high distinction or distinction. Evaluation: Reproducibility is an important part of the experiment to demonstrate that the results can be trusted. Success with one or two cohorts is not sufficient to adopt a method of teaching. Ongoing evaluation is essential to eliminate cohort-related effects prior to implementation. It is not clear if the achieved results would be achievable in larger classes due to the reduction in student: lecturer ratio and limitation of class room time to allow all students to participate.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFIP
dc.relation.urlhttp://pharmacyeducation.fip.org/pharmacyeducation/article/view/432
dc.subjectSimulation
dc.subjectFlipping the Classroom
dc.subjectPharmacokinetics
dc.subjectClean Room
dc.subjectPalliative Care
dc.subjectPeer Review
dc.titleEducation case study reports reflection on teaching strategies for pharmacy students
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalPharmacy Education
dc.date.accepted2017-12-31
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW010218HM
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-12-01
dc.source.volume16
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage112
dc.source.endpage117
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:28:38Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractIntroduction: Teaching should meet the needs of all types of learner present in the class room; the activist, the reflector, the theorist and the pragmatist who also have diverse backgrounds, levels of education and are from different age groups. Aim: The aim of the four projects was to improve students’ engagement and success. Method: New teaching strategies were trialled to improve students’ engagement and successes with topics which according to their feedback were considered ‘dry’. The author utilised techniques such as flipping the class-room, simulation, case or problem based learning; and group work replacing traditional lectures. First, third and fourth year students were asked to prepare for the in-class activities at home using the lectures or simulation software. Results: The strategies were effective in a small class size of 15-20 students, with improved attendance and participation, improved fail/pass rate and number of students achieving credit or pass; however there was no significant change in the number of students achieving high distinction or distinction. Evaluation: Reproducibility is an important part of the experiment to demonstrate that the results can be trusted. Success with one or two cohorts is not sufficient to adopt a method of teaching. Ongoing evaluation is essential to eliminate cohort-related effects prior to implementation. It is not clear if the achieved results would be achievable in larger classes due to the reduction in student: lecturer ratio and limitation of class room time to allow all students to participate.


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