Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-09T10:16:17Z
dc.date.available2018-01-09T10:16:17Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-15
dc.identifier.citationMercer, T. (2018). Retroactive Interference in Visual Short-Term Memory. Experimental Psychology, 65 (3), pp 139–148. 10.1027/1618-3169/a000401
dc.identifier.issn1618-3169
dc.identifier.doi10.1027/1618-3169/a000401
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621030
dc.descriptionThis article does not exactly replicate the final version published in the journal "Experimental Psychology". It is not a copy of the original published article and is not suitable for citation.
dc.description.abstractRetroactive interference occurs when new information disrupts the retention of an existing representation, but its effects on visual short-term memory remain poorly understood. The present study examined three factors predicted to influence domain-specific retroactive interference, including the type of distractor, its temporal position and the length of the retention interval. Participants compared target and test objects over a brief interval that either was unfilled or contained a similar or dissimilar distractor occurring 200 ms or 1.5 s after the target offset. Retention was influenced by the temporal position of the distractor and its relationship with the to-be-remembered target. Specifically, retroactive interference was only observed following the presentation of a dissimilar distractor that occurred 1.5 s after the target. These results suggest that novel distractors may be particularly interfering.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherHogrefe
dc.relation.urlhttps://econtent.hogrefe.com/doi/abs/10.1027/1618-3169/a000401
dc.subjectRetroactive interference
dc.subjectvisual short-term memory
dc.subjectforgetting
dc.subjectconsolidation
dc.titleRetroactive interference in visual short-term memory
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalExperimental Psychology
dc.date.accepted2018-01-18
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.project090118TM
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01-18
dc.source.volume65
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage139
dc.source.endpage148
refterms.dateFCD2018-09-14T09:31:45Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-18T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractRetroactive interference occurs when new information disrupts the retention of an existing representation, but its effects on visual short-term memory remain poorly understood. The present study examined three factors predicted to influence domain-specific retroactive interference, including the type of distractor, its temporal position and the length of the retention interval. Participants compared target and test objects over a brief interval that either was unfilled or contained a similar or dissimilar distractor occurring 200 ms or 1.5 s after the target offset. Retention was influenced by the temporal position of the distractor and its relationship with the to-be-remembered target. Specifically, retroactive interference was only observed following the presentation of a dissimilar distractor that occurred 1.5 s after the target. These results suggest that novel distractors may be particularly interfering.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Mercer_Retroactive_interferenc ...
Size:
509.6Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0