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dc.contributor.authorSalia, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Javed
dc.contributor.authorTingbani, Ishmael
dc.contributor.authorKolade, Oluwaseun
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T15:04:23Z
dc.date.available2017-11-21T15:04:23Z
dc.date.issued2017-11
dc.identifier.citationSamuel Salia, Javed Hussain, Ishmael Tingbani, Oluwaseun Kolade, (2017) "Is women empowerment a zero sum game? Unintended consequences of microfinance for women’s empowerment in Ghana", International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, https://doi.org/10.1108/IJEBR-04-2017-0114
dc.identifier.issn1355-2554
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/IJEBR-04-2017-0114
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620880
dc.description.abstractPurpose – Against the background of growing concerns that development interventions can sometimes be a zero sum game, the purpose of this paper is to examine the unintended consequences of microfinance for women empowerment in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach – The study employs a participatory mixed-method approach including household questionnaire surveys, focus group discussions and key informant interviews to investigate the dynamics of microfinance effects on women in communities of different vulnerability status in Ghana. Findings – The results of hierarchical regression, triadic closure and thematic analyses demonstrate that the economic benefits of microfinance for women is also directly associated with conflicts amongst spouses, girl child labour, polygyny and the neglect of perceived female domestic responsibilities due to women’s devotion to their enterprises. Originality/value – In the light of limited empirical evidence on potentially negative impacts of women empowerment interventions in Africa, this paper fills a critical gap in knowledge that will enable NGOs, policy makers and other stakeholders to design and implement more effective interventions that mitigate undesirable consequences.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEmerald Insight
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/IJEBR-04-2017-0114
dc.subjectMicrofinance
dc.subjectWomen Empowerment
dc.subjectUnintended Consequences
dc.subjectGhana
dc.titleIs women empowerment a zero sum game? Unintended consequences of microfinance for women’s empowerment in Ghana
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research
dc.date.accepted2017-08
rioxxterms.funderInternal
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW21117SS
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-11-21
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-18T15:47:00Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-14T12:57:38Z
html.description.abstractPurpose – Against the background of growing concerns that development interventions can sometimes be a zero sum game, the purpose of this paper is to examine the unintended consequences of microfinance for women empowerment in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach – The study employs a participatory mixed-method approach including household questionnaire surveys, focus group discussions and key informant interviews to investigate the dynamics of microfinance effects on women in communities of different vulnerability status in Ghana. Findings – The results of hierarchical regression, triadic closure and thematic analyses demonstrate that the economic benefits of microfinance for women is also directly associated with conflicts amongst spouses, girl child labour, polygyny and the neglect of perceived female domestic responsibilities due to women’s devotion to their enterprises. Originality/value – In the light of limited empirical evidence on potentially negative impacts of women empowerment interventions in Africa, this paper fills a critical gap in knowledge that will enable NGOs, policy makers and other stakeholders to design and implement more effective interventions that mitigate undesirable consequences.


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