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dc.contributor.authorGeorgakouli, Kalliopi
dc.contributor.authorManthou, Eirini
dc.contributor.authorGeorgoulias, Panagiotis
dc.contributor.authorZiaka, Anastasia
dc.contributor.authorFatouros, Ioannis G
dc.contributor.authorMastorakos, Georgios
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannis
dc.contributor.authorTheodorakis, Yannis
dc.contributor.authorJamurtas, Athanasios Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-12T13:21:59Z
dc.date.available2017-10-12T13:21:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-01
dc.identifier.citation(2017) 'Exercise training reduces alcohol consumption but does not affect HPA-axis activity in heavy drinkers', Physiology & Behavior, 179, pp. 276-283
dc.identifier.issn0031-9384
dc.identifier.pmid28684134
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.07.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620761
dc.description.abstractIt has been suggested that physical exercise could have potential beneficial effects in substance abusers, which are based on both physiological and psychological theories. Although a few studies have examined the effect of exercise on alcohol intake and fitness in individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), there is a gap in the literature concerning the physiological and biochemical mechanisms that could be affected by physical exercise in this population.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectAlcohol cessation
dc.subjectAlcohol use disorders
dc.subjectHPA-axis
dc.subjectOpioid system
dc.subjectOpioid system
dc.subjectβ-endorphin
dc.titleExercise training reduces alcohol consumption but does not affect HPA-axis activity in heavy drinkers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalPhysiology & Behavior
dc.date.accepted2017-07-03
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW121017YK3
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07-03
dc.source.volume179
dc.source.beginpage276
dc.source.endpage283
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T08:41:03Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-03T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractIt has been suggested that physical exercise could have potential beneficial effects in substance abusers, which are based on both physiological and psychological theories. Although a few studies have examined the effect of exercise on alcohol intake and fitness in individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), there is a gap in the literature concerning the physiological and biochemical mechanisms that could be affected by physical exercise in this population.


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