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dc.contributor.authorDickins, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-10T14:00:37Z
dc.date.available2017-10-10T14:00:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-31
dc.identifier.citationDickins, T. (2017) “Folk-Spectrum Music as an Expression of Alterity in ‘Normalization’ Czechoslovakia (1969–89): Context, Constraints and Characteristics.” The Slavonic and East European Review, 95 (4) pp. 648–690
dc.identifier.issn0037-6795
dc.identifier.doi10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.95.4.0648
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620744
dc.description.abstractThis article seeks to evaluate the challenge posed by folk, country and tramping music to the Communist authorities in ‘normalization’ Czechoslovakia (1969–89) and the measures taken to limit their impact. It outlines the traditions and the historical context of folk-spectrum music, considers the reception of songs by the authorities and the constraints that were imposed upon their performers, analyses the defining characteristics of the compositions — focusing on lexical repetition and the use of recurrent themes and motifs in the creation, exploration and celebration of realities outside the officially promoted discourse of the time — and evaluates and exemplifies the use of colloquial language as a means of expressing informality and intimacy. The study concludes that, although it is impossible to quantify the effects of the music on the approved authoritative discourse, on balance, the folk-spectrum phenomenon was an unwelcome distraction to the Communist regime.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherModern Humanities Research Association
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.95.4.0648?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
dc.subjectCzech music
dc.subjectCzech folk
dc.subjectCzech tramping
dc.subjectCzech country
dc.subjectCzech language
dc.subjectCzech culture
dc.subject'normalization' Czechoslovakia
dc.subjectCzech cultural resisistance
dc.subjectCzechoslovak Communism
dc.titleFolk-spectrum music as an expression of alterity in ‘normalization’ Czechoslovakia (1969–89): Context, constraints and characteristics
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalSlavonic and East European Review
dc.date.accepted2017-09-11
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW101017TD
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-10-01
dc.source.volume95
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage648
dc.source.endpage690
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T08:32:40Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThis article seeks to evaluate the challenge posed by folk, country and tramping music to the Communist authorities in ‘normalization’ Czechoslovakia (1969–89) and the measures taken to limit their impact. It outlines the traditions and the historical context of folk-spectrum music, considers the reception of songs by the authorities and the constraints that were imposed upon their performers, analyses the defining characteristics of the compositions — focusing on lexical repetition and the use of recurrent themes and motifs in the creation, exploration and celebration of realities outside the officially promoted discourse of the time — and evaluates and exemplifies the use of colloquial language as a means of expressing informality and intimacy. The study concludes that, although it is impossible to quantify the effects of the music on the approved authoritative discourse, on balance, the folk-spectrum phenomenon was an unwelcome distraction to the Communist regime.


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