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dc.contributor.authorSheffield, Gary
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T14:27:20Z
dc.date.available2017-08-08T14:27:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-01
dc.identifier.citationSheffield, G. (2017) 'Shaping British and Anzac Soldiers’ Experience of Gallipoli: Environmental and Medical Factors, and the Development of Trench Warfare', British Journal for Military History, 4, (1) pp. 23–43
dc.identifier.issn2057-0422
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620571
dc.description.abstractWorks discussing the experience of combatants, based on their writings or on oral testimony, are a well-established genre of military history. However, it is rare to find authors explicitly analysing the various influences that shaped the soldier’s experience in any era. This article, which forms part of a wider study of British and Dominion soldiers in the two world wars, attempts to fill this gap by using the Gallipoli campaign as a vehicle to examine some of the factors that shaped the experience of British, Australian and New Zealand soldiers that served at the Dardanelles. Here, ‘experience’ is defined as ‘the process or an instance of undergoing and being affected by an event or a series of connected events’. Such an exploration helps to reveal the extent to which individuals in war have ‘agency’, the ability to determine their own fate, or are limited by external factors (in sociological terms, ‘structural constraints’). Such external factors could stem from apparently trivial things, which nevertheless determined a man’s fate. In September 1914 Philip Ibbetson and his mate Jack tried to join the Royal Australian Navy in Brisbane, but Jack was rejected because of hammer toes. Both men then enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), which was evidently less fussy about recruits’ feet. They eventually found themselves at Gallipoli, rather than experiencing a rather different war at sea. In their case, agency was noticeably absent.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBritish Journal for Military History
dc.relation.urlhttps://bjmh.org.uk/index.php/bjmh/article/view/193/0
dc.subjectGallipoli
dc.subjectsoldiers' experience
dc.subjectBritish
dc.subjectAnzac Soldiers’
dc.subjectEnvironmental and Medical Factors
dc.subjectTrench Warfare
dc.titleShaping British and Anzac soldiers’ experience of Gallipoli: environmental and medical factors, and the development of trench warfare
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal for Military History
dc.date.accepted2017-07-31
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW080817GS
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-08
dc.source.volume4
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage23
dc.source.endpage43
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-18T15:47:00Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2017-08-08T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractWorks discussing the experience of combatants, based on their writings or on oral testimony, are a well-established genre of military history. However, it is rare to find authors explicitly analysing the various influences that shaped the soldier’s experience in any era. This article, which forms part of a wider study of British and Dominion soldiers in the two world wars, attempts to fill this gap by using the Gallipoli campaign as a vehicle to examine some of the factors that shaped the experience of British, Australian and New Zealand soldiers that served at the Dardanelles. Here, ‘experience’ is defined as ‘the process or an instance of undergoing and being affected by an event or a series of connected events’. Such an exploration helps to reveal the extent to which individuals in war have ‘agency’, the ability to determine their own fate, or are limited by external factors (in sociological terms, ‘structural constraints’). Such external factors could stem from apparently trivial things, which nevertheless determined a man’s fate. In September 1914 Philip Ibbetson and his mate Jack tried to join the Royal Australian Navy in Brisbane, but Jack was rejected because of hammer toes. Both men then enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), which was evidently less fussy about recruits’ feet. They eventually found themselves at Gallipoli, rather than experiencing a rather different war at sea. In their case, agency was noticeably absent.


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