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dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorLahart, Ian M
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Paul
dc.contributor.authorRamirez-Velez, Robinson
dc.contributor.authorSandercock, Gavin
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-28T13:06:31Z
dc.date.available2017-07-28T13:06:31Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-12
dc.identifier.citationNevill AM., Duncan MJ., Lahart IM., Davies P., Ramirez-Velez R., Sandercock G. (2017) 'Scaling children's waist circumference for differences in body size', American Journal of Human Biology, 29 (6) doi: 10.1002/ajhb.23037
dc.identifier.issn1042-0533
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajhb.23037
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620565
dc.description.abstractObjectives Both waist circumference (WC) and body size (height) increase with age throughout childhood. Hence, there is a need to scale WC in children to detect differences in adiposity status (eg, between populations and different age groups), independent of body size/height. Methods Using two culturally different samples, 1 English (10–15.9 years n = 9471) and 2 Colombian (14–15 years, n = 37,948), for WC to be independent of height (HT), a body shape index was obtained using the allometric power law WC = a.HTb. The model was linearized using log-transformation, and multiple regression/ANCOVA to estimate the height exponents for WC controlling for age, sex, and any other categorical/population differences. Results In both samples, the power-law height exponent varied systematically with age. In younger children (age 10–11 years), the exponent was approximately unity, suggesting that pre-pubertal children might be geometrically similar. In older children, the height exponent declined monotonically to 0.5 (ie, HT0.5) in 15+ year-olds, similar to the exponent observed in adults. UK children's height-adjusted WC revealed a “u” shaped curve with age that appeared to reach a minimum at peak-height velocity, different for boys and girls. Comparing the WC of two populations (UK versus Colombian 14–15-year-old children) identified that the gap in WC between the countries narrowed considerably after scaling for height. Conclusions Scaling children's WC for differences in height using allometric modeling reveals new insights into the growth and development of children's WC, findings that might well have been be overlooked if body size/height had been ignored.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ajhb.23037
dc.subjectAllometric scaling
dc.subjectwaist circumference
dc.subjectchildren
dc.titleScaling children's waist circumference for differences in body size
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education; Health and Wellbeing, University of Wolverhampton; Walsall Campus Walsall United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Health and Life Sciences; Coventry University; Coventry United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education; Health and Wellbeing, University of Wolverhampton; Walsall Campus Walsall United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education; Health and Wellbeing, University of Wolverhampton; Walsall Campus Walsall United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionCentro de Estudios en Medición de la Actividad Física (CEMA), Universidad del Rosario; Bogotá Cundinamarca Colombia
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Biological Sciences; University of Essex; Colchester United Kingdom
dc.date.accepted2017-06-13
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW280717IL
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07-12
dc.source.volume29
dc.source.issue6
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:01:27Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-12T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractObjectives Both waist circumference (WC) and body size (height) increase with age throughout childhood. Hence, there is a need to scale WC in children to detect differences in adiposity status (eg, between populations and different age groups), independent of body size/height. Methods Using two culturally different samples, 1 English (10–15.9 years n = 9471) and 2 Colombian (14–15 years, n = 37,948), for WC to be independent of height (HT), a body shape index was obtained using the allometric power law WC = a.HTb. The model was linearized using log-transformation, and multiple regression/ANCOVA to estimate the height exponents for WC controlling for age, sex, and any other categorical/population differences. Results In both samples, the power-law height exponent varied systematically with age. In younger children (age 10–11 years), the exponent was approximately unity, suggesting that pre-pubertal children might be geometrically similar. In older children, the height exponent declined monotonically to 0.5 (ie, HT0.5) in 15+ year-olds, similar to the exponent observed in adults. UK children's height-adjusted WC revealed a “u” shaped curve with age that appeared to reach a minimum at peak-height velocity, different for boys and girls. Comparing the WC of two populations (UK versus Colombian 14–15-year-old children) identified that the gap in WC between the countries narrowed considerably after scaling for height. Conclusions Scaling children's WC for differences in height using allometric modeling reveals new insights into the growth and development of children's WC, findings that might well have been be overlooked if body size/height had been ignored.


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