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dc.contributor.authorFullwood, Chris
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Sally
dc.contributor.authorKaye, Linda K.
dc.contributor.authorRedding, Charlotte
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-26T14:17:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-26T14:17:04Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-21
dc.identifier.citationFullwood, C. et al. (2018) My Virtual friend: A qualitative analysis of the attitudes and experiences of Smartphone users: Implications for Smartphone attachment, Computers in Human Behavior, 75(october 2017), pp. 347-355.
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.029
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620492
dc.description.abstractAs mobile phones have evolved into Smartphones, they have become more than simple communication tools; transforming into personal assistants, entertainment devices and information gateways. There is a need to understand how this rapid transformation and complexity of Smartphone uses have impacted on users’ relationship with their phones. This study presents a thematic analysis of three focus group discussions around attitudes and experiences of owning and using Smartphones. Themes that emerged included a bifurcation in attitudes to Smartphones as simultaneously materialistic objects, and ones which users express anthropomorphic and sentimental views about. Participant accounts reflected the evolution of Smartphones from functional communication devices, to informational and recreational tools. Participants discussed using Smartphones to alleviate boredom and that device usage had become habituated for some users. However, context determined Smartphone use with some participants using them to feel secure while away from familiar settings. Participant accounts provide rich insights into different Smartphones uses and infer numerous implications for understanding why some users develop strong psychological attachments to them. Findings also imply that users may not be attached to the device itself, but rather the affordances on offer. The implications of these findings, for example in the assessment of Smartphone addiction, are discussed.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0747563217303412
dc.subjectSmartphones
dc.subjectfocus group
dc.subjectthematic analysis
dc.subjectattitudes
dc.subjectexperiences
dc.subjectattachment
dc.titleMy Virtual friend: A qualitative analysis of the attitudes and experiences of Smartphone users: Implications for Smartphone attachment
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalComputers in Human Behavior
dc.date.accepted2017-05-21
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW260517CF
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-05-21
dc.source.volume75
dc.source.issue2017 October
dc.source.beginpage347
dc.source.endpage355
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:10:47Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-30T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAs mobile phones have evolved into Smartphones, they have become more than simple communication tools; transforming into personal assistants, entertainment devices and information gateways. There is a need to understand how this rapid transformation and complexity of Smartphone uses have impacted on users’ relationship with their phones. This study presents a thematic analysis of three focus group discussions around attitudes and experiences of owning and using Smartphones. Themes that emerged included a bifurcation in attitudes to Smartphones as simultaneously materialistic objects, and ones which users express anthropomorphic and sentimental views about. Participant accounts reflected the evolution of Smartphones from functional communication devices, to informational and recreational tools. Participants discussed using Smartphones to alleviate boredom and that device usage had become habituated for some users. However, context determined Smartphone use with some participants using them to feel secure while away from familiar settings. Participant accounts provide rich insights into different Smartphones uses and infer numerous implications for understanding why some users develop strong psychological attachments to them. Findings also imply that users may not be attached to the device itself, but rather the affordances on offer. The implications of these findings, for example in the assessment of Smartphone addiction, are discussed.


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