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dc.contributor.authorDalgleish, Mat
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-10T14:16:38Z
dc.date.available2017-05-10T14:16:38Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-01
dc.identifier.citationDalgleish, M. (2017) LOOP: A circular ferric memory in slow decline, Leonardo Music Journal, 27, pp. 49–50. DOI: 10.1162/LMJ_a_01011en
dc.identifier.issn0961-1215
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/LMJ_a_01011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620469
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by MIT Press in Leonardo Music Journal on 01/12/2017, available online: https://doi.org/10.1162/LMJ_a_01011 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractThe author describes the manipulation of time and memory in LOOP, a tape-based sound installation started in 2004. Many of my artworks are hybrid assemblages of obsolete and contemporary technology. The use of the obsolete is most immediately apparent in LOOP, a long-running (2004-present) sound installation built out of a Fostex X-34 four track recorder and C90 cassette tape. The Fostex X-34 is in many ways unexceptional: its sound and build quality are adequate at best. Indeed, most notable is perhaps that, by the time of its release in April 2000, it was arguably already rendered obsolete by the rise of MiniDisc recorders and audio-capable home computers. Nevertheless, the X-34 fitted the modest budget of a Birmingham schoolboy, and I acquired a lightly used and moderately discounted ex-demo unit about three months after its launch. The accessibility of the cassette tape was also key: while its popularity had significantly diminished after its late 1980s peak, blank tapes remained readily locally available.
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.publisherMIT Press
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/LMJ_a_01011
dc.subjecttape
dc.subjectsonic art
dc.subjectsound art
dc.subjectobsolescence
dc.subjectmemory
dc.titleLoop: A Circular Ferric Memory in Slow Decline
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalLeonardo Music Journal
dc.date.accepted2017-04-30
rioxxterms.funderJisc
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW100517MD
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-01
dc.source.volume27
dc.source.beginpage49
dc.source.endpage50
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T08:32:40Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2017-12-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThe author describes the manipulation of time and memory in LOOP, a tape-based sound installation started in 2004. Many of my artworks are hybrid assemblages of obsolete and contemporary technology. The use of the obsolete is most immediately apparent in LOOP, a long-running (2004-present) sound installation built out of a Fostex X-34 four track recorder and C90 cassette tape. The Fostex X-34 is in many ways unexceptional: its sound and build quality are adequate at best. Indeed, most notable is perhaps that, by the time of its release in April 2000, it was arguably already rendered obsolete by the rise of MiniDisc recorders and audio-capable home computers. Nevertheless, the X-34 fitted the modest budget of a Birmingham schoolboy, and I acquired a lightly used and moderately discounted ex-demo unit about three months after its launch. The accessibility of the cassette tape was also key: while its popularity had significantly diminished after its late 1980s peak, blank tapes remained readily locally available.


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