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dc.contributor.authorArjunan, Arun
dc.contributor.authorStanford, Mark
dc.contributor.authorRackley, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T14:19:53Z
dc.date.available2017-04-05T14:19:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.isbn9783939296119
dc.identifier.issn0105-175x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620440
dc.description.abstractThe European directives on noise reduction associated with rail, road and aviation clearly depicts the need for high efficiency sound attenuating structures for targeted noise reduction. Consequently, this paper presents key observations from Phase 1 of the UK Department of Transport (DfT) funded research project to investigate the targeted creation of acoustic interference to develop high-efficiency noise abatement structures. Geometrical cavity inspired from existing theories around Herschel-Quincke concept is experimentally investigated for the creation of frequency dependent acoustic interference. The interference cavity within a global structure was digitally conceived and prototyped using the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process in a Nylon 12 material. A modified impedance tube method was then used to measure the frequency dependent Sound Reduction Index (R) for a frequency range of 250 to 1600 Hz. The results showed that depending on the frequency of interest acoustic interference can be recreated by controlling the cavity length. In addition R values of 72.47 dB were observed at 900 Hz confirming the potential of the technology for high efficiency noise barriers. The observation presented in this paper establishes a new viewpoint for the use of acoustic interference for targeted noise abatement.
dc.description.sponsorshipUK Department of Transport (Transport-Technology, Research and Innovation Grant)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGerman Acoustical Society (DEGA)
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.internoise2016.org/
dc.subjectSound
dc.subjectInsulation
dc.subjectInterference
dc.subjectTransmission Loss
dc.titleExperimental Investigation on the Sound Reduction Performance of Frequency Controlled Acoustic Interference Cavities
dc.typeConference contribution
dc.identifier.journalINTER-NOISE 2016 (ISSN 0105-175x)
dc.date.accepted2016-04
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.project150902 T-TRIG 2015
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-04-05
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:28:38Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2017-04-05T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThe European directives on noise reduction associated with rail, road and aviation clearly depicts the need for high efficiency sound attenuating structures for targeted noise reduction. Consequently, this paper presents key observations from Phase 1 of the UK Department of Transport (DfT) funded research project to investigate the targeted creation of acoustic interference to develop high-efficiency noise abatement structures. Geometrical cavity inspired from existing theories around Herschel-Quincke concept is experimentally investigated for the creation of frequency dependent acoustic interference. The interference cavity within a global structure was digitally conceived and prototyped using the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process in a Nylon 12 material. A modified impedance tube method was then used to measure the frequency dependent Sound Reduction Index (R) for a frequency range of 250 to 1600 Hz. The results showed that depending on the frequency of interest acoustic interference can be recreated by controlling the cavity length. In addition R values of 72.47 dB were observed at 900 Hz confirming the potential of the technology for high efficiency noise barriers. The observation presented in this paper establishes a new viewpoint for the use of acoustic interference for targeted noise abatement.


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