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dc.contributor.authorHinton, Danny
dc.contributor.authorStevens-Gill, Debbie
dc.contributor.editorAttrill, Alison
dc.contributor.editorFullwood, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-22T15:32:55Z
dc.date.available2017-03-22T15:32:55Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationIn: Attrill, A., Fullwood, C. (Eds.), Applied Cyberpsychology Practical Applications of Cyberpsychological Theory and Research:pp236-255
dc.identifier.isbn9781137517036
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620426
dc.description.abstractAt its core, the field of psychometrics is concerned with the measurement of psychological constructs. The term psychometric is derived from the ancient Greek words ψυχικός (“of the soul”; “of life”) and μέτρησις (“measurement”), and describes a group of methods by which a psychologist can measure a test taker’s cognitive ability, personality, attitudes, interests, or other psychological characteristics relevant to a wide variety of therapeutic, occupational, educational, and forensic settings. These measurements are based on the test taker’s responses to a series of questions and statements, known as items, traditionally administered using a pencil-and-paper system of question booklets and answer sheets. Within practitioner circles (as is the case in this chapter), “psychometrics,” “psychological assessment,” and “psychological measurement” are terms that are used interchangeably (Coaley, 2014).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.palgrave.com/gb/book/9781137517029
dc.subjectPsychometrics
dc.subjectCyberpsychology
dc.subjectCognitive Ability
dc.subjectPersonality
dc.titleApplied Cyberpsychology: Practical Applications of Cyberpsychological Theory and Research
dc.typeChapter in book
pubs.edition1
pubs.place-of-publicationMacmillan Building, London
dc.source.beginpageXVII
dc.source.endpage266
html.description.abstractAt its core, the field of psychometrics is concerned with the measurement of psychological constructs. The term psychometric is derived from the ancient Greek words ψυχικός (“of the soul”; “of life”) and μέτρησις (“measurement”), and describes a group of methods by which a psychologist can measure a test taker’s cognitive ability, personality, attitudes, interests, or other psychological characteristics relevant to a wide variety of therapeutic, occupational, educational, and forensic settings. These measurements are based on the test taker’s responses to a series of questions and statements, known as items, traditionally administered using a pencil-and-paper system of question booklets and answer sheets. Within practitioner circles (as is the case in this chapter), “psychometrics,” “psychological assessment,” and “psychological measurement” are terms that are used interchangeably (Coaley, 2014).


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