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dc.contributor.authorRees, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-06T14:52:49Z
dc.date.available2017-02-06T14:52:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-31
dc.identifier.citationRees, M. (2016) 'From Outsider to Established - Explaining the Current Popularity and Acceptability of Tattooing', Historical Social Research, 41(3), pp. 157-174. doi: doi.org/10.12759/hsr.41.2016.3.157-174
dc.identifier.issn0172-6404
dc.identifier.doi10.12759/hsr.41.2016.3.157-174
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620369
dc.description.abstractTattooing is a practice long associated with social outsiders – sailors, criminals, bikers and women of disrepute. In recent years, however, the practice has become increasingly popular, and acceptable, in mainstream culture as these marks of distinction appear on an ever greater number of bodies. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, academic literature, and content analysis of popular media, I propose that four inter-related developments have contributed to the redefinition of tattooing: the increasing importance of the body as a site for constructing identity; processes of cultural diversity and globalization; the increased visibility of the practice in popular culture; and attempts to legitimise the practice as an acceptable art form both within academia and popular culture. By drawing together these inter-related developments this paper demonstrates how Elias’ theories of establishedoutsider relations provides an understanding of the processes that lead to changing statuses for certain cultural practices.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/43997044
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ssoar.info/ssoar/handle/document/48888?locale-attribute=en
dc.subjectNorbert Elias
dc.subjectFigurational Sociology
dc.subjectProcess Sociology
dc.subjectTattooing
dc.subjectSociology of the Body
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.titleFrom outsider to established – explaining the current popularity and acceptability of tattooing
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalHistorical Social Research
dc.date.accepted2016-09-30
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW06/02/17MR
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-01
dc.source.volume41
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage157
dc.source.endpage174
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-18T15:44:38Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2017-10-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractTattooing is a practice long associated with social outsiders – sailors, criminals, bikers and women of disrepute. In recent years, however, the practice has become increasingly popular, and acceptable, in mainstream culture as these marks of distinction appear on an ever greater number of bodies. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, academic literature, and content analysis of popular media, I propose that four inter-related developments have contributed to the redefinition of tattooing: the increasing importance of the body as a site for constructing identity; processes of cultural diversity and globalization; the increased visibility of the practice in popular culture; and attempts to legitimise the practice as an acceptable art form both within academia and popular culture. By drawing together these inter-related developments this paper demonstrates how Elias’ theories of establishedoutsider relations provides an understanding of the processes that lead to changing statuses for certain cultural practices.


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