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dc.contributor.authorKassimeris, George
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Leonie
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-15T11:47:59Z
dc.date.available2016-12-15T11:47:59Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-22
dc.identifier.citationKassimeris, G., Jackson, L. (2016) 'Negotiating race and religion in the West Midlands: narratives of inclusion and exclusion during the 1967–69 Wolverhampton bus workers’ turban dispute', Contemporary British History, 31 (3), pp. 343-365.
dc.identifier.issn1361-9462
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13619462.2016.1226807
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620308
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Contemporary British History on 22/09/2016, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/13619462.2016.1226807 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.
dc.description.abstractThis article considers the 1967–1969 Wolverhampton Transport turban dispute in the context of increased anxiety over immigration to the area and Wolverhampton South West MP Enoch Powell’s April 1968 ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech. We trace the narratives of the dispute through letters to the Editor in local newspaper The Express & Star, and argue that the letters column was a site of community construction for writers and readers, which elevated the issue from a trivial industrial dispute to a symbol around which the deep anxieties of race and nation coalesced.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13619462.2016.1226807
dc.subjectWolverhampton Transport turban dispute
dc.subjectBritish Sikhs
dc.subjectEnoch Powell
dc.subjectimmigration
dc.subjectintegration
dc.titleNegotiating race and religion in the West Midlands: narratives of inclusion and exclusion during the 1967–69 Wolverhampton bus workers’ turban dispute
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalContemporary British History
dc.date.accepted2016-08-24
rioxxterms.funderJisc
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW151216GK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-03-22
dc.source.volume31
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage343
dc.source.endpage365
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-18T15:44:38Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-03-22T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThis article considers the 1967–1969 Wolverhampton Transport turban dispute in the context of increased anxiety over immigration to the area and Wolverhampton South West MP Enoch Powell’s April 1968 ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech. We trace the narratives of the dispute through letters to the Editor in local newspaper The Express & Star, and argue that the letters column was a site of community construction for writers and readers, which elevated the issue from a trivial industrial dispute to a symbol around which the deep anxieties of race and nation coalesced.


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