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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorDeacon, Kate
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-07T16:07:41Z
dc.date.available2016-11-07T16:07:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-04
dc.identifier.issn0964-3397
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620270
dc.description.abstractAim To explore nursing interventions for person-centred bereavement care in adult acute and critical care settings. Design A descriptive exploratory study, involving focused, face-to-face interviews. Participants comprised nine registered nurses and one auxiliary nurse, working in environments where sudden death was known to occur, i.e. emergency, cardiac and critical care. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data subjected to directed content analysis. The provision of person-centred care was examined by applying a validated Person-Centred Nursing Framework. Findings Five main themes were identified. Participants’ accounts contained descriptions of bereavement care and the presence of person-centred interventions. Contextual, professional and attitudinal factors influenced the degree to which person-centred care operated. Conclusion Caring for suddenly bereaved families was important to nurses, but also a source of tension and unrest. An important consideration for person-centred practice is movement away from sudden bereavement as a ‘here and now’ event, towards a pathway of supportive care that envisions the longer-term. Further research is required to gain a deeper understanding of person-centred care for the suddenly bereaved and the perceived effectiveness of nursing interventions.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Wolverhampton, Early Researcher Award Scheme
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964339715001172
dc.subjectDeath
dc.subjectEnd-of-life
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectNurses
dc.subjectPerson-centred care
dc.subjectQualitative research
dc.subjectSudden bereavement
dc.titleNurses' experiences of caring for the suddenly bereaved in adult acute and critical care settings, and the provision of person-centred care: A qualitative study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalIntensive and Critical Care Nursing
dc.source.volume33
dc.source.issueApril
dc.source.beginpage39
dc.source.endpage47
refterms.dateFOA2017-03-31T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAim To explore nursing interventions for person-centred bereavement care in adult acute and critical care settings. Design A descriptive exploratory study, involving focused, face-to-face interviews. Participants comprised nine registered nurses and one auxiliary nurse, working in environments where sudden death was known to occur, i.e. emergency, cardiac and critical care. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data subjected to directed content analysis. The provision of person-centred care was examined by applying a validated Person-Centred Nursing Framework. Findings Five main themes were identified. Participants’ accounts contained descriptions of bereavement care and the presence of person-centred interventions. Contextual, professional and attitudinal factors influenced the degree to which person-centred care operated. Conclusion Caring for suddenly bereaved families was important to nurses, but also a source of tension and unrest. An important consideration for person-centred practice is movement away from sudden bereavement as a ‘here and now’ event, towards a pathway of supportive care that envisions the longer-term. Further research is required to gain a deeper understanding of person-centred care for the suddenly bereaved and the perceived effectiveness of nursing interventions.


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