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dc.contributor.authorPenzin, Alexei
dc.contributor.editorBudraitskis, Ilya
dc.contributor.editorZhilyaev, Arseniy
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-19T15:15:02Z
dc.date.available2016-10-19T15:15:02Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationIn: Ilya Budraitskis (Author), Arseniy Zhilyaev (Author), Pedagogical Poem: The Archive of the Future Museum of History
dc.identifier.isbn9788831719230
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620225
dc.description.abstractIt would be no exaggeration to say that rather formalistic approaches to the art and culture of the first Soviet decade still dominate in post-Soviet academia. However, these approaches are substantially prescribed by later ideological concepts of “totalitarianism” and a radically negative view of the Soviet experience. The period’s artistic practices and achievements are seen outside the political and social experience of the victorious revolution, and the powerful impulses for transforming collective life that emanated from it. They are treated as discrete formal manifestations of the local modernist tradition, as acts of individual resistance, cunning maneuvers or forced compromises on the part of outstanding "lone creators” vis-à-vis the cultural policy of the Bolsheviks after they had come to power.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMarsilio
dc.subjectAvant-garde
dc.subjectbiopolitcs
dc.subjectthe early Soviet art
dc.subjectproductionism
dc.subjectart theory
dc.titleThe Biopolitics of the Soviet Avant-Garde
dc.typeChapter in book
pubs.edition1st
pubs.place-of-publicationVenezia, Italy
dc.source.beginpage76
dc.source.endpage96
html.description.abstractIt would be no exaggeration to say that rather formalistic approaches to the art and culture of the first Soviet decade still dominate in post-Soviet academia. However, these approaches are substantially prescribed by later ideological concepts of “totalitarianism” and a radically negative view of the Soviet experience. The period’s artistic practices and achievements are seen outside the political and social experience of the victorious revolution, and the powerful impulses for transforming collective life that emanated from it. They are treated as discrete formal manifestations of the local modernist tradition, as acts of individual resistance, cunning maneuvers or forced compromises on the part of outstanding "lone creators” vis-à-vis the cultural policy of the Bolsheviks after they had come to power.


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