Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBurns, Carol Rhonda
dc.contributor.authorLagdon, Susan
dc.contributor.authorBoyda, David
dc.contributor.authorArmour, Cherie
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T13:58:20Z
dc.date.available2016-10-14T13:58:20Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-05
dc.identifier.citationInterpersonal polyvictimization and mental health in males 2016, 40:75 Journal of Anxiety Disorders
dc.identifier.issn0887-6185
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.janxdis.2016.04.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620208
dc.description.abstractA consistent conclusion within the extant literature is that victimization and in particular polyvictimization leads to adverse mental health outcomes. A large body of literature exists as it pertains to the association between victimisation and mental health in studies utilising samples of childhood victims, female only victims, and samples of male and female victims; less research exists as it relates to males victims of interpersonal violence. The aim of the current study was therefore to identify profiles of interpersonal victimizations in an exclusively male sample and to assess their differential impact on a number of adverse mental health outcomes. Using data from 14,477 adult males from Wave 2 of the NESARC, we identified interpersonal victimization profiles via Latent Class Analysis. Multinomial Logistic Regression was subsequently utilized to establish risk across mental health disorders. A 4-class solution was optimal. Victimisation profiles showed elevated odds ratios for the presence of mental health disorders; suggesting that multiple life-course victimisation typologies exists, and that victimization is strongly associated with psychopathology. Several additional notable findings are discussed.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherScience Direct
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887618516300482
dc.subjectInterpersonal victimisation
dc.subjectPolyvictimisation
dc.subjectLatent class analysis
dc.subjectMales
dc.subjectMental health
dc.subjectPTSD
dc.titleInterpersonal polyvictimization and mental health in males
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
dc.date.accepted2016-04-03
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.project141016DB
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-05
dc.source.volume40
dc.source.beginpage75
dc.source.endpage82
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:01:27Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractA consistent conclusion within the extant literature is that victimization and in particular polyvictimization leads to adverse mental health outcomes. A large body of literature exists as it pertains to the association between victimisation and mental health in studies utilising samples of childhood victims, female only victims, and samples of male and female victims; less research exists as it relates to males victims of interpersonal violence. The aim of the current study was therefore to identify profiles of interpersonal victimizations in an exclusively male sample and to assess their differential impact on a number of adverse mental health outcomes. Using data from 14,477 adult males from Wave 2 of the NESARC, we identified interpersonal victimization profiles via Latent Class Analysis. Multinomial Logistic Regression was subsequently utilized to establish risk across mental health disorders. A 4-class solution was optimal. Victimisation profiles showed elevated odds ratios for the presence of mental health disorders; suggesting that multiple life-course victimisation typologies exists, and that victimization is strongly associated with psychopathology. Several additional notable findings are discussed.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
male vic paper JAD.pdf
Size:
2.007Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0