Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMather, Kim
dc.contributor.authorSeifert, Roger
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T14:28:56Z
dc.date.available2016-09-20T14:28:56Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-27
dc.identifier.citationMather, K., Seifert, R. (2016) 'Police pay-contested and contestable', Industrial Relations Journal, 47 (3) pp. 204-219. doi: 10.1111/irj.12140
dc.identifier.issn0019-8692
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/irj.12140
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620170
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides an analysis of developments in the determination of police pay. It reveals the contested nature of public sector pay setting where the government of the day is given to short-term economic goals over and above any long-term approach to resolving staffing issues in the essential public services. In the case of the police, the Police Federation of England and Wales (PFEW) has traditionally used both industrial and political methods to put pressure on key government decision-makers. Developments reveal increasingly fraught relations between the police and the government, with the 2008 pay dispute in particular remarking a key point of deterioration in this set of relations. Once it became clear after the 2010 general election that the government would ignore industrial pressure then the PFEW felt driven to increase the activities of its political arm. This ultimately backfired with Plebgate leaving them naked in the negotiating chamber
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/irj.12140
dc.subjectPolice Pay
dc.titlePolice pay-contested and contestable
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Relations Journal
dc.contributor.institutionHRM and IR Group; Keele Management School; Keele Staffs Keele ST5 5BG UK
dc.contributor.institutionHRM and IR Group; Keele Management School; Keele Staffs Keele ST5 5BG UK
dc.date.accepted2016-04-19
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW200916RS
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-05-26
dc.source.volume47
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage204
dc.source.endpage219
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-18T15:53:33Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-26T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThis paper provides an analysis of developments in the determination of police pay. It reveals the contested nature of public sector pay setting where the government of the day is given to short-term economic goals over and above any long-term approach to resolving staffing issues in the essential public services. In the case of the police, the Police Federation of England and Wales (PFEW) has traditionally used both industrial and political methods to put pressure on key government decision-makers. Developments reveal increasingly fraught relations between the police and the government, with the 2008 pay dispute in particular remarking a key point of deterioration in this set of relations. Once it became clear after the 2010 general election that the government would ignore industrial pressure then the PFEW felt driven to increase the activities of its political arm. This ultimately backfired with Plebgate leaving them naked in the negotiating chamber


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Policepay2016 Accepted version.pdf
Size:
434.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record