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dc.contributor.authorHOCKENHULL, STELLA
dc.contributor.editorOch, Dana
dc.contributor.editorStrayer, Kirsten
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-14T08:35:03Z
dc.date.available2016-09-14T08:35:03Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationIn: Dana Och, Kirsten Strayer (eds); Transnational Horror Across Visual Media: Fragmented Bodies; pp69-85
dc.identifier.isbn9780415821247
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620105
dc.description.abstractThe ‘anxiety of a displaced – or displaceable – population’ that Jacques Derrida ... finds at the base of all ‘national rootedness’ is an anxiety the Gothic puts to work: threat of invasion from without produces Englishness within ... The English are displaced, figuratively if not physically: their Englishness admits of Otherness, and England itself becomes an alien nation (Schmitt: 3).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9780203567791
dc.subjectThe Reeds
dc.subjectThe Cottage
dc.subjectThe Disappeared
dc.subjectPercy Shelley
dc.subjectLord Byron
dc.subjectWilkie Collins
dc.subjectMrs Radcliffe
dc.subjectMary Braddon
dc.subjectJoseph Mallord
dc.subjectWilliam Turner
dc.subjectCastle of Otranto
dc.subjectMatthew Gregory Lewis
dc.subjectJames Whale
dc.subjectTerence Fisher
dc.subjectHammer
dc.subjectFrankenstein
dc.subjectVictorian Gothic
dc.subjectBritish Horror
dc.subjectDavid Punter and Glennis Byron
dc.subjectJames Rose
dc.subjectDavid Pirie
dc.subjectCannon Schmitt
dc.subjectRaymond Williams
dc.subject9/11
dc.subjectOccult
dc.subjectPainting
dc.subjectFilm
dc.subjectRomanticism
dc.subjectLandscape
dc.subjectBritish Culture
dc.subjectClare Woods
dc.subjectSimon Periton
dc.subjectSublime
dc.subjectSupernatural
dc.subjectUrbanoia
dc.titleDark Monarchs: Gothic Landscapes in Contemporary British Culture
dc.typeChapter in book
pubs.edition1st Edition
pubs.place-of-publicationNew York, US
dc.source.beginpage69
dc.source.endpage85
html.description.abstractThe ‘anxiety of a displaced – or displaceable – population’ that Jacques Derrida ... finds at the base of all ‘national rootedness’ is an anxiety the Gothic puts to work: threat of invasion from without produces Englishness within ... The English are displaced, figuratively if not physically: their Englishness admits of Otherness, and England itself becomes an alien nation (Schmitt: 3).


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