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dc.contributor.authorBellingham-Young, Denise
dc.contributor.authorOdejimi, O
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-06T14:18:33Z
dc.date.available2016-09-06T14:18:33Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.identifier.issn1756-6657
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/619916
dc.description.abstractBackground: Africa remains one of the continents with the highest levels of teenage pregnancies in the world. In spite of this, there are limited empirical research studies on determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. This study aims to investigate the trend and determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Several social and economic factors appear to be the causes of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Therefore, understanding the association between teenage pregnancy and various social and economic factors would help reduce teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Methods: Data sets from the World Bank Organisation of all Africa countries between 2000 and 2010 were obtained to conduct this study. The trends of average teenage pregnancy rate across all regions were examined using descriptive method. Also, the association between teenage pregnancy rate and various economic and social factors were investigated using multivariate statistics methods. Results: In all 52 countries examined there has been a significant reduction in the African teenage pregnancy rate between 2000 and 2010. In addition, correlation analysis carried out showed an inverse significant relationship with life expectancy, literacy rate and contraceptive prevalence. Further analysis reveals that female literacy rate is the most important predictor of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Conclusion: The findings of this research indicate that social and economic factors are important predictors of teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Evidence from this study suggests that a practical approach to reducing the current teenage pregnancy rate is to develop strategies and policies that support and promotes female literacy.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherJournal of Health and Social Care Improvement
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/centre-for-health-and-social-care-improvement-chsci/journal-of-health-and-social-care-improvement/archived-issues/
dc.subjectTeenage pregnancy
dc.subjectAfrica
dc.subjectsocial and economic factors
dc.subjectdeterminants
dc.subjecttrend
dc.titleTeenage pregnancy in Africa: Trend and Determinants in the 21st Century
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Health and Social Care Improvement
dc.date.accepted2016-07
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW060916DBY
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-09-06
dc.source.volume1
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage12
dc.source.endpage20
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:10:47Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2016-09-06T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Africa remains one of the continents with the highest levels of teenage pregnancies in the world. In spite of this, there are limited empirical research studies on determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. This study aims to investigate the trend and determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Several social and economic factors appear to be the causes of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Therefore, understanding the association between teenage pregnancy and various social and economic factors would help reduce teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Methods: Data sets from the World Bank Organisation of all Africa countries between 2000 and 2010 were obtained to conduct this study. The trends of average teenage pregnancy rate across all regions were examined using descriptive method. Also, the association between teenage pregnancy rate and various economic and social factors were investigated using multivariate statistics methods. Results: In all 52 countries examined there has been a significant reduction in the African teenage pregnancy rate between 2000 and 2010. In addition, correlation analysis carried out showed an inverse significant relationship with life expectancy, literacy rate and contraceptive prevalence. Further analysis reveals that female literacy rate is the most important predictor of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Conclusion: The findings of this research indicate that social and economic factors are important predictors of teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Evidence from this study suggests that a practical approach to reducing the current teenage pregnancy rate is to develop strategies and policies that support and promotes female literacy.


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