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dc.contributor.authorLeyland, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-22T15:07:23Z
dc.date.available2016-08-22T15:07:23Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/618627
dc.descriptionA portfolio submitted to The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate in Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psych
dc.description.abstractPresently it is estimated that 6.4 million children aged 4-17 have been diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (McClain and Burks, 2015). To date there has been very little attention to ADHD as a lived experience (Singh, 2011), or even taking into consideration the children’s own views, wishes or feelings (Brady, 2014). This paper offers an overview of the theories and research previously conducted, as well as considering how interactions between individual predispositions and environmental surroundings have shaped how the children experience their diagnoses. There are two classification systems currently in situ to diagnose children experiencing emotional and behavioural difficulties; however this dual system further hinders diagnosing and results in a lack of consistency and substantial reliance upon professional judgment. Even though there is an abundance of multimodal and holistic approaches available for this population, there is still a heavy reliance upon pharmacological treatments without knowing the longterm effects of using such medications. This research offers further understanding of these children and new ways of working with their difficulties and therefore improving their emotional well-being and resilience for the future. Keywords: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); Treatment and diagnosis; Lived experience; Cultural and contextual influences; Participation and voice
dc.language.isoen
dc.title“I was good when I didn’t have it”: giving the ‘ADHD child’ a voice: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.
dc.typeThesis or dissertation
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T13:21:28Z
html.description.abstractPresently it is estimated that 6.4 million children aged 4-17 have been diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (McClain and Burks, 2015). To date there has been very little attention to ADHD as a lived experience (Singh, 2011), or even taking into consideration the children’s own views, wishes or feelings (Brady, 2014). This paper offers an overview of the theories and research previously conducted, as well as considering how interactions between individual predispositions and environmental surroundings have shaped how the children experience their diagnoses. There are two classification systems currently in situ to diagnose children experiencing emotional and behavioural difficulties; however this dual system further hinders diagnosing and results in a lack of consistency and substantial reliance upon professional judgment. Even though there is an abundance of multimodal and holistic approaches available for this population, there is still a heavy reliance upon pharmacological treatments without knowing the longterm effects of using such medications. This research offers further understanding of these children and new ways of working with their difficulties and therefore improving their emotional well-being and resilience for the future. Keywords: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); Treatment and diagnosis; Lived experience; Cultural and contextual influences; Participation and voice


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