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dc.contributor.authorTakhar, Opinderjit
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-04T14:32:02Z
dc.date.available2016-07-04T14:32:02Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-18
dc.identifier.issn0958-4935
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09584935.2017.1353587
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/615466
dc.description.abstractOn 23 April 2013, British Parliament agreed an Amendment on caste to the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill (ERR Bill). The Bill received Royal Assent on 25 April 2013 and Section 97 of the ERR Act (that provides that Government `shall’ use Section 9(5)a to make caste an aspect of race) came into force on 25 June 2013. The Amendment will be made to the Equality Act 2010 by ‘adding caste as ‘an aspect of’ the protected characteristic of race’ (Waughray 2014). Importantly, although the Government’s timetable states that the legislation will be enforced not before October 2015, the considerable delay in implementation is consequential of the opposition from both Sikh and Hindu organisations. To some degree, there was unanimity amongst most British Sikhs that legislation against caste discrimination was unnecessary under British law. The Sikh Council UK (SCUK) declared that ‘caste allegiances were on their way out in the UK’ and demanded a Sunset Clause which essentially renders the caste legislation as temporary for a period of ten years since the credence of the SCUK is that caste will have absolutely no significance for subsequent generations of British Sikhs. This paper provides an analysis of attitudes, primarily from the British Sikh and Punjabi Dalit communities towards caste discrimination legislation in British Law and in particular attitudes towards the proposal of the Sunset Clause
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09584935.2017.1353587
dc.subjectCaste
dc.subjectBritish Legislation
dc.subjectSikh Council UK
dc.subjectCasteWatch UK,
dc.subjectFABO
dc.titleBritish Legislation Against Caste Based Discrimination and the demand for the Sunset Clause
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalContemporary South Asia
dc.date.accepted2016-06-08
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.project040716OKT
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-01-18
dc.source.volume25
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage301
dc.source.endpage316
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T08:34:27Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractOn 23 April 2013, British Parliament agreed an Amendment on caste to the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill (ERR Bill). The Bill received Royal Assent on 25 April 2013 and Section 97 of the ERR Act (that provides that Government `shall’ use Section 9(5)a to make caste an aspect of race) came into force on 25 June 2013. The Amendment will be made to the Equality Act 2010 by ‘adding caste as ‘an aspect of’ the protected characteristic of race’ (Waughray 2014). Importantly, although the Government’s timetable states that the legislation will be enforced not before October 2015, the considerable delay in implementation is consequential of the opposition from both Sikh and Hindu organisations. To some degree, there was unanimity amongst most British Sikhs that legislation against caste discrimination was unnecessary under British law. The Sikh Council UK (SCUK) declared that ‘caste allegiances were on their way out in the UK’ and demanded a Sunset Clause which essentially renders the caste legislation as temporary for a period of ten years since the credence of the SCUK is that caste will have absolutely no significance for subsequent generations of British Sikhs. This paper provides an analysis of attitudes, primarily from the British Sikh and Punjabi Dalit communities towards caste discrimination legislation in British Law and in particular attitudes towards the proposal of the Sunset Clause


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