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dc.contributor.authorJayantilal, K.
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-30T10:57:49Z
dc.date.available2016-06-30T10:57:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-01
dc.identifier.citation(Reinforcing) factors influencing a physical education teachers use of the direct instruction model teaching games 2016 European Physical Education Review
dc.identifier.issn1356-336X
dc.identifier.issn1741-2749
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1356336X16652081
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/615138
dc.description.abstracthe purpose of this study was to explore how a physical education (PE) teacher employed the direct instruction model (DIM) teaching games in a United Kingdom secondary school. The research sought to identify how the teacher utilised the DIM and those factors that influenced his use of the model. Occupational socialization was used to identify the factors that encouraged his use of the DIM. Data were collected from interviews and lesson observations. Inductive data analysis showed that while the teacher presented a ‘full version’ of the DIM, his limited content knowledge impacted on the use of the model in teaching cricket. Factors influencing his use of the model were a sporting perspective, a Post Graduate Certificate in Education mentor and the ability and behaviour of the students. These factors reinforced his undergraduate learning and subsequent use of the DIM. It is suggested that the comparable backgrounds of many PE student teachers may make the DIM an apt model to learn in undergraduate and postgraduate PE courses. However, effective use of the model requires students to be taught and to possess in-depth content knowledge of the game(s)/activities being taught and learned.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage
dc.relation.urlhttp://epe.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1356336X16652081
dc.subjectPhysical education
dc.subjectoccupational socialization
dc.subjectdirect instruction model
dc.subjectgames teaching and learning
dc.title(Reinforcing) factors influencing a physical education teachers use of the direct instruction model teaching games
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Physical Education Review
dc.date.accepted2016-05-09
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW300616NO
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-06-30
dc.source.volume23
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage392
dc.source.endpage411
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:10:47Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T13:04:40Z
html.description.abstracthe purpose of this study was to explore how a physical education (PE) teacher employed the direct instruction model (DIM) teaching games in a United Kingdom secondary school. The research sought to identify how the teacher utilised the DIM and those factors that influenced his use of the model. Occupational socialization was used to identify the factors that encouraged his use of the DIM. Data were collected from interviews and lesson observations. Inductive data analysis showed that while the teacher presented a ‘full version’ of the DIM, his limited content knowledge impacted on the use of the model in teaching cricket. Factors influencing his use of the model were a sporting perspective, a Post Graduate Certificate in Education mentor and the ability and behaviour of the students. These factors reinforced his undergraduate learning and subsequent use of the DIM. It is suggested that the comparable backgrounds of many PE student teachers may make the DIM an apt model to learn in undergraduate and postgraduate PE courses. However, effective use of the model requires students to be taught and to possess in-depth content knowledge of the game(s)/activities being taught and learned.


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