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dc.contributor.authorvan den Akker, Olga
dc.contributor.authorPostavaru, Gianina-Ioana
dc.contributor.authorPurewal, Satvinder
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-15T13:52:05Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-15T13:52:05Zen
dc.date.issued2016-04-26
dc.identifier.citationMaternal psychosocial consequences of twins and multiple births following assisted and natural conception: a meta-analysis 2016 Reproductive BioMedicine Online
dc.identifier.issn1472-6483
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rbmo.2016.04.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/613204
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this meta-analysis is to provide new evidence on the effects on maternal health of multiple births due to assisted reproductive technology (ART). A bibliographic search was undertaken using PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Science Direct. Data extraction was completed using Cochrane Review recommendations, and the review was performed following PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. Meta-analytic data were analysed using random effects models. Eight papers (2993 mothers) were included. Mothers of ART multiple births were significantly more likely to experience depression (standardized mean difference [SMD] d = 0.198, 95% CI 0.050 − 0.345, z = 2.623, P = 0.009; heterogeneity I2 = 36.47%), and stress (SMD d = 0.177, 95% CI 0.049 − 0.305, P = 0.007; heterogeneity I2 = 0.01%) than mothers of ART singletons. No difference in psychosocial distress (combined stress and depression) (SMD d = 0.371, 95% CI −0.153 − 0.895; I2 = 86.962%, P = 0.001) or depression (d = 0.152, 95% CI −0.179 − 0.483: z = 0.901; I2 = 36.918%) were found between mothers of ART and naturally conceived multiple births. In conclusion, mothers of ART multiple births were significantly more likely to have depression and stress than mothers of ART singletons, but were no different from mothers of naturally conceived multiples.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCambridge, UK : Reproductive Healthcare Ltd
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1472648316300724
dc.subjectMeta-analysis
dc.subjectmultiple births
dc.subjectpsychological
dc.subjectdepression
dc.subjectdistress
dc.titleMaternal psychosocial consequences of twins and multiple births following assisted and natural conception: a meta-analysis
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalReproductive BioMedicine Online, 26 April 2016
dc.date.accepted2016-04-19
rioxxterms.funderBritish Academy
rioxxterms.identifier.projectSG132634
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-06-15
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:10:47Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractThe aim of this meta-analysis is to provide new evidence on the effects on maternal health of multiple births due to assisted reproductive technology (ART). A bibliographic search was undertaken using PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Science Direct. Data extraction was completed using Cochrane Review recommendations, and the review was performed following PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. Meta-analytic data were analysed using random effects models. Eight papers (2993 mothers) were included. Mothers of ART multiple births were significantly more likely to experience depression (standardized mean difference [SMD] d = 0.198, 95% CI 0.050 − 0.345, z = 2.623, P = 0.009; heterogeneity I2 = 36.47%), and stress (SMD d = 0.177, 95% CI 0.049 − 0.305, P = 0.007; heterogeneity I2 = 0.01%) than mothers of ART singletons. No difference in psychosocial distress (combined stress and depression) (SMD d = 0.371, 95% CI −0.153 − 0.895; I2 = 86.962%, P = 0.001) or depression (d = 0.152, 95% CI −0.179 − 0.483: z = 0.901; I2 = 36.918%) were found between mothers of ART and naturally conceived multiple births. In conclusion, mothers of ART multiple births were significantly more likely to have depression and stress than mothers of ART singletons, but were no different from mothers of naturally conceived multiples.


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