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dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Timothy C.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Peter
dc.contributor.authorGashua, Ibrahim Babale
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-10T11:37:46Z
dc.date.available2016-06-10T11:37:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-08
dc.identifier.citationGashua, I.B., Williams, P.A., Baldwin, T.C. (2016) 'Molecular characteristics, association and interfacial properties of Gum Arabic harvested from both Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal', Food Hydrocolloids, 61. pp. 514-522
dc.identifier.issn0268-005X
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foodhyd.2016.06.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/612493
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Elsevier in Food Hydrocolloids on 08/06/2016 available online: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodhyd.2016.06.005 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.
dc.description.abstractThe molecular composition of Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal gum exudate samples were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The molecules observed in both samples were found to have diameters of either ∼20 μm, ∼60 μm or ∼10 μm. These most likely represent the arabinogalactan (AG), arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) and glycoprotein (GP) molecules present in Acacia gum exudates. Micrographs obtained for gum solutions that had been left to stand for up to 5 days, indicated that molecular aggregation had occurred, this was particularly evident for the Acacia senegal sample. This aggregation process was attributed to intermolecular electrostatic interactions. The adsorbed layer thickness of the gums adsorbed onto polystyrene latex particles was determined using dynamic light scattering. For the Acacia senegal gum sample, it was found that the adsorbed layer thickness increased over time and after 14 days had a value of 61 nm. These findings are indicative of multilayer adsorption, through intermolecular electrostatic interaction. For the Acacia seyal gum sample the adsorbed layer thickness was only ∼3 nm and did not increase over time. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of a distinct, thick adsorbed layer for the Acacia senegal gum and the presence of a much thinner, more diffuse layer for the Acacia seyal gum sample. Emulsification studies showed that the Acacia senegal gum was more effective at stabilising limonene oil-in-water emulsions than the Acacia seyal sample and that this was because markedly more Acacia senegal gum adsorbed at the oil-water interface compared to the Acacia seyal gum exudate.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectGum Arabic
dc.subjecttransmission electron microscopy
dc.subjectaggregation
dc.titleMolecular characteristics, association and interfacial properties of Gum Arabic harvested from both Acacia Senegal and Acacia seyal
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalFood Hydrocolloids
dc.date.accepted2016-06-02
rioxxterms.funderJisc
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW100616TCB
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-06-08
dc.source.volume61
dc.source.beginpage514
dc.source.endpage522
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:23:24Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2017-06-07T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThe molecular composition of Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal gum exudate samples were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The molecules observed in both samples were found to have diameters of either ∼20 μm, ∼60 μm or ∼10 μm. These most likely represent the arabinogalactan (AG), arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) and glycoprotein (GP) molecules present in Acacia gum exudates. Micrographs obtained for gum solutions that had been left to stand for up to 5 days, indicated that molecular aggregation had occurred, this was particularly evident for the Acacia senegal sample. This aggregation process was attributed to intermolecular electrostatic interactions. The adsorbed layer thickness of the gums adsorbed onto polystyrene latex particles was determined using dynamic light scattering. For the Acacia senegal gum sample, it was found that the adsorbed layer thickness increased over time and after 14 days had a value of 61 nm. These findings are indicative of multilayer adsorption, through intermolecular electrostatic interaction. For the Acacia seyal gum sample the adsorbed layer thickness was only ∼3 nm and did not increase over time. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of a distinct, thick adsorbed layer for the Acacia senegal gum and the presence of a much thinner, more diffuse layer for the Acacia seyal gum sample. Emulsification studies showed that the Acacia senegal gum was more effective at stabilising limonene oil-in-water emulsions than the Acacia seyal sample and that this was because markedly more Acacia senegal gum adsorbed at the oil-water interface compared to the Acacia seyal gum exudate.


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