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dc.contributor.authorKaialy, Waseem
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-07T14:43:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-07T14:43:17Zen
dc.date.issued2016-06-05
dc.identifier.citationOn the effects of blending, physicochemical properties, and their interactions on the performance of carrier-based dry powders for inhalation – a review 2016 Advances in Colloid and Interface Science
dc.identifier.issn0001-8686
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cis.2016.05.014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/612012
dc.description.abstractBlending drug and carrier powders to produce homogeneous drug–carrier adhesive mixtures is a key step in the production of dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. Although the blending conditions can result in different conclusions or probably change the outcome of a study entirely if being selected differently, there is a scarcity of data on the influence of blending processes on the physicochemical properties of bulk powder formulations and the follow-on effects on DPI performance. This paper provides an overview of the interactions between variables related to blending conditions (e.g. blending equipment, time, speed and sequence as well as environmental humidity) and powder physicochemical properties (e.g. size distribution, shape distribution, density, anomeric composition, electrostatic charge, surface, and bulk properties), and their effects on the performance of adhesive mixtures for inhalation in terms of drug content homogeneity, drug–carrier adhesion, and drug aerosolisation behaviour. The relevance of carrier payload, batch size and segregation were also discussed. Challenges and future directions were identified. This review therefore contributes towards a better understanding of the blending process, powder physicochemical properties, and their interlinked effects on the fundamental understanding of adhesive mixtures for inhalation. The knowledge gained is essential to ensure optimum blending and thereby controlled functionality of DPIs.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001868616300756
dc.subjectAdhesive mixtures
dc.subjectCarrier-based dry powder inhaler formulations
dc.subjectHomogeneity
dc.subjectInterparticulate forces
dc.subjectMixers
dc.subjectMicromeritic and bulk properties.
dc.titleOn the effects of blending, physicochemical properties, and their interactions on the performance of carrier-based dry powders for inhalation – a review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.eissn1873-3727
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Colloid and Interface Science
dc.date.accepted2016-05-28
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW070616WK
dc.source.volume235
dc.source.beginpage70
dc.source.endpage89
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:24:44Z
refterms.dateFOA2017-06-04T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractBlending drug and carrier powders to produce homogeneous drug–carrier adhesive mixtures is a key step in the production of dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. Although the blending conditions can result in different conclusions or probably change the outcome of a study entirely if being selected differently, there is a scarcity of data on the influence of blending processes on the physicochemical properties of bulk powder formulations and the follow-on effects on DPI performance. This paper provides an overview of the interactions between variables related to blending conditions (e.g. blending equipment, time, speed and sequence as well as environmental humidity) and powder physicochemical properties (e.g. size distribution, shape distribution, density, anomeric composition, electrostatic charge, surface, and bulk properties), and their effects on the performance of adhesive mixtures for inhalation in terms of drug content homogeneity, drug–carrier adhesion, and drug aerosolisation behaviour. The relevance of carrier payload, batch size and segregation were also discussed. Challenges and future directions were identified. This review therefore contributes towards a better understanding of the blending process, powder physicochemical properties, and their interlinked effects on the fundamental understanding of adhesive mixtures for inhalation. The knowledge gained is essential to ensure optimum blending and thereby controlled functionality of DPIs.


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