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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Derrick
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-09T14:37:34Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-09T14:37:34Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.citationBrown, D., Wyon, M. (2014) 'The effect of moderate glycemic energy bar consumption on blood glucose and mood in dancers' Medical Problems of Performing Artists 29 (1) pp. 27-31 doi: 10.21091/mppa.2014.1007
dc.identifier.issn0885-1158
dc.identifier.pmid24647459
dc.identifier.doi10.21091/mppa.2014.1007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/608693
dc.description.abstractIngesting quality carbohydrates has been shown to be essential for dancers. Given that most dance classes take place in the morning, it has been recommended that dancers eat a well-balanced breakfast containing carbohydrates, fats, and protein as a means of fuelling this activity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a moderate glycemic index energy (MGI) bar or a fasting condition on dancers' blood glucose levels and perceived pleasure-displeasure response during the first dance class of the day. In a randomized counterbalanced design, 10 female preprofessional dance students took their regular scheduled contemporary dance class, on four separate occasions. On each occasion, they consumed either a commercially prepared carbohydrate (CHO)-dense energy bar (47.3 g CHO) or water (FAST). Plasma glucose responses and pleasure-displeasure affect were measured before and at two time points during the class. Dancers who consumed the MGI bar had significantly greater peak blood glucose levels at all time points than those who fasted (p<0.05). Regarding affective state measures, participants who had breakfast had significantly greater pleasure scores than those who only ingested water(p<0.05). In conclusion, results suggest that CHO with an MGI value positively impacts blood glucose concentrations during a dance class. Further, we conclude that skipping breakfast can have an unfavorable effect on the pleasure-displeasure state of dancers. These findings highlight the impact of breakfast on how one feels, as well as the physiological and metabolic benefits of CHO as an exogenous energy source in dancers.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherScience & Medicine
dc.subjectglycaemic energy bar
dc.subjectblood glucose
dc.subjectmood
dc.subjectdancers
dc.subject.meshAffect
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose
dc.subject.meshDancing
dc.subject.meshDietary Carbohydrates
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshGlycemic Index
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshPhysical Endurance
dc.subject.meshPhysical Exertion
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleThe effect of moderate glycemic energy bar consumption on blood glucose and mood in dancers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalMedical Problems of Performing Artists
dc.source.volume29
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage27
dc.source.endpage31
html.description.abstractIngesting quality carbohydrates has been shown to be essential for dancers. Given that most dance classes take place in the morning, it has been recommended that dancers eat a well-balanced breakfast containing carbohydrates, fats, and protein as a means of fuelling this activity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a moderate glycemic index energy (MGI) bar or a fasting condition on dancers' blood glucose levels and perceived pleasure-displeasure response during the first dance class of the day. In a randomized counterbalanced design, 10 female preprofessional dance students took their regular scheduled contemporary dance class, on four separate occasions. On each occasion, they consumed either a commercially prepared carbohydrate (CHO)-dense energy bar (47.3 g CHO) or water (FAST). Plasma glucose responses and pleasure-displeasure affect were measured before and at two time points during the class. Dancers who consumed the MGI bar had significantly greater peak blood glucose levels at all time points than those who fasted (p<0.05). Regarding affective state measures, participants who had breakfast had significantly greater pleasure scores than those who only ingested water(p<0.05). In conclusion, results suggest that CHO with an MGI value positively impacts blood glucose concentrations during a dance class. Further, we conclude that skipping breakfast can have an unfavorable effect on the pleasure-displeasure state of dancers. These findings highlight the impact of breakfast on how one feels, as well as the physiological and metabolic benefits of CHO as an exogenous energy source in dancers.


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