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dc.contributor.authorButton, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Graham
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-08T14:17:04Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-08T14:17:04Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10-08
dc.identifier.citationButton, M., & Brooks, G. (2016). From ‘shallow’ to ‘deep’ policing: ‘crash-for-cash’ insurance fraud investigation in England and Wales and the need for greater regulation. Policing and Society, 26 (2), pp 210-229.
dc.identifier.issn1043-9463
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10439463.2014.942847
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/604850
dc.description.abstractThe policing of insurance fraud has traditionally been dealt with beyond the criminal justice system as a private matter between the claimant and the insurer with only a few iconic cases referred to the criminal justice system each year. The growth of insurance fraud, particularly ‘crash-for-cash’ fraud, and the disinterest of the police, has led to a change in the response of the insurance industry. This paper will argue that this response can be characterised as a shift from the traditional ‘shallow’ to a ‘deeper’ form of policing which sees greater focus upon criminal and quasi-criminal outcomes. This paper explores some of the private and innovative methods the industry has developed and illustrates what greater private criminal investigation might look like at a time when police privatisation has become a higher profile issue. The paper argues the shift to ‘deeper’ policing necessitates greater regulation of the private investigation of crime and outlines a number of proposals to address this gap which require further consideration and debate.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2014.942847
dc.subjectprivate investigation
dc.subjectinsurance fraud
dc.subject‘shallow’ and ‘deep’ policing,
dc.subjectprivatisation
dc.subjectCriminology
dc.subjectPolicing
dc.titleFrom ‘shallow’ to ‘deep’ policing: ‘crash-for-cash’ insurance fraud investigation in England and Wales and the need for greater regulation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalPolicing and Society
dc.date.accepted2014-04-11
dc.source.volume26
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage210
dc.source.endpage229
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-18T12:48:29Z
html.description.abstractThe policing of insurance fraud has traditionally been dealt with beyond the criminal justice system as a private matter between the claimant and the insurer with only a few iconic cases referred to the criminal justice system each year. The growth of insurance fraud, particularly ‘crash-for-cash’ fraud, and the disinterest of the police, has led to a change in the response of the insurance industry. This paper will argue that this response can be characterised as a shift from the traditional ‘shallow’ to a ‘deeper’ form of policing which sees greater focus upon criminal and quasi-criminal outcomes. This paper explores some of the private and innovative methods the industry has developed and illustrates what greater private criminal investigation might look like at a time when police privatisation has become a higher profile issue. The paper argues the shift to ‘deeper’ policing necessitates greater regulation of the private investigation of crime and outlines a number of proposals to address this gap which require further consideration and debate.


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