• The role of life context and self-defined well-being in the outcomes that matter to people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia

      Lloyd, Helen; Lloyd, Joanne; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Peters, Michele; Peninsula Medical School; Plymouth University; Devon UK; School of Psychology; Sport and Exercise; Staffordshire University; Stoke on Trent UK; Nuffield Department of Population Health; University of Oxford; Oxford UK; Nuffield Department of Population Health; University of Oxford; Oxford UK (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2017-04-03)
      Objective Conduct a deep exploration of the outcomes that matter to people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and understand from their perspective how these outcomes can be achieved. Sample and Methods In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 22 people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Interviews were analysed using thematic frameworks, and a realist informed theories of change approach. Results Our study revealed the potential causal relationships between the context of a person's life, short-term goals and long-term outcomes. We provide a nuanced and detailed exploration of outcomes that matter for people with schizophrenia in relation to self-defined well-being. Achieving life milestones, feeling safe and outcomes related to improved physical health along with employment, a positive sense of self and psychosocial outcomes, were highly valued. For short- and long-term outcomes to be achieved, individuals required medication with minimal side-effects, cognitive behavioural therapy, family/social support and meaningful activities in their lives. Well-being was influenced by life context and short- and long-term outcomes, but in a circular nature also framed what short-term goals could be achieved. Conclusions Working with people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia to identify and achieve better outcomes will necessitate a person-centred approach. This will require an appreciation of the relationship between the statutory and non-statutory resources that are available and a consideration of an individual's current well-being status. This approach acknowledges personal strengths and encourages ownership of goals and supports self-management.