• The influence of motivation and attentional style on affective, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes of an exercise class

      Jones, L.; Karageorghis, C. I.; Lane, A. M.; Bishop, D. T.; Academy of Sport and Physical Activity; Sheffield Hallam University; Sheffield UK; Department of Life Sciences; Brunel University London; Uxbridge UK; Institute of Sport; University of Wolverhampton; Wolverhampton UK; Department of Life Sciences; Brunel University London; Uxbridge UK (Wiley, 2015-11)
      Exercise classes are a popular form of physical activity. A greater understanding of the individual difference factors that might influence the outcomes of such classes could help to minimize the high dropout rates associated with exercise. The study explored the effects of dominant attentional style and degree of self-determination on affective, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes following structured exercise classes. Data from 417 female participants revealed that those with a dominant attentional style for association (Associators) reported significantly (P < 0.05) more positive affective, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes than did Dissociators, and were more self-determined. Highly self-determined individuals reported the most positive outcomes. Almost 29% of the variance in participants' affective valence could be explained by Dissociators' behavioral regulations. Results lend support to the notion that attentional style is associated with motivation. The combination of attentional style and degree of self-determination appear to be noteworthy individual difference factors that influence responses to exercise classes and could thus have a bearing on long-term exercise adherence.