• Bone status in professional cyclists

      Campion, F.; Nevill, Alan M.; Karlsson, M. K.; Lounana, J.; Shabani, M.; Fardellone, P.; Medelli, J. (Georg Thieme Verlag, 2010)
      Professional cycling combines extensive endurance training with non weight-bearing exercise, two factors often associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 30 professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age: 29.1 (3.4) years; height: 178.5 (6.7) cm; weight: 71.3 (6.1) kg; %fat mass: 9.7 (3.2)%; V˙O2max: 70.5 (5.5) ml·kg−1·min−1) and in 30 young healthy males used as reference (28.6 (4.5) years; 176.5 (6.3) cm; 73.4 (7.3) kg; 20.7 (5.8)%). Adjusting for differences in age, height, fat mass, lean body mass, and calcium intake by ANCOVA, professional cyclists had similar head BMD (p=0.383) but lower total body (1.135 (0.071) vs. 1.248 (0.104) g·cm−2; p<0.001), arms (0.903 (0.075) vs. 0.950 (0.085), p=0.028), legs (1.290 (0.112) vs. 1.479 (0.138); p<0.001), spine (0.948 (0.100) vs. 1.117 (0.147) g·cm−2; p<0.001), pelvis (1.054 (0.084) vs. 1.244 (0.142), p<0.001), lumbar spine (1.046 (0.103) vs. 1.244 (0.167), P<0.001), and femoral neck BMD (0.900 (0.115) vs. 1.093 (0.137), p<0.001) compared to reference subjects. Professional cycling appears to negatively affect BMD in young healthy and highly active males, the femoral neck being the most affected site (−18%) in spite of the elevated muscle contractions inherent to the activity.