• Bibliography of British Travel Writing, 1780 - 1840: The European Tour, 1814 - 1818 (excluding Britain and Ireland)

      Colbert, Benjamin (Cardiff University: Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research, 2004)
      The acquisition in 1997 by Cardiff University of the English language version of the Corvey Microfiche Edition (CME) presented a significant opportunity for research into English literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 'Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780–1840' is a twice-yearly journal that is committed to foregrounding innovative Romantic-studies research into bibliography, book history, intertextuality, and textual studies. INTRODUCTION TO THIS ARTICLE: "In 1826, Mary Shelley recalled the Summer of 1814 as ‘incarnate romance’, when ‘a new generation’ of youthful travellers with ‘time and money at command’, yet heedless of ‘dirty packets and wretched inns’, ‘poured, in one vast stream, across the Pas de Calais into France’. It is estimated that some 15,512 British tourists and residents were present in Paris alone during 1815, while, at home, accounts began appearing in print. By 1817, the Edinburgh Review commented: The restoration of peace has, as might have been foreseen, produced a vast number of Books of Travels."
    • Collected Satires III: Complete Longer Satires

      Colbert, Benjamin (London: Pickering & Chatto Publishers, 2008)
      British Satire, 1785–1840 is published in a 5 volume set. Despite the fact that Romantic period literary satire has received much critical attention, there has up to now been no scholarly collection devoted to this body of work. This set provides one, offering a representative collection of the verse satire published between the mid-1780s and the mid-1830s. It makes available a wealth of fascinating, rare and hitherto unedited material and provides the annotation necessary to a full appreciation of the complexities of the period's satire. The set also includes two important single-author volumes, the first scholarly editions of the satires of William Gifford and Thomas Moore, as well as lesser known and anonymous works.
    • Shelley's Eye: Travel Writing and Aesthetic Vision

      Colbert, Benjamin (Aldershot, Ashgate Publishing, 2005)
      Percy Bysshe Shelley joined the deluge of sightseers that poured onto the Continent after Napoleon's defeat in 1814, and over the next eight years Shelley followed major travelling trends, visiting Switzerland in 1816 and Italy from 1818. Shelley's Eye is the first study to address Shelley's participation in the travel culture of Post-Napoleonic Europe, and the first to consider Shelley as an important travel writer in his own right. This book is informed by original research on a wide range of period travel writings, including Mary Shelley and Shelley's neglected collaboration, History of a Six Weeks' Tour (1817), in which 'Mont Blanc' first appeared. Fully responsive to the culture of travel, Shelley's travel prose and poetry form fascinating conversations with major Romantic travellers like Byron, Wollstonecraft, and Wordsworth, as well as lesser-known but widely read travel writers of the day, including Morris Birkbeck, Charlotte Eaton, and John Chetwode Eustace. In this provocative study, Benjamin Colbert demonstrates how the Grand Tour remains a vital cultural metaphor for Shelley and his contemporaries, under pressure from mass travel and popular culture. Shelley's travel prose and 'visionary' poetry explore motives of perception underlying travel discourse and posit an authentic 'aesthetic vision' that reconfigures social, historical, and political meanings of 'sights' from the perspective of an ideal tourist-observer. Shelley's Eye offers a new perspective on Shelley's intellectual history. It is also a timely and important contribution to recent interdisciplinary scholarship that aims to re-evaluate Romantic idealism in the context of physical, experiential, or material cultural practices. (Ashgate Publishing)