• Anomalous foreknowledge and cognitive impenetrability in Gnomeo and Juliet

      Geal, Robert (Oxford University Press, 2017-05-27)
      This essay locates film adaptations of well-known originals within the context of two interrelated perceptual processes. The first of these is Richard Gerrig’s notion of anomalous suspense, in which audiences experience suspense even if they know the outcome of a film through repeat viewings. The second of these is Jerry Fodor’s concept of cognitive impenetrability, in which the human brain can have multiple responses to the same visual information. Lower level non-conscious brain functions can respond to visual stimuli in automated ways even if higher level conscious brain functions understand that the automated responses are being deceived. The essay explores how a loose film adaptation of a canonical ‘original’, Gnomeo and Juliet, manipulates these perceptual anomalies at the aesthetic and narrative levels. The film has two interrelated reflexive bundlings of anomalous suspense and cognitive impenetrability. The first is foreknowledge about certain well-known elements of the adapted narrative which characters comment on, and which are eventually transcended. The second is the film’s link between animation’s ontological perceptual illusion which makes the inanimate become animated, and the diegetic status of the supposedly inanimate garden gnomes being able to move of their own volition. Both of these elements exploit the brain’s modular distinctions between automated and conscious perceptual responses.
    • Book Review The Kindred of the Kibbo Kift by Annebella Pollen

      Hackney, Fiona (Oxford University Press, 2019-01-23)
      This is a beautiful and intriguing book that tells a fascinating story about a little-known form of alternative modernist design and craft practice. Published by the independent Donlon Books and written by Annebella Pollen as part of an Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded Fellowship, it draws on numerous archival sources from public and private collections, and includes over a hundred largely unseen images in black and white, and colour.
    • 'Everybody's Free to Fail': Subsidized British Revivals of the American Canon

      Browne, Sarah; Gordon, Robert; Jubin, Olaf (Oxford University Press, 2017-01)
    • Identity: Being-in-the-world and becoming

      Dhanda, Meena; Garchar, Kimberley; Shew, Melissa (Oxford University Press, 2020-11-17)
    • Kinesthetic Empathy: Conditions for Viewing

      Wood, Karen; Rosenberg, Douglas (Oxford University Press, 2016)
      The Oxford Handbook of Screendance Studies offers a full overview of the histories, practices, and critical and theoretical foundations of the rapidly changing landscape of screendance. Drawing on their practices, technologies, theories, and philosophies, scholars from the fields of dance, performance, visual art, cinema and media arts articulate the practice of screendance as an interdisciplinary, hybrid form that has yet to be correctly sited as an academic field worthy of critical investigation. Each chapter discusses and reframe current issues, as a means of promoting and enriching dialogue within the wider community of dance and the moving image. Topics addressed embrace politics of the body; agency, race, and gender in screendance; the relationship of choreography to image; constructs of space and time; representation and effacement; production and curatorial practice; and other areas of intersecting disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of Screendance Studies features newly-commissioned and original scholarship that will be essential reading for all those interested in the intersection of dance and the moving image, including film and video-makers, dance artists, screendance artists, academics and writers, producers, composers, as well as the wider interested public. It will become an invaluable resource for researchers and professionals in the field.
    • 'Made to think and forced to feel': The power of counter-ritual

      Dhanda, Meena; Rathore, Aakash Singh (Oxford University Press, 2021-02-17)
      Dr Ambedkar argued that habitual conduct with the backing of religion is not easy to change and that salvation will come only if the caste Hindu is ‘made to think and is forced to feel that he must alter his ways’. He meant that the casteist conduct of the ‘caste Hindu’ is hard to change because it springs from an ingrained habit of mind. The impetus to change ways can come from unexpected contingencies: impersonal political junctures, very personal histories, inter-personal challenges, intra-group skirmishes, a whole network of factors that brings the habitual conduct of caste up for scrutiny. This mix of factors is quite complicated in the U.K. where I am located as a researcher and academic, regularly engaging with the public. We need to think through the means of defiance against systematic oppression and stigmatisation of people on the basis of caste. In this paper I will reflect upon whether caste might be disrupted in its everyday reproduction through the use of counter-rituals.
    • Painting, the Virtual, and the Celluloid Frame

      Harris, Simon J.; Grimshaw, Mark (Oxford University Press, 2014-02-27)
      This chapter discusses and progresses through an aesthetic enquiry into a relationship between the virtual and the actual surface of painting. It is through the inherent temporality of both painting and cinema that the notion of a dynamic duration is interrogated. At the core of this investigative methodology the philosophies of both Henri Bergson and Gilles Deleuze are employed to examine how duration in painting can be experienced outside of the static recollection. Fundamentally this follows Deleuze’s seminal writing about the cinematic and the function of the image in relation to time. The author accepts Deleuze’s invitation to employ his concepts as a toolbox for dynamism. Thus a model is assembled in which the notion of the “recollection-image” and its relationship to the temporality of the “movement-image” is developed through the potential of the figural as a space between the figurative and the abstract in painting.
    • Rapport

      Hamilton, Judith (Oxford University Press, 2021-08-07)
    • Sikh Sects

      Takhar, Opinderjit Kaur; Singh, Pashaura; Fenech, Louis E. (Oxford University Press, 2014-03)
      This article discusses the issues and implications associated with attempting to provide a homogenous definition of Sikh identity that encompasses all ‘Sikhs’. The existence of sects or groups which define themselves as Sikhs in one way or another present a number of contentious debates within the global Panth. Sects amongst the followers of the Sikh Gurus have existed from the very early period of the development of the Panth. The diversity in the practical expression of Sikhi prompted the Singh Sabha’s efforts towards establishing a homogenous Sikh identity which later became synonymous with the Khalsa paradigm. There are some sects amongst Sikhs who adamantly affirm their Panthic identity such as the Namdharis and Nirankaris. However, there are a significant number of individuals who are actively seeking their total break-off from the Panth in order to assert an independent non-Sikh (and non-Hindu) identity. In this case, the efforts of the Ravidassias and Valmikis are significant.
    • Spirituality and Contemporary Art

      Arya, Rina; Burch Brown, Frank (Oxford University Press, 2016-08-31)
      The artworks under discussion detail the scope and breadth of art that can be described as spiritual by virtue of its revelatory, revitalizing and contemplative capacities. Rather than interrogating the relationship between art and religion, more pertinent questions in the contemporary age are: What is the nature of the dialogue between art and spirituality, how do the two come together, and what form does the meeting take? The range of multimedia brings novel forms of encounter that occur outside the gallery and other spaces and involve audio-visual and other means of articulating the spiritual. These new forms make different demands on viewers; they create greater intimacy (often through immersion), both physically and psychologically, and one of the consequences of having greater intimacy can be a heightened awareness that increases presentness and a sense of embodiment. What we learn is that there are potentially as many interpretations of spirituality as there are viewers.
    • Warde (née Becker), Beatrice Lamberton Becker (1900–1969)

      Glaser, Jessica (Oxford University Press, 2019-03-30)
      Warde (née Becker), Beatrice Lamberton Becker (1900–1969), typographer, was born in New York, USA, on 20 September 1900, the only child of Gustav Becker (1861–1959), pianist and composer, and his wife, May, née Lamberton (1873–1958), the journalist and literary critic ...
    • World’s end: punk films from London and New York, 1977-1984

      Halligan, Benjamin; McKay, George; Arnold, Gina (Oxford University Press, 2021-05-30)
      Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, 1977) concludes with the protagonist, seemingly weary of the company of his delinquent friends (given over to gang violence and gang rape, and in the wake of the needless death of the youngest and most disorientated), finding a moment of peace in the apartment of his previously unenthused girlfriend. They have reconciled, a future together has begun, and “How Deep is Your Love” by the Bee Gees – a major international chart hit of 1977 – plays over the closing credits. The couple’s connection was initially based on shared disco dancing abilities, and their get-togethers on the dance floor and in the dance studio have offered the opportunity of an escape for each. For Tony Manero (John Travolta), the escape is from his underpaid blue-collar job and suffocating family tensions – where his life at home, as a second-generation Italian immigrant, seems like stepping back into the old country for family meals, in sharp contrast to the grooming he devotes to his appearance, upstairs in his bedroom. Once outside, the very streets of New York seem to have been recast as a dance floor – via mobile shots of Travolta’s feet, pacing with a cocksure swagger to the beat of the Bee Gees soundtrack. For Stephanie Mangano (Karen Lynn Gorney), the escape is from more obscure forms of patriarchal exploitation, enacted via her aspirations to a glamourous and independent life, which can be read as calibrated to an imagining of the nightclub Studio 54 (which opened in 1977), not least in her celebrity name-dropping and initial distaste for her uncultured suitor. The final shot of Saturday Night Fever frames the couple in her apartment: polished wooden floors, exposed brick walls, a healthy rubber plant, an acoustic guitar resting against a sofa, and a window ledge looking out across Manhattan – a much more desirable locale than the film’s initial setting of Tony’s Brooklyn (see Figure 1). In short, to return to “How Deep is Your Love”, the couple have realised that they were “living in a world of fools / breaking us down when they all should let us be / [since] we belong to you and me”, and enshrine this shared sentiment in domestication. The New York of 1977 has tested them and their success in meeting this test has allowed them to take a synchronised step forward, and establish themselves on an upwardly mobile trajectory.