• Identity: Being-in-the-world and becoming

      Dhanda, Meena; Garchar, Kimberley; Shew, Melissa (Oxford University Press, 2020-12-01)
    • A space has been made: revealing bisexual+ stories in musical theatre

      Whitfield, Sarah (John Hopkins University Press, 2020-12-01)
    • Disrupting heteronormative temporality through queer dramaturgies: Fun Home, Hadestown and A Strange Loop

      Whitfield, Sarah (MDPI, 2020-12-01)
      This article considers how André De Shields performance in Hadestown (2019), and the musicals Fun Home (2015) and A Strange Loop (2019) can be seen to respond to the ‘quagmire of the present’ (Mũnoz, 2009 1): and argues that they disrupt heteronormative temporality through queer dramaturgy. It explores musicals that present queer performativity and/or queer dramaturgies, and addresses how they enact queer strategies of resistance through historical materialist critiques of personal biographies. It suggests that to do this, they disrupt the heteronormative dramaturgical time of the musical, and considers how utopian ‘small but profound moments’ (Dolan 2005, p. 6) may enact structural change to the form of the musical. The article carries out a close reading of De Shields’ performance practice, and analyses the dramaturgy of Fun Home and A Strange Loop through drawing on the methodologies of José Mũnoz (2009) and Elizabeth Freeman (2010). It considers how they make queer labour visible by drawing on post-dramatic strategies, ultimately suggesting that to varying extents, these musicals offer resistance to the heteronormative musical form.
    • 'Made to think and forced to feel': The power of counter-ritual

      Dhanda, Meena; Rathore, Aakash Singh (Oxford University Press, 2020-09-03)
      Dr Ambedkar argued that habitual conduct with the backing of religion is not easy to change and that salvation will come only if the caste Hindu is ‘made to think and is forced to feel that he must alter his ways’. He meant that the casteist conduct of the ‘caste Hindu’ is hard to change because it springs from an ingrained habit of mind. The impetus to change ways can come from unexpected contingencies: impersonal political junctures, very personal histories, inter-personal challenges, intra-group skirmishes, a whole network of factors that brings the habitual conduct of caste up for scrutiny. This mix of factors is quite complicated in the U.K. where I am located as a researcher and academic, regularly engaging with the public. We need to think through the means of defiance against systematic oppression and stigmatisation of people on the basis of caste. In this paper I will reflect upon whether caste might be disrupted in its everyday reproduction through the use of counter-rituals.
    • Play time: Gender, anti-semitism and temporality in medieval biblical drama

      Black, Daisy (Manchester University Press, 2020-08-01)
    • SOLUS: An Online Audiovisual Installation (NIME2020 installation proposal)

      Dalgleish, Mat (Birmingham City University, 2020-07-21)
    • Sound objects: Towards procedural audio for and as theatre

      Whitfield, Sarah; Dalgleish, Mat; Toulson, Rob; Paterson, Justin; Hepworth- Sawyer, Russ (Routledge, 2020-06-01)
      Procedural audio has been the subject of significant contemporary interest, but prior examples in relation to theatre sound are limited. After providing background to theatre sound and procedural audio, we introduce two artefacts, RayGun and INTERIOR, that explore issues around theatre sound. RayGun is an augmented prop prototype that uses sensor driven, procedurally generated and locally diffused sound to address prior deficiencies. INTERIOR reimagines Maurice Maeterlinck’s 1895 play Interior as an embedded, generative and largely procedurally generated audio play housed in a shortwave radio-like artefact. Intended to provide an accessible experience, the listener uses a single knob interface to scan through a soundscape of simulated radio stations and ‘find’ the play. We present some initial findings and conclude with suggestions for future work.
    • Afterword: towards a future paradigm

      Prior, Ross W; Mateus-Berr, Ruth; Jochum, Richard (De Gruyter, 2020-05-01)
      The use of art as research has greatly matured, and, despite the current preoccupation with measurement in the education sector, artistic research has continued to gain acceptance as a legitimate methodology for artists. Yet art-based research is still not completely and universally embedded within higher education learning and teaching approaches. The field’s continued lack of confidence in using art as a vehicle of research is one reason. There is a need to stop relying upon other disciplines to justify the power of art. If we acknowledge that words cannot always reveal the uniquely felt qualities of art, then we cannot persist in using words as exclusive modes of research. Personal, embodied ways of knowing are of interest to researchers, and values the importance of knowledge that is incrementally gained through the act of doing and being. However, art is empirical—art and art processes are observable and can be entwined throughout the art-making process as a methodology of inquiry. Proposed here, as a future paradigm, is the threefold primacy of art in research, learning and teaching—positioning art as the topic, process and outcome of research. Significantly art as research recognizes art objects as full participants and uses art as its evidence.
    • IV—Philosophical foundations of anti-casteism

      Dhanda, Meena (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2020-04-27)
      The paper begins from a working definition of caste as a contentious form of social belonging and a consideration of casteism as a form of inferiorization. It takes anti-casteism as an ideological critique aimed at unmasking the unethical operations of caste, drawing upon B. R. Ambedkar’s notion of caste as ‘graded inequality’. The politico-legal context of the unfinished trajectory of instituting protection against caste discrimination in Britain provides the backdrop for thinking through the philosophical foundations of anti-casteism. The peculiar religio-discursive aspect of ‘emergent vulnerability’ is noted, which explains the recent introduction of the trope of ‘institutional casteism’ used as a shield by deniers of caste against accusations of casteism. The language of protest historically introduced by anti-racists is thus usurped and inverted in a simulated language of anti-colonialism. It is suggested that the stymieing of the UK legislation on caste is an effect of collective hypocrisies, the refusal to acknowledge caste privilege, and the continuity of an agonistic intellectual inheritance, exemplified in the deep differences between Ambedkar and Gandhi in the Indian nationalist discourse on caste. The paper argues that for a modern anti-casteism to develop, at stake is the possibility of an ethical social solidarity. Following Ambedkar, this expansive solidarity can only be found through our willingness to subject received opinions and traditions to critical scrutiny. Since opposed groups ‘make sense’ of their worlds in ways that might generate collective hypocrisies of denial of caste effects, anti-casteism must be geared to expose the lie that caste as the system of graded inequality is benign and seamlessly self-perpetuating, when it is everywhere enforced through penalties for transgression of local caste norms with the complicity of the privileged castes. The ideal for modern anti-casteism is Maitri (friendship) formed through praxis, eschewing birth-ascribed caste status and loyalties.
    • Kantian forgiveness: fallibility, guilt and the need to become a better person: reply to Blöser

      Satne, Paula (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-03-10)
      In ‘Human Fallibility and the Need for Forgiveness’, Claudia Blöser (Philosophia 47:1-19, 2019) has proposed a Kantian account of our reasons to forgive that situates our moral fallibility as their ultimate ground. Blöser argues that Kant’s duty to be forgiving is grounded on the need to be relieved from the burden of our moral failure (guilt), a need that we all have in virtue of our moral fallible nature, regardless of whether or not we have repented. Blöser claims that Kant’s proposal yields a plausible account of the normative status of forgiveness. Kant classifies the duty to be forgiving as a wide (imperfect) duty of virtue, and according to Blöser, this means that Kantian forgiveness is elective in the sense that forgiveness is good in general (i.e. an attitude that we have moral reason to adopt) but without being obligatory in each particular case. In the course of presenting her own reconstruction of Kant’s account, Blöser also objects to some aspects of an interpretation of Kant’s theory of forgiveness which I had previously defended in my paper ‘Forgiveness and Moral Development’ (Philosophia 44:1029–1055, 2016). Although there are a lot of points of agreement between our interpretations, the aim of this article is to highlight four key points of disagreement. These issues are worth discussing because they have implications not only for a plausible interpretation of a recognisable Kantian account of forgiveness but also for wider debates in the contemporary literature on forgiveness. First, I show that Kant is not committed to a form of weak situationism as suggested by Blöser and that Kant’s grounding of the duty to be forgiving does not appeal to moral luck. Second, I argue that although Kant’s duty to be forgiving is elective in one sense of the term, it is not elective in another important sense of the term, and that it is in fact better not to interpret Kantian imperfect duties as being elective. Third, I show that awareness of moral fallibility per se does not provide a morally appropriate ground for forgiveness and offer an alternative reconstruction of Kant’s account- in which fallibility plays a role, but it is not the main reason to forgive. Finally, I argue that Blöser’s account of the need to be forgiven is not recognisable Kantian because, from a Kantian perspective, repentance is a necessary condition for the desirability and, in fact, the very possibility of ameliorating our own guilt.
    • Stanislavski’s creative state on the stage. A spiritual approach to the “system” through practice as research

      Curpan, Gabriela (Taylor & Francis, 2020-01-13)
      This article is a continuation of a previously published one and talks about my own research project, with a focus on various meditation techniques, used as un underlying principle of breath to observe possible spiritual ways of preparing the actor towards what Stanislavski defines as the creative state or as experiencing ‘the life of the human soul’ on the stage. Following the odyssey of the artist from being oneself to becoming the character, my practice as research looks upon how certain spiritual ways (such as meditation) might contribute to their artistic development. It also draws attention on the strange similarities between Christian Orthodox ideas, the Zen Buddhist state of ‘enlightenment’/ ‘zanmai’, and the Stanislavskian creative state.
    • Loneliness and social media: A qualitative investigation of young people's motivations for use and perceptions of social networking sites

      Fox, Bianca; Fox, Bianca (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-01-01)
      The democratisation of Internet access has incrementally changed every domain of activity and has created new business and economic models. From answering work emails to learning a new language, shopping, booking medical appointments or managing one’s finances, almost everything is attainable at the click of a button. The added implications of the rapid rise of social networking websites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat, have further contributed to changing the way we communicate and build new friendships. Indeed most of our social relationships are now being ‘increasingly developed and maintained online’ (Nowland, Necka & Cacioppo, 2017: 1). Ostensibly, despite improved Internet access and enhanced social connectedness, modern societies are struggling to combat loneliness. It is reported to affect people of all ages, especially young adults (16-24 and 25-34 years old) who are avid Internet and social media users (see Office for National Statistics, 2018).
    • "The National Anthem", terrorism and digital media

      Pheasant-Kelly, Frances; McSweeney, Terence; Joy, Stuart (Palgrave, 2019-12-31)
    • Sound objects: Towards procedural audio for and as theatre

      Whitfield, Sarah; Dalgleish, Mat (Innovation in Music Conference 2019/University of West London, 2019-12-05)
      Procedural audio has been the subject of significant contemporary interest, but prior examples in relation to theatre sound are limited. After providing background to theatre sound and procedural audio, we introduce two artefacts, RayGun and INTERIOR, that explore issues around theatre sound. RayGun is an augmented prop prototype that uses sensor driven, procedurally generated and locally diffused sound to address prior deficiencies. INTERIOR reimagines Maurice Maeterlinck’s 1895 play Interior as an embedded, generative and largely procedurally generated audio play housed in a shortwave radio-like artefact. Intended to provide an accessible experience, the listener uses a single knob interface to scan through a soundscape of simulated radio stations and ‘find’ the play. We present some initial findings and conclude with suggestions for future work.
    • #Vaccineswork: Recontextualizing the content of epidemiological reports on Twitter

      Orpin, Deborah; Luzon, Maria Jose; Perez Llantada, Carmen (John Benjamins, 2019-12-04)
      This study examines the ways in which information originating in epidemiological reports is recontextualized in the @ECDC_VPD account, the Twitter account of a European health agency. Using a corpus-assisted discourse analytical approach complemented with multimodal analysis, this study compares the strategies used to achieve proximity (Hyland 2010) in the space-constrained genre of Twitter with those used in the source texts. The study finds that the macro-structural properties of the @ECDC_VPD tweets have become more complex over time and the use of images to enhance meaning-making has increased. The drive to present claims as newsworthy, coupled with the 140/280-character constraint, results in the tweets containing greater relative use of stance markers and lower use of epistemic modals than is observed in the source texts. The @ECDC_VPD tweets display a greater range of engagement strategies than is seen in the source texts.
    • Jesus

      Gregg, Stephen; Gregg, Stephen; Chryssides, George (Bloomsbury, 2019-11-14)
      It should come as no surprise that a volume on Christians requires a chapter on Jesus, called the Christ by his earliest followers in the movement that would later be labelled Christianity, and upon whom much of Christian scholarship and identity rests. However, in keeping with the Lived-Religion approach of this work, I shall be exploring the diversity of interpretations of Jesus that have impacted upon everyday Christians’ lives, rather than the grand historical or theological narratives that have been preferenced in previous generations of scholarship. Jesus matters to Christians. Interpretations of his life, teachings, death and resurrection sit at the heart of many individual Christians’ daily lives, and their relationship with God and each other. It is not for nothing that many Christians ask, ‘What Would Jesus Do?’ when making decisions in their everyday lives. But to which Jesus are we referring? Whilst this volume moves beyond the theological paradigms of previous approaches to Christianity, we may still learn from this body of scholarship. In his seminal chapter, originally published in 1972, Don Cupitt outlined the diversity of Christian responses to Jesus using the famous title ‘One Jesus, Many Christs?’ Intriguingly formulated as a question, Cupitt was arguing for a liberalization of theological approaches, not to the historical figure, but to the myriad interpretations of that figure through a diversity of social, political and religious contexts. In this chapter, I wish to continue in the spirit of Cupitt, not to write theology as he was doing, but to unpack the Lived Religion-in-action of numerous Christian individuals and communities that represent this broad spectrum of interpretations of Jesus – indeed, Jesuses – so as to understand the lived realities of relationships with Jesus for everyday Christians.
    • Vernacular Christianity

      Gregg, Stephen; Chryssides, George; Gregg, Stephen; Chryssides, George (Bloomsbury, 2019-11-14)
      One of the authors used to begin his Christianity classes by inviting students to consider two statements and to decide which provided a more appropriate description of the Christian faith. The two statements were: (1) Christians believe that Jesus Christ is of one substance with the Father. (2) Christians in Britain eat Christmas puddings on 25 December. By far the majority of students voted for the first statement. It is an important doctrine, defining the Incarnation, which is a central tenet of Christian theology, and it is part of the Nicene Creed, which many Christians recite weekly during congregational worship. By contrast, the second seems frivolous. Christianity purports to offer salvation, teaching that it is brought about through God becoming human, and dying on the cross to redeem humankind from sin; this is certainly not achieved by eating a Christmas pudding. One might also point out that, historically, the Church has excommunicated those who have denied the full deity or the full humanity of Jesus Christ, whereas there is no compulsion for any Christian to observe popular Christmas customs. However, it remains true that there are more Christians who erect Christmas trees and hang up stockings than understand what it means for Jesus Christ to be of one substance with the Father, or indeed most of the other doctrines defined in the traditional creeds.