• 'Made to think and forced to feel': The power of counter-ritual

      Dhanda, Meena; Rathore, Aakash Singh (Oxford University Press, 2020-04-14)
      Dr Ambedkar argued that habitual conduct with the backing of religion is not easy to change and that salvation will come only if the caste Hindu is ‘made to think and is forced to feel that he must alter his ways’. He meant that the casteist conduct of the ‘caste Hindu’ is hard to change because it springs from an ingrained habit of mind. The impetus to change ways can come from unexpected contingencies: impersonal political junctures, very personal histories, inter-personal challenges, intra-group skirmishes, a whole network of factors that brings the habitual conduct of caste up for scrutiny. This mix of factors is quite complicated in the U.K. where I am located as a researcher and academic, regularly engaging with the public. We need to think through the means of defiance against systematic oppression and stigmatisation of people on the basis of caste. In this paper I will reflect upon whether caste might be disrupted in its everyday reproduction through the use of counter-rituals.
    • Loneliness and social media: A qualitative investigation of young people's motivations for use and perceptions of social networking sites

      Fox, Bianca; Fox, Bianca (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-01-01)
      The democratisation of Internet access has incrementally changed every domain of activity and has created new business and economic models. From answering work emails to learning a new language, shopping, booking medical appointments or managing one’s finances, almost everything is attainable at the click of a button. The added implications of the rapid rise of social networking websites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat, have further contributed to changing the way we communicate and build new friendships. Indeed most of our social relationships are now being ‘increasingly developed and maintained online’ (Nowland, Necka & Cacioppo, 2017: 1). Ostensibly, despite improved Internet access and enhanced social connectedness, modern societies are struggling to combat loneliness. It is reported to affect people of all ages, especially young adults (16-24 and 25-34 years old) who are avid Internet and social media users (see Office for National Statistics, 2018).
    • Supernatural surveillance and blood-borne disease in Bram Stoker’s Dracula: Reflections on mesmerism and HIV

      Pheasant-Kelly, Frances (Intellect Publishers, 2019-12-31)
      While the relationship between surveillance and/or voyeuristic viewing, control and horror is central to certain horror productions, including Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960), My Little Eye (Evans, 2002) and District 9 (Blomkamp, 2009), it is less obvious in the vampire film. However, the vampiric gaze exerts a more immediate and absolute form of power, causing its victims to fall prey to inevitable death and an extended afterlife. Although all vampire films tend to exploit these mesmeric aspects of Victorian culture, Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992), directed by Frances Ford Coppola, progresses the notion of ‘supernatural surveillance’. Coppola uses numerous creative visual techniques to accentuate the attention to eyes, notably in scenes that are linked to sexual desire and promiscuity. If the original novel implicitly reflected contemporaneous fears of venereal infection, namely syphilis, then Coppola’s film is preoccupied with AIDS. This article argues that the film’s attention to eyes and the gaze not only reflects the mesmerism associated with Victorian culture but also resonates with new forms of sociocultural watchfulness emerging in the AIDS era of the twentieth century.
    • "The National Anthem", terrorism and digital media

      Pheasant-Kelly, Frances; McSweeney, Terence; Joy, Stuart (Palgrave, 2019-12-31)
    • Drums sound in Hackensack: Agnes de Mille and the Jooss Ballet

      Lidbury, Clare (Taylor & Francis, 2019-12-31)
      In 1941 Agnes de Mille created Drums Sound in Hackensack for the Jooss Ballet. There is no film of the work and few photographs but the work is documented in her choreographic notes, letters to and from de Mille, dancers’ recollections, and reviews. From these can be learned why and how de Mille created the work, what it was like, and why it was significant to the Jooss Ballet. With its American theme, historical setting, dream sequence, and a female character at the center of the work it may be seen as a forgotten stepping stone in de Mille’s choreographic development.
    • Vilnius memoryscape: razing and raising of monuments, collective memory and national identity.

      Moore, Irina (John Benjamins Publishing, 2019-12-31)
      This article attempts to analyse collective memory formation (the study of monuments, memory, and public space) through the lens of semiotic landscape. A theoretical focus on power relations in “monumental politics” (Czepczyński, 2008; Forest, Johnson & Till, 2004; Gordon, 2001; Kaufman, 2001), the concept of memoryscape (Clack, 2011) and Van Gennep’s sociological concept of liminality (Van Gennep, A., 2004) and a methodological approach that “treats space as a discursive as well as physical formation” (Jaworski, A., Thurlow, C., 2010) are combined to examine the process of monument destruction, creation, and alteration in post-Soviet Vilnius.
    • Talking textiles, making value: Catalysing fashion, dress, and textiles heritage in the Midlands

      Hackney, Fiona; Bloodworth, Jo; Baines, Emily; Howard, Catherine; Anderson, Claire (Taylor & Francis, 2019-12-31)
      There are hundreds of small museums, archives, and collections in the English Midlands, United Kingdom (UK), many of which are the legacy of the region’s rich industrial heritage. A surprising number of these include dress and textiles in various forms, from the costume collection of Charles Paget-Wade at Berrington Hall (Leominster) to intricately stitched smocks made by local needlewomen in Herefordshire, and the wealth of manufacturers’ samples that comprise the silk ribbon trade archive at the Herbert Museum, Coventry. These are challenging times for many such organisations as they face cutbacks in staff and local authority funding. Yet they offer a unique and largely unexploited resource for staff, students, and researchers in art and design higher education (HE), not only for primary research but also as a catalyst for design innovation. The discussion here, which takes the format of group research practitioner interview, builds on a Knowledge Exchange event that was held December 2017 at the Fashion Lab, University of Wolverhampton (UoW). The event brought together a diverse group of fashion and textiles professionals to talk, exchange ideas, take part in object handling sessions, mind-map, and brain-storm how to catalyse connections between heritage collections and higher education and build value. With seed funding from the Museum-University Partnership Initiative (MUPI) (see National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement - NCCPE 2019), the day built on a series of scoping visits to collections in the region undertaken by Professor Fiona Hackney and Dr Emily Baines. The group involved staff, students and museum professionals including those from UoW, De Montfort University (DMU), Hereford College of Arts (HCA), Nottingham Trent University (NTU), artist Ruth Singer who leads the Arts Council-funded Criminal Quilts project in association with Staffordshire Record Office (Singer 2019), and representatives from Herefordshire Museum Service, the Herbert Gallery (Coventry), Walsall Museums Service, the Lace Guild Stourbridge, and Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. The following conversation reflects themes that emerged in the project including: the need to embed archival work and primary research in fashion and textiles curricula at all levels, the development of hubs to connect university research with museum practice, the added value of artist-led projects, and the significance of place-based textiles heritage as a catalyst for new business and sustainable design practice.
    • #Vaccineswork: Recontextualizing the content of epidemiological reports on Twitter

      Orpin, Deborah; Luzon, Maria Jose; Perez Llantada, Carmen (John Benjamins, 2019-12-15)
      This study examines the ways in which information originating in epidemiological reports is recontextualized in the @ECDC_VPD account, the Twitter account of a European health agency. Using a corpus-assisted discourse analytical approach complemented with multimodal analysis, this study compares the strategies used to achieve proximity (Hyland 2010) in the space-constrained genre of Twitter with those used in the source texts. The study finds that the macro-structural properties of the @ECDC_VPD tweets have become more complex over time and the use of images to enhance meaning-making has increased. The drive to present claims as newsworthy, coupled with the 140/280-character constraint, results in the tweets containing greater relative use of stance markers and lower use of epistemic modals than is observed in the source texts. The @ECDC_VPD tweets display a greater range of engagement strategies than is seen in the source texts.
    • Theatre and Performance

      Black, Daisy; Capern, Amanda L (Routledge, 2019-11-08)
    • Jack’s Jumper: designing a sensibility for sustainable clothing communities

      Hackney, Fiona; Hill, Katie; Saunders, Clare (IFFTI, 2019-11-04)
      Jack’s Jumper is a short film co-produced by an emergent community of participant researchers and film-makers R&A Collaborations as part of S4S Designing a Sensibility for Sustainable Clothing, an Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded research project. The need to improve the sustainability of fashion has been widely noted by academics (Black 2012; Fletcher 2008 and 2016), activist campaigns (Greenpeace and Fashion Revolution) and policy makers (Environmental Audit Committee Report on the Sustainability of the Fashion Industry, 2019). In this project the authors combine arts and social science methods, including film making, to develop a methodology for pro-environmental behaviour change and sustainable fashion through, literally and metaphorically, making a new relationship with clothes. The paper outlines the aims and purpose of the project and its methods, which include fashion design workshops designed to mimic phases of the lifecycle of clothing (making fibre and fabric, pattern cutting, mending, modifying, repurposing and clothes), films, wardrobe audits, clothing diaries and surveys. It focuses on the series of over twenty short films, including Jack’s Jumper, to consider how they might function not only as reflective devices for those involved in the project and emotional prompts for future action, but also as an affective means of building and developing a sustainable fashion sensibility among wider audiences, and the role of aesthetics and emotion in this. As such, we argue that creative participatory fashion design practices are potentially an important tool for generating a sensibility of sustainability and therefore for informing policy on behaviour change.
    • World’s end: punk films from London and New York, 1977-1984

      Halligan, Benjamin; McKay, George; Arnold, Gina (Oxford University Press, 2019-11-01)
      Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, 1977) concludes with the protagonist, seemingly weary of the company of his delinquent friends (given over to gang violence and gang rape, and in the wake of the needless death of the youngest and most disorientated), finding a moment of peace in the apartment of his previously unenthused girlfriend. They have reconciled, a future together has begun, and “How Deep is Your Love” by the Bee Gees – a major international chart hit of 1977 – plays over the closing credits. The couple’s connection was initially based on shared disco dancing abilities, and their get-togethers on the dance floor and in the dance studio have offered the opportunity of an escape for each. For Tony Manero (John Travolta), the escape is from his underpaid blue-collar job and suffocating family tensions – where his life at home, as a second-generation Italian immigrant, seems like stepping back into the old country for family meals, in sharp contrast to the grooming he devotes to his appearance, upstairs in his bedroom. Once outside, the very streets of New York seem to have been recast as a dance floor – via mobile shots of Travolta’s feet, pacing with a cocksure swagger to the beat of the Bee Gees soundtrack. For Stephanie Mangano (Karen Lynn Gorney), the escape is from more obscure forms of patriarchal exploitation, enacted via her aspirations to a glamourous and independent life, which can be read as calibrated to an imagining of the nightclub Studio 54 (which opened in 1977), not least in her celebrity name-dropping and initial distaste for her uncultured suitor. The final shot of Saturday Night Fever frames the couple in her apartment: polished wooden floors, exposed brick walls, a healthy rubber plant, an acoustic guitar resting against a sofa, and a window ledge looking out across Manhattan – a much more desirable locale than the film’s initial setting of Tony’s Brooklyn (see Figure 1). In short, to return to “How Deep is Your Love”, the couple have realised that they were “living in a world of fools / breaking us down when they all should let us be / [since] we belong to you and me”, and enshrine this shared sentiment in domestication. The New York of 1977 has tested them and their success in meeting this test has allowed them to take a synchronised step forward, and establish themselves on an upwardly mobile trajectory.
    • Always on: Capitalist continuity and Its discontents

      Penzin, Alexei; Kholeif, Omar; Sarkisov, Karen (Prestel Publishing, 2019-09-03)
      Why should we critically reflect on continuity today? To immediately address the central point, it suffices to invoke the issues and standpoints that occupy radical theorists today, such as the direct, impassionate question, When and how will capitalism finally end? Another widespread articulation of the same concern would range from the different obscure claims about “living in the end times,” stemming from politico-eschatological perspectives of capitalism’s self-destructiveness, to hard evidence of disaster capitalism’s devastation and destabilization of the natural world. In a less theoretical but more pointed form, this central concern has been echoed in people’s responses to the greedy, cynical warmongering of recent times, new right-wing populist deceptions of the dispossessed masses, and the incredible burgeoning of inequality worldwide. These versions of desperate wondering could be summed up in the question, When will this massive, repetitive absurdity end? Today, this end is imagined in less utopian, inspiring shapes than before, ranging from explosive, unpredictable technological acceleration, random catastrophes, and ecological disaster to more sober discussions about the opportunities for a renewed radical politics.
    • Associations between balance ability and dance performance using field balance tests

      Clarke, Frances; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wilson, Margaret; Wyon, Matthew (Science & Medicine, 2019-09-01)
      Purpose: Although balance is a key element of dance, it remains to be confirmed which balance components are associated with dance performance. The aim of this study was to assess the associations between different balance field tests and dance performance in an in-house measure in ballet, contemporary and jazz genres. Methods: 83 female undergraduate dance students (20±1.5 years; 163.04±6.59 cm; 60.97±10.76 kg) were subjected to the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), the Airplane test, a dance-specific pirouette test, the modified Romberg test, and the BioSway Balance System (Biodex, USA). The results from these balance tests were compared to the participants’ technique and repertoire performance scores in ballet, contemporary, and jazz genres. Results: Ballet scores were best predicted by SEBT 90˚ and Romberg for technique (r = 0.4, p = 0.001, SEE ±2.49) and Romberg, SEBT 90˚, and SEBT 225˚ for repertoire (r = 0.51, p = 0.001, SEE±1.99). Contemporary data indicated SEBT 90˚ and Romberg for technique (r = 0.37, p = 0.001, SEE±2.67) and SEBT 225˚ for repertoire (r = 0.27, p = 0.015, SEE±2.29). Jazz indicated SEBT 90˚, Romberg, SEBT 315˚, and SEBT 225˚ for technique (r = 0.51, p = 0.001, SEE±2.28) and SEBT 225˚ and Romberg for repertoire (r = 0.41, p = 0.001, SEE±2.29). Conclusion: The present study suggests that balance ability has a limited influence on dance performance, with existing field balance tests demonstrating low to moderate associations with dance technique and repertoire.
    • Thermogenic capacity of human white-fat: the actual picture

      Dinas, Petros C; Krase, Argyro; Nintou, Eleni; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Granzotto, Marnie; Metaxas, Marinos; Karachaliou, Eleni; Rossato, Marco; Vettor, Roberto; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; et al. (MDPI AG, 2019-08-29)
      Cold exposure and exercise may increase thermogenic capacity of white adipose tissue (WAT), which could subsequently enhance energy expenditure and body weight loss. We aimed to identify possible alterations in uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)—the main biomarker of thermogenic activation—in human WAT due to both cold exposure and exercise, as well as the link between environmental temperature and thermogenic capacity of human WAT. MATERIAL & METHOD: We conducted four human experimental studies and two systematic reviews and meta-analyses—PROSPERO registration CRD42019120116, CRD42019120213. RESULTS: UCP1 mRNA was higher in winter than in summer [t(30) = 2.232, p = 0.03] in human WAT and our meta-analysis showed a main effect of cold exposure on human UCP1 mRNA [standard mean difference (Std-md) = 1.81, confidence interval (CI) = 0.50–3.13, p = 0.007]. However, UCP1 mRNA/protein expressions displayed no associations with %fat mass or BMI (p > 0.05, Cohen’s f2 < 0.20). Both a 2-hour cooling and a non-cooling protocol preceding the positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) measurements revealed no association between environmental temperature and standardised uptake value (SUVmax) of human WAT, as well as no mean differences in SUVmax-WAT-activity between winter and summer. An 8-week exercise program had no effect on UCP1 of human WAT or on body composition. Our meta-analysis also revealed: (a) no effect of chronic exercise on human UCP1 mRNA, (b) a main effect of chronic exercise on UCP1 protein concentrations (Std-md = 0.59, CI = 0.03–1.16, p = 0.04) and UCP1 mRNA (Std-md = 1.76, CI = 0.48–3.04, p = 0.007) in WAT of normal diet animals, c) a main effect of chronic exercise on UCP1 mRNA (Std-md = 2.94, CI = 0.24–5.65, p = 0.03) and UCP1 protein concentrations (Std-md = 2.06, CI = 0.07–4.05, p = 0.04) of high-fat diet animals. CONCLUSIONS: Cold exposure represents a main stimulus for increased thermogenic capacity in human white adipocytes; however, this may have no impact on body weight loss. Chronic exercise may represent no major stimulus for UCP1 induced in human white adipocytes, while in animals it increases UCP1 gene independently of their diet. Therefore, evidence from animal studies regarding UCP1 gene activation in white adipocytes may not be applicable in humans. Finally, the identification of human WAT thermogenic capacity via PET/CT examination may be optimal with both a cooling and a non-cooling protocol.
    • The influence of Christian Orthodox thought on Stanislavski’s theatrical legacy

      Curpan, Gabriela (Informa UK Limited, 2019-08-01)
      Expressed through many Orthodox concepts, such as ‘soul’, ‘heart’, ‘love’, ‘beauty’ and ‘truth’, scattered throughout all his writings, Stanislavski’s personal religious feelings seemed constantly to have shaped his life-long sense of an artistic spirituality. Yet, in spite of this presence, the Orthodox connections appear to be neither properly analysed nor fully explained. Therefore, this paper strives to identify and reflect upon how such generally ignored but key Orthodox ideas might have had a crucial influence on shaping Stanislavski’s ‘system’.
    • Selling a dream? Information asymmetry and integrity within promotional literature for popular music courses

      Hall, Richard (Intellect Books, 2019-07-01)
      Providers of higher education have a legal responsibility to provide accurate information to students. In an increasingly marketized sector, however, promotional imperatives place pressure on providers to ‘sell’ degrees to students. Given the indeterminate nature of popular music careers, not to mention the ‘intangible product’ that is Higher Education, the implicit or explicit indication of an assurance of career success upon completion of the degree could be regarded as being overstated. This article brings to bear a qualitative linguistic analysis of the terms and constructed meanings implied within promotional literature across a range of performance-based popular music degrees. It suggests that language in this context functions in a performative sense and can perpetuate questionable conceptions of popular music careers and the efficacy of degree courses. The article concludes with suggestions of improvements that might be made across the sector in the promotion of popular music degree courses.
    • MAMIC goes live: a music programming system for non-specialist delivery

      Dalgleish, Mathew,; Spencer, Steve,; Foster, Chris.; Payne, Chris; Hepworth-Sawyer, Russ; Hodgson, Jay; Paterson, Justin; Toulson, Rob (CRC Press, 2019-06-21)
      The computing curriculum in England has shifted from “software training” to a model where children learn to code as a way of understanding underlying principles. This has created challenges for primary school teaching practitioners, many of whom require upskilling. The Music And Math In Collaboration (MAMIC) project addresses these issues via a custom library for the Pure Data (Pd) visual programming environment that interconnects key musical, mathematical and coding concepts within a unified environment that is able to be delivered by non-specialist teachers. Initial findings from deployment “in the wild” (i.e. in situ) are presented and future work is discussed.
    • “I’m Gonna Shake and Shimmy” or may be not: choreographing Hairspray–a practice as research project

      Lidbury, C (Informa UK Limited, 2019-06-03)
      © 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Using practice as research as my methodology I examine whether it is possible to choreograph Hairspray - the Musical while staying true to the movement principles developed by Kurt Jooss and Sigurd Leeder in the Jooss-Leeder Method. In discussing the process and the product I explore also the difficulties in choreographing for, and teaching the dances to, a cast of 15–18-year-olds in a school where there is no dance in the curriculum at this level. I conclude that selected Jooss-Leeder movement principles provide a useful framework for choreographing the musical numbers, that Leeder’s organic teaching process is effective for these novice dancers and that a lack of dance experience does not preclude a successful production.
    • The Making Affect: a co-created community methodology

      Hackney, Fiona; Chakrabarti, Amaresh; Chakrabarti, Debkumar (Springer, 2019-05-13)
    • Signifying Trauma in the Post-9/11 Combat Film: The Hurt Locker and In the Valley of Elah

      Pheasant-Kelly, Frances (Routledge, 2019-05-13)
      This article addresses two Iraq War films, The Hurt Locker (Bigelow 2008) and In the Valley of Elah (Haggis 2007), through the lens of trauma theory. Uniquely, it engages with Slavoj Žižek’s account of the Real in its analysis of how victim/perpetrator trauma is signified in their respective narrative structures and visual style. The primary argument is that the pattern of traumatic memory is reflected in their narrative modes. At the same time, it claims that the unfolding narrative of In the Valley of Elah mimics certain forms of trauma treatment, operating in a therapeutic mode for its characters (as well as offering narrative resolution for spectators). Such analysis of trauma differs from other scholarly approaches to these films that have variously considered them from perspectives of: embodiment in the war film (Burgoyne 2012); the ethics of viewing traumatic suffering (Straw 2011); the de-politicisation of torture by the inclusion of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Barker 2011); indifference to post-9/11 war films as an inability to respond to the trauma and loss that terrorism poses (Toffoletti and Grace 2010); trauma and the militarised body (Andreescu 2016); and the narration of trauma in Iraq War Films (Kopka 2018).