• The entertainment press

      Glen, Patrick; Conboy, Martin; Bingham, Adrian (University of Edinburgh, 2020-11-30)
      Coleman joined the Melody Maker at their Fleet Street office in 1960, and at first found it hard to adjust to a different style of showbiz journalism. He couldn't see what was ‘newsworthy’ about a string of Cliff Richard tour dates and preferred to stir up a row with the BBC or research a heavily angled investigation into the music business. Feeling frustrated, he planned to defect to the Daily Telegraph. Then he encountered a classic put-down from a Telegraph executive at his job interview. Asked where he worked, he replied: ‘The Melody Maker.’ And before that? ‘The Manchester Evening News.’ After a long pause, the executive inquired icily: ‘Tell me, Mr Coleman, why did you leave journalism?’ The anecdote, taken from Roy Coleman’s obituary (Independent 13 September 1996) reveals a common preconception about the entertainment press: it was a journalistic backwater, a place for fanatics and second-rate journalists, where publishers made easy money. The view misses the significance of a medium where the entertainment industry and the public came together to discuss the creative practices, performances and commercial products of artistes. These journalistic and publishing practices were not performed in isolation: the entertainment press, often implicitly but also knowingly, constructed and represented broader understandings of society, politics and culture.
    • Sustainability awareness, management practices and organisational culture in hotels: Evidence from developing countries

      Oriade, Ade; Osinaike, Adesola; Aduhene, Ken; Wang, Yong (Elsevier, 2020-11-02)
      The subject of sustainability and it its management in the hotel context is somewhat volatile with varied evidence in support of different viewpoints. This study, adopting Situated Cognition (SC), explores the role of organisational culture in sustainability practice and awareness among hotel practitioners. The findings from this study reveal that management practice of sustainability has strong relationship with both organisational culture and employees’ sustainability awareness. However, organisational culture only mediates the relationship between sustainability awareness and management on country to country basis. The study recommends that owner-managers need to realise the importance of building up a robust organisational culture particularly in support of their sustainability management and empowerment of their staff.
    • Digital banking and customer satisfaction: the Nigerian perspective

      Jones, Mordi; Oriade, Ade; Wang, Yong; Atiase, Victor; Thaichon, P; Ratten, V (Routledge, 2020-10-30)
      The emergence of Internet-Based Technology (I-BT) into the Nigerian banking industry over the past decade has diversified and revolutionised the sector by offering consumers various choices of accessing banking services. Drawing on three main theories namely the Expectancy Disconfirmation (ED), the Affect and Kahn’s Engagement Theory, we examine the impact of I-BT on customer satisfaction (CS) in the Nigerian Banking Sector. Employing a quantitative research methodology, data for our empirical inquiry come from a survey of 426 bank customers in Edo State, Nigeria. Following both bank users and banks in search of effective ways to maximising customer satisfaction, we show in this study why I-BT is likely to have a positive impact on bank customer service delivery in Nigeria. First, our data evidence suggests that all the latent variables of customer-focused engagement behaviour (CFEBEH), positive and consistently helpful behaviour (PCHB), attachment to the task itself (ATI) and working smart (WS) correlate positively with CS and explain 39% of the variance in I-BT. Second, CFEBEH has a direct effect on CS at a 40% level. Finally, concerning the mediating role of I-BT resources in the bank, the results indicate that there is an indirect and positive effect on CFEBEH and CS at a 6.7% mediation level. Nevertheless, Nigerian banks are beset with various infrastructural difficulties in implementing full digital banking services. We conclude by delineating some relevant implications of our study to the theory and practice of CS and the engagement of I-BT in banking operations.
    • Weaving through the web: How students navigate information online in the twenty-first century

      Bailey, C; Bowley, H; Withers, J; Bartram, Brendan (Routledge, 2020-10-30)
      This chapter investigates the processes students employ when searching online for information to include in an academic essay. Against a backdrop of literature from the past three decades, we present findings from a recent observational study (employing screen-recording software and stimulated recall) of how students approach a writing-from-sources task, supplemented by interviews with librarians at a post-1992 UK university. We discuss three aspects of our participants’ search for sources: where they searched, how they searched and which sources they selected. Our participants displayed a wide range of skill levels and approaches to searching, and in some cases a high degree of persistence. We highlight the information literacy challenges they faced, and suggest how some of these could be addressed.
    • The determinants of services FDI location in the UK regions

      Cook, Mark; Fallon, Grahame (Inderscience, 2020-10-28)
      This paper contributes to scholarly knowledge and understanding of the way in which economic conditions and government policy affect foreign direct investment (FDI) location in the United Kingdom (UK) regions. It does so by exploring their impact on inbound services FDI location in a sample of the UKs core (the Southeast) and non-core (West Midlands; Wales; Scotland and the Northwest) regions. Use is made of multiple regression techniques to analyse a set of official, longitudinal data gathered for the period from 1980 to 2015 as a means to this end. The findings offer new insights into the relative influence of the search for markets, efficiencies and strategic assets and government policy over the location of services FDI in all five regions. The resultant implications for future inward investment policy development after the UK leaves the EU are also considered, including the potential benefits of increasing policy variations from region to region.
    • 'I'm not going to tell you cos you need to think about this': A conversation analysis study of managing advice resistance and supporting autonomy in undergraduate supervision

      West, Marion (Springer, 2020-10-27)
      This article firstly, critically analyses a face-to-face supervision meeting between an undergraduate and a supervisor, exploring how the supervisor handles the twin strategies of fostering autonomy while managing resistance to advice. Conversation Analysis is used as both a theory and a method, with a focus on the use of accounts to support or resist advice. The main contribution is the demonstration of how both the supervisor and student are jointly responsible for the negotiation of advice, which is recycled and calibrated in response to the student’s resistance. The supervisor defuses complaints by normalising them, and moving his student on to practical solutions, often with humour. He lists his student’s achievements as the foundation on which she can assert agency and build the actions he recommends. Supervisor-student relationships are investigated through the lens of the affective dimensions of learning, to explore how caring or empathy may serve to reduce resistance and make advice more palatable. By juxtaposing physically present supervision with digitally-mediated encounters, while acknowledging their mutual entanglement, the postdigital debate is furthered. In the context of Covid-19, and rapid decisions by universities to bring in digital platforms to capture student-teacher interactions, the analysis presented is in itself an act of resistance against the technical control systems of the academy and algorithmic capitalism.
    • Dying to Talk? Co-producing resources with young people to get them talking about bereavement, death and dying

      Booth, Jane; Croucher, Karina; Bryant, Eleanor (Policy Press, 2020-10-26)
      The Dying to Talk project in Bradford, UK aimed to build resilience in young people around the topic of death, dying and bereavement. Starting conversations early in life could buttress people’s future wellbeing when faced with bereavement and indeed their own mortality. Research indicates that a key feature in young people’s experience of bereavement is ‘powerlessness’ (Ribbens McCarthy, 2007). Drawing on the principles of co-production, young people led the development of the project aimed at encouraging young people to talk about death, using archaeology as a facilitator to those conversations. The partnership between the University of Bradford, the voluntary sector and the young people proved to be a positive and empowering one. It laid the foundations for future collaboration and developed a framework for engaging young people in talking about death, building their resilience for dealing with death and dying in the future – a step towards building a ‘compassionate city’ for young people (Kellehear, 2012).
    • Wolverhampton Law Journal: open access to law research

      Potocnik, Metka (University of Wolverhampton, 2020-10-19)
    • Revisiting the history of the British coal industry: the politics of legacy, memory and heritage

      Gildart, Keith; Perchard, Andrew; Curtis, Ben; Millar, Grace (Waseda University Japan, 2020-10-12)
      This paper revisits the history of the British coal industry in the context of deindustrialisation, ruptures in electoral politics, and attempts by former miners to preserve a mining past. Methodologically it draws on an oral history project that involved over 100 participants in England, Scotland and Wales. The life stories conveyed by the former miners provide entry points to various aspects of the industrial, social and cultural life of coal communities. The specific focus here is on the ways in which the miners themselves are striving to create and curate their own stories and experiences through local heritage projects in the town of Leigh in north west England and the former mining villages of the north Wales coast. The interviews are indicative of the sense of the isolation they continue to experience in the contemporary economic context of deindustrialisation and challenges to their sense of class, community and nation. Tensions between former miners and the wider social and political culture of their communities hinge on narratives and histories of the 1984/5 miners’ strike. Heritage projects developed in both localities have become battlegrounds for what kind of history should be presented to the public, where memorials should be located, and which memories and experiences should be preserved. Miners who took part in the strike understandably want to centre their histories and narratives through the lens of 1984/5, while those who continued to work through the dispute argue that it should be given a more marginal position in commemoration and heritage. The interviews offer more complex readings of the social and cultural politics of the coal industry and challenge some of the prevailing orthodoxies in the historiography
    • Terrorism

      Kassimeris, George; Featherstone, Kevin; Sotiropoulos, Dimitri A.; University of Wolverhampton (Oxford University Press, 2020-10-08)
      The chapter places Greek terrorism in a broader political and cultural perspective in order to explain why it has become a permanent fixture of Greek contemporary life. Revolutionary terrorism in Greece resulted from a complex series of political conditions and longstanding cultural influences that drew politically active individuals towards the utopian world of revolutionary protest and violence. These conditions and influences provided the foundations upon which extreme Left terrorism took firm root in the mid-1970s and are analysed in depth and placed within the wider context of the evolution of the Greek political culture within the last forty years, especially the years following the Civil War and the collapse of the Colonels’ dictatorial regime in 1974. The chapter also brings up to date the trajectory of Greek terrorism, by analysing the country’s new generation of urban guerrilla groups and defining what these new groups and their leaders seek to achieve, what motivates them, and how they compare with their predecessors.
    • Islam and anticolonial rebellions in north and west Africa, 1914-1918

      Krause, Jonathan (Cambridge University Press, 2020-10-01)
      European empires experienced widespread anticolonial rebellions during the First World War. These rebellions occurred for many different reasons, reflecting the diversity of context and history across colonial societies in Africa and Asia. Religion naturally played a strong role in most of the anticolonial rebellions during the First World War, most prominently Islam. This article looks at the role Islam played in two key anticolonial rebellions in North and West Africa: the rebellions in Batna, Algeria and the Kaocen War in Niger, respectively. The article examines how Islam was instrumentalized by rebels, imperial collaborators, and French officers and administrators to further their own ends. Rebels called upon Islam to help inspire anticolonial movements, to bind together diverse populations, and to contextualise their actions in wider socio-political conflicts. Imperial collaborators likewise called on religious authority to assist with European imperial recruitment efforts. French officers and administrators used Islam both as a justification and a target for collective punishment and repression after the rebellions were put down from 1917. This repression is still under-studied in a period usually portrayed as evidencing broad imperial harmony, rather than violent extraction and oppression.
    • Editorial

      Oriade, A; Robinson, P; Clegg, A (Inderscience, 2020-10-01)
    • Evidence-based organizational change and development: is evidence-based OCD a reality or mere rhetoric?

      Hamlin, Robert G.; Jones, Jenni; Ellinger, Andrea D. (European Association of People Management, the University Forum for Human Resource Development and the World Federation of People Management Associations, 2020-09-30)
      This article discusses the compelling need for, and demonstrates, the significant practical 'reality' of evidence-based organizational change and development (EBOCD). It offers a summary of a previously conducted analysis that resulted in 10 validated 'original' and 10 'new' emergent common 'insights' and 'lessons learned' on the effective formulation and implementation of OCD initiatives. These were deduced from 'critical perspectives' and 'reflective case histories' of EBOCD practice offered by over 70 evidence-based organizational leaders/managers, HRD professionals and change management consultants. The article concludes with several recommendations for those engaged in OCD change agency practice
    • Shaping our academic future

      Brunson, Jeremy; Roy, Cynthia; Stone, Christopher (WASLI, 2020-09-13)
      Many countries around the world struggle to provide Deaf people with qualified interpreters. Those who are institutionalizing a solution for this often do so through Interpreter Education Programs (IEPs) and typically situate their philosophy within a skill based training- interpreting. We suggest this presents a myopic view of interpreting; a view that assumes language and interaction occur within a vacuum. Therefore, we believe a more useful paradigm under which to teach interpreting is a theoretical-based education- Interpreting Studies (IS). In order to do this, educators and students must be able to define Interpreting Studies and recognize the contribution of various disciplines that make up this field. Embedding these disciplines within IS requires grounding in each discipline's theoretical principles which is significant as the education of interpreters takes hold in academia.
    • Tackling the global challenge of illegal wildlife trafficking and trade

      Mbzibain, Aurelian; Mohsen Mohamed, Habiba (University of Wolverhampton Centre for International Development & Training (CIDT), 2020-09-09)
    • The good character backstop: directions, defeasibility and frameworks of fairness

      Glover, Richard (Cambridge University Press, 2020-09-04)
      This paper examines the law on good character evidence in criminal trials through a discussion of the important but under-analysed case of Hunter, in which a five-judge Court of Appeal sought to clarify the law on good character directions to the jury. However, it is argued here that the judgment conflicts with the leading House of Lords decision in Aziz. The paper considers how the court misinterpreted the law and, in particular, the defeasible nature of the rule in Aziz and the impact of the Criminal Justice Act 2003. As a result, the circumstances in which a good character direction will be provided have diminished significantly. It is argued that this has important implications for the right to a fair trial, as good character directions act as a ‘backstop’ against miscarriages of justice. They also form a vital part of the ‘framework of fairness’ considered necessary, in lieu of reasoned jury verdicts, by the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights in Taxquet v Belgium. Accordingly, it is contended that Aziz rather than Hunter should be followed so that, where there is evidence of good character, a direction is normally provided as a matter of law.
    • Keeping the faith: A history of northern soul

      Gildart, Keith; Catterall, Stephen (Manchester University Press, 2020-08-13)
      In the 1970s, Northern Soul held a pivotal position in British youth culture. It originated in the English north west and midlands in the late-1960s, and by 1976, it was attracting thousands of enthusiasts across the country. They flocked to hundreds of venues where ‘rare soul’ records, by predominantly black performers recorded mostly between 1964-68, were spun by ‘disc jockeys’ (DJs) who became legends of the scene. For much of the 1970s Northern Soul was largely ignored by the national music press and found little space in the wider media. The lack of awareness and marginalisation of Northern Soul in the lexicon of youth culture and popular music was linked to three inter-related factors. First, the scene predominated outside of London and was most prominent at the margins of cities and towns of the midlands (Wolverhampton, Stoke-On-Trent) and the north west (Wigan, Blackpool). Secondly, it was a retrospective scene that was steeped in nostalgia, locality and an identity that could not easily be absorbed by other music scenes and related youth subcultures. Thirdly, Northern Soul was largely a working class scene, which did not produce influential intellectuals and commentators that would proselytise on its behalf in newspapers, magazines and television shows. In popular characterisations of post-war youth culture and popular music there is an orthodox chronology that stretches from Teddy Boys/Rock ‘n’ Roll in the 1950s, the Mods and Rockers and the counter-culture/hippy scene of the 1960s and on to punk rock in the 1970s. Yet in 1976/77 the ground zero for punk rock, Northern Soul was arguably far bigger in terms of the number of specialist venues, participants, and organisations that gave the scene a distinct identity
    • Rights, responsibilities and religion in a mid-Victorian convict prison

      Cox, David J (University of Wolverhampton, 2020-08-11)
      This article investigates the rights and responsibilities of both a prison governor and a prison chaplain in a Victorian Convict Prison. Major Hickey and Reverend Francis served respectively as Governor and Chaplain of HMP Dartmoor in the early 1870s and developed a mutual feeling of irreconcilable resentment following a clash of personalities and ideas regarding the management and punishment of male convicts in one of the most notorious of all Victorian English convict prisons. It details the causes and repercussions of the ensuing argument that led to Reverend Francis resigning his post and complaining directly to the Director of Convict Prisons about both his treatment and that of the convicts under his spiritual care. The paper relates this personal argument to the wider philosophical debates over late-Victorian penal policies that were becoming known to a larger audience thanks to both the publication of numerous prison enquiry reports and the published autobiographies of a number of erudite and well-educated middle-class convicts which proliferated during the period in question.