• Qualitative middle-range research in operations management

      Soltani, Ebrahim; K. Ahmed, Pervaiz; Ying Liao, Ying; Anosike, Paschal (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2013-06-17)
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to highlight the potential of a qualitative middle-range research approach to contribute to the advancement of operations management (OM) field. Design/methodology/approach –To better signify such contribution, it takes insight from Merton’s (1968) notion of middle-range theory as a means to create pathways of propositions that link substantive concepts and practices of OM in both context-specific and context-free operational environments. Findings – The paper brings to the fore the argument that achieving the primary objective of filling the “theory-methods” void in OM can be achieved through adoption of a qualitative middle-range approach. Originality/value – The originality of this paper hinges on the premise that theory-oriented qualitative field research that is able to incorporate experiences of different stakeholders of the OM intervention is highly likely to benefit OM theory advancement as well as OM practice. Keywords Qualitative research, Literature review, Methodology for operations management, Middle-range theory Paper type General review
    • Quality in bank service encounters: Assessing the equivalence of customers’ and front-line employees’ perceptions

      Alexiadou, Chrysi; Stylos, Nikolaos; Andronikidis, Andreas; Bellou, Victoria; Vassiliadis, Chris A. (Emerald, 2017-11-01)
      Purpose: The paper discusses the need to evaluate perception-based quality in service encounters. It sets out to diagnose potential mismatches in how customers and front-line employees perceive quality in high involvement service settings, based on the premise that any initiatives towards quality enhancement in service encounters is advisable only when employees and customers evaluate quality utilizing common perceptual structures. Design/methodology/approach: The study utilizes invariance analysis. The survey involved 165 bank branches and 1522 respondents (463 front-line employees and 1059 customers) and operationalized the same set of questions for both groups of participants. Multisample Confirmatory Factor Analysis tested a series of measurement models. Findings: Results revealed equivalence for tangibles, responsiveness, and assurance but also mismatches between customers and front-line employees perceptions of reliability and empathy. Practical implications: Findings add to current knowledge of how both groups of participants evaluate quality in service encounters and are discussed with reference to managerial consequences for perception-based quality mismatches. Originality/value: So far only a few studies have simultaneously examined front-line employees’ and customers’ perceptions of service quality in service encounters. Unlike previous research designs, this study addresses the critical aspect of potential mismatches in how customers and employees perceive service quality, and presents a methodological procedure to detect them.
    • Queer Jesus, straight angels: Complicating 'sexuality' and 'religion' in the International Raelian Movement

      Gregg, Stephen (Sage, 2014-08-15)
      This article highlights the central role of sexuality and the body within the International Raëlian Movement. The world's largest UFO-inspired New Religious Movement, the Raëlian Movement rejects theism and understands higher spiritual awareness to be dependent upon individual and communal sexual identity. Through a process called Sensual Meditation, Raëlians believe that harmony and peace may be facilitated, a view which also underpins their increasing profile of social campaigns and public protests centred upon rights for diverse adult sexualities. It will be argued, however, that Raëlian views of sexuality, although internally viewed as radical and subversive, are in fact predominantly heteronormative.
    • Queue Politely! South African Business Rescue Practitioners and their fees in Liquidation. Diener N.O. v Minister of Justice and Correctional Services and Others [2017] ZASCA 180; [2018] 1 All SA 317 (SCA); 2018 (2) SA 399 (SCA)

      Jacobs, Lézelle; Burdette, David (University of Wolverhampton, 2019-06-11)
      In May 2011 South Africa’s new corporate rescue procedure, known as “business rescue”, came into operation. The mechanism is contained in Chapter 6 of the Companies Act 2008 (the SA Companies Act) and replaces the previous corporate rescue mechanism known as judicial management. While business rescue appears to have worked quite well since its inception eight years ago, there have been a number of court judgments that have been critical of the fact that many provisions of the new procedure have not been well drafted. One of these provisions, relating to the payment of unpaid remuneration of the business rescue practitioner (BRP) where a company’s business rescue procedure is converted to a liquidation, recently gave rise to litigation with the Courts focusing on the interpretation of the relevant statutory provisions. The remuneration of insolvency practitioners is a contentious issue as much in the UK as in South Africa (and is indeed a bone of contention throughout the world). In February of this year the right honourable Frank Field MP, the chair of the UK House of Commons’ Work and Pensions Committee, commented on the £44.2 million to be paid in fees to Price Waterhouse Coopers in relation to one year’s Insolvency work on Carillion as “milking the cash cow”. This note endeavours to comment on the South African Courts’ interpretation of provisions relating to the payment of remuneration to BRPs in the event that the business rescue procedure is superseded by liquidation.
    • ‘”Quoiqu’elle ne pousse ni grands gestes ni grands cris . . . “: Comparative Literature in Great Britain’

      Hambrook, Glyn (Éditions Klincksieck, Paris, 2014-10-31)
      Following a synopsis of landmarks in the development of comparative literature in the UK, this essay considers the current situation of the field. It reviews in particular debates about the “crisis” of comparative literature, its relation to translation studies, postcolonial studies, and world literature; its response to hegemonic English; and possible future orientations.
    • Race discrimination at work: the moderating role of trade unionism in English Local government

      Seifert, Roger; Wang, Wen (Wiley, 2018-06-21)
      Workplace racism remains a serious issue despite over forty years of legislation alongside a raft of HRM policies. There remains limited research on the differences in employment experiences of British Black and Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) staff and their white colleagues. There is a power imbalance at work as between individual employees and management, and this lack of equity has been traditionally counterbalanced by strong workplace trade unionism. In particular, we know little about the role of trade unionism on the perception of workplace equality among BAME employees. Using more than 2,580 valid responses from full‐time employees in highly unionised local councils, this study shows that BAME employees have a significantly lower evaluation than their white colleague of fair pay and equal work environment. The latter fully mediates the negative perception between BAME staff and fair pay; and furthermore, the perception of union commitment to equality strengthened their views of a management‐supported equal work environment.
    • Racism, ‘second generation’ refugees and the asylum system

      Hirsch, Shirin; Department of History, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-08-30)
      This paper explores ‘second generation’ refugee experiences of racism in London, drawing on 45 qualitative interviews. The article analyses specific histories of racialisation for three different refugee groups from Vietnam, Sri Lanka and Turkey and the generational shifts in reproducing race. The asylum system is foregrounded as an essential framework in which to analyse experiences of racism. This was most evident for the first generation refugee, however for their children less is known on how these forms of racism shaped experiences. Within our study, ‘everyday’ mundane forms of racism were recounted by the ‘second generation’ which were often contrasted with that of their parents in severity. This paper analyses this inter-generational relationship further in relation to racism, through the lens of the asylum system. The paper therefore contributes to a greater empirical understanding on earlier modalities of racism and how they survive into the present.
    • Rapport final: Forum sur la gouvernance forestière, Brazzaville 2018

      MBZIBAIN, AURELIAN; Nyirenda, Richard; Nkodia, Alfred; Moukouri, Serge; Nzala, Donatien; Baur, Dani (University of Wolverhampton, Centre for International Development and Training, 2019-01-24)
      Les forêts du Bassin du Congo constituent l’un des plus importants réservoirs de biodiversité dans le monde. Elles fournissent des moyens de subsistance à plus de 75 millions de personnes qui comptent sur les ressources naturelles locales. Mais à cause de la mauvaise gouvernance observée, cette richesse tend à disparaître au fil des temps, ce qui représente une menace pour la survie des populations qui y sont installées. De nombreuses initiatives ont vu le jour pour pallier cette situation parmi lesquelles la certification forestière, REDD+ et les APV-FLEGT. Les pays du bassin du Congo ont fait de la gouvernance forestière une priorité au sein de la Commission des Forêts d’Afrique Centrale (COMIFAC). Pour y parvenir, il est évident que toutes les parties prenantes à la gestion durable des forêts se sentent concernées et doivent s’impliquer. Dans cette perspective, le projet C4CV, cofinancé par l’Union européenne et le DFID a organisé le Forum régional sur la Gouvernance Forestière (FGF) en République du Congo. Ce projet est mis en œuvre au Cameroun, en République centrafricaine, en République démocratique du Congo, au Gabon et en République du Congo. Sous la direction du CIDT de l’université de Wolverhampton, les organisations partenaires dudit projet dans les cinq pays sont : le Centre pour l’Information Environnementale et le Développement Durable (CIEDD), le centre pour l’Environnement et le Développement (CED) et Forêts et développement Rural (FODER) au Cameroun ; l’Observatoire de la Gouvernance Forestière (OGF) en RDC ; Brainforest au Gabon ; le Cercle d’Appui à la Gestion Durable des Forêts (CAGDF) en République du Congo, y compris le Field Legality Advisory Group (FLAG) en tant que partenaire régional et le World Resources Institute (WRI) en tant que partenaire international. Calqué sur le modèle des réunions semestrielles de mise à jour sur l’exploitation illégale à Chatham House, le FGF vise à contribuer aux buts plus étendus du projet CV4C à travers le partage d’expériences et la sensibilisation, et en promouvant le profil des processus APV-FLEGT et REDD+. La 11ème édition du FGF a été organisée en collaboration avec le Partenariat pour les Forêts du Bassin du Congo (PFBC), en vue de la préparation de la Rencontre des Parties de haut niveau, prévue pour la semaine du 26 novembre 2018 à Bruxelles.
    • Rates of human–macaque interactions affect grooming behavior among urban‐dwelling rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

      Kaburu, Stefano S. K; Marty, Pascal R; Beisner, Brianne; Balasubramaniam, Krishna N.; Bliss‐Moreau, Eliza; Kaur, Kawaljit; Mohan, Lalit; McCowan, Brenda (Wiley, 2018-10-03)
      OBJECTIVES: The impact of anthropogenic environmental changes may impose strong pressures on the behavioral flexibility of free-ranging animals. Here, we examine whether rates of interactions with humans had both a direct and indirect influence on the duration and distribution of social grooming in commensal rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected in two locations in the city of Shimla in northern India: an urban setting and a temple area. We divided these two locations in a series of similar-sized physical blocks (N = 48) with varying rates of human-macaque interactions. We conducted focal observations on three free-ranging rhesus macaque groups, one in the urban area and two in the temple area. RESULTS: Our analysis shows that macaques engaged in shorter grooming bouts and were more vigilant while grooming in focal sessions during which they interacted with people more frequently, suggesting that humans directly affected grooming effort and vigilance behavior. Furthermore, we found that in blocks characterized by higher rates of human-macaque interactions grooming bouts were shorter, more frequently interrupted by vigilance behavior, and were less frequently reciprocated. DISCUSSION: Our work shows that the rates of human-macaque interaction had both a direct and indirect impact on grooming behavior and that macaques flexibly modified their grooming interactions in relation to the rates of human-macaque interaction to which they were exposed. Because grooming has important social and hygienic functions in nonhuman primates, our work suggests that human presence can have important implications for animal health, social relationships and, ultimately, fitness. Our results point to the need of areas away from people even for highly adaptable species where they can engage in social interactions without human disruption.
    • Re-evaluating the Anglo-Irish Agreement: Central or Incidental to the Northern Ireland Peace process?

      O'Kane, Eammon (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007-10-18)
      The 1985 Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA) was one of the major achievements of Anglo-Irish diplomacy during the course of the Troubles. Yet its importance has been misunderstood and often ignored in subsequent histories of the development of the conflict and the peace process. This article seeks to re-evaluate the AIA. It examines the purposes of the agreement, taking issue with a number of the existing explanations. It is argued that London and Dublin had conflicting analyses of what the AIA was designed to do, which led to disappointment in both states with its impact. These differences also made it difficult for academics to accurately characterize the accord. However, the AIA played a profound and imperative role in shaping the subsequent peace process, but this arose out of consequences of the Agreement that were, despite recent claims to the contrary, unanticipated, and indeed unintended, by those who drew up the document. (Palgrave Macmillan)
    • Re-Framing Fahrenheit 451: Ray Bradbury's dramatic responses to François Truffaut

      Nichols, Phil; Eller, Jonathan; Nichols, Phil (Kent State University Press, 2014)
    • Re-Framing Fahrenheit 451: Ray Bradbury’s dramatic responses to François Truffaut

      Nichols, Phil; Eller, Jonathan; Nichols, Phil (Kent State University Press, 2015-11)
    • Ready-to-wear or Made-to-measure? Consumer Choice in the British Menswear Trade, 1900–1939

      Ugolini, Laura (London: Maney Publishing, 2003)
      This article explores British men's attitudes towards the purchase of a particular commodity — the suit — in order to shed some light on the nature of male consumer demand in the four decades before the outbreak of the Second World War. The focus is on men's motives for choosing between a ready-to-wear and a made-to-measure suit. Financial considerations aside, the article suggests that interested and well-informed male consumers generally preferred to buy bespoke suits : while usually more expensive than their ready-made counterparts, these were also perceived to be better quality, better looking, and better value, and therefore most likely to enhance the wearer's sense of self-worth as a manly, discerning and successful consumer. (Ingenta)
    • Rebellion and resistance in French Indochina, 1914-1918

      Krause, Jonathan (Taylor & Francis, 2019-12-31)
      Nearly every major French colony experienced some form of organized anticolonial resistance during, and as a direct result of, the First World War. Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Senegal, Niger, Mali, Chad, Burkina Faso, Madagascar, New Caledonia, and Indochina all experienced rebellion of some notable scope. Similar patterns of unrest also developed in the British, Russian, Italian and Ottoman empires during the First World War, suggesting a global moment for anticolonialism. These rebellions took place for many different reasons, in a wide range of historical, cultural, political and economic contexts. For all their contextual diversity, however, the anticolonial rebellions that erupted from 1914 through to the 1920s could not help but be influenced by the realities presented by the First World War. The two principal realities that influenced and helped spark anticolonial rebellions in the First World War were the reduction of colonial occupation forces across Africa and Asia and the recruitment of Afro-Asians for military and industrial service in Europe, often through coercive means. The direct influence of aspects of the First World War in sparking anticolonial rebellions across large swathes of Africa and Asia demand that we discuss these rebellions as part of both the global experience and legacy of the First World War.
    • Recognising Effective Legal Protection to People Smuggled at Sea, by Reviewing the EU Legal Framework on Human Trafficking and Solidarity between Member States

      Ventrella, Matilde (Cogitatio, 2015-02-23)
      The death toll of migrants at sea is on the increase. The EU and its Member States are not addressing the situation by widening the EU legal framework on human trafficking to persons smuggled at sea. People smuggled at sea are extremely vulnerable at the hands of their smugglers and suffer serious abuse of their human rights from their journeys through the desert, on the boats and when they reach their final destination. They become victims of human trafficking and they should not be neglected anymore by the EU and its Member States. However, all EU proposals lack of concreteness as Member States do not want to support and host migrants at sea on their territories. They are reluctant to launch solidarity between each other as requested by the Lisbon Treaty and by doing this, they are indirectly responsible for the death of many migrants at sea and for the abuse of their human rights. This article proposes alternatives to explore that could change the situation if Member States show their willingness to cooperate with each other.
    • Reconciling mental health, public policing and police accountability

      McDaniel, John L M (SAGE Publications, 2018-03-26)
      The paper evaluates a range of policy documents, parliamentary debates, academic reports and statutes in an attempt to contextualise the condition of mental health policing in England and Wales. It establishes that mental health care plays an important role in public policing and argues that police organisations need to institute urgent reforms to correct a prevailing culture of complacency. An unethical cultural attitude towards mental health care has caused decision-making and the exercise of police discretion to be neither well informed nor protective in many cases, resulting in the substandard treatment of people with mental health problems. The paper argues that changes introduced by the Policing and Crime Act 2017 and the revised College of Policing mental health guidelines do not go far enough and that more extensive root-and-branch reforms are needed.
    • Reconstructing resistance and renewal in public service unionism in the twenty-first century: lessons from a century of war and peace

      Gill-McLure, Whyeda; Thörnqvist, Christer; Management Research Centre, Wolverhampton Business School, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK; School of Business, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden (Routledge, 2017-10-26)
      This special issue uses the occasion of the centenary of the Whitley Commission Reports to illuminate the contemporary crisis in public service industrial relations from a historical perspective. In all six countries studied—Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the USA—public service employment is labour intensive and quantitatively significant in the overall economy. Public services have also been major targets of neoliberal reforms, starting in the UK and the USA at the turn of the 1980s and in the other countries about a decade later. In addition, the relatively high union density and the political dimension of public services and public union strategies have been major targets of new public management and more latterly austerity. However, the regressive period has had a differential impact in different countries. In the liberal market economies of the UK and the USA, the neoliberal turn has destabilised traditional patterns of public sector industrial relations to greatest effect. While in the more coordinated market economies, traditional arrangements and values have been more resistant to austerity and neoliberal reforms. We attempt to shed light on these differential impacts through a critical analysis of the historical evolution of public sector industrial relations in each country.
    • Recovering from conflict: What matters for livelihoods, economic activity and growth?

      Slater, Rachel; Mallett, Richard; Van Der Haar, Gemma; Hilhorst, Dorothea; Weijs, Bart (Routledge, 2016-09-01)
      The socio-economic impacts of war and large-scale violence are often devastating, multiple and wide-ranging, and it is with clear justi!cation that violent con ict has come to be identi!ed over the years as a major barrier to development. Yet, despite increased interest in con ict-a ected situations – or, to use the more common (and more contested) terminology, ‘fragile states’ – our understanding of the realities of, and the processes occurring within, such places remains limited. Researchers and policymakers continue to struggle to make sense of the heterogeneity of the impact of war – for example, among di erent population groups or over time – and basic questions regarding the e ectiveness of recovery policies remain. This is of particular concern given the recent escalation in bilateral funding to states a ected by con ict.
    • Reforming Further Education: the changing labour process for college lecturers

      Mather, Kim; Worrall, Les; Seifert, Roger (Emerald, 2007)
      Purpose – The purpose of this article is to examine how the labour process of further education lecturers has changed as a result of legislative reforms introduced in the early 1990s. Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on labour process theory and emergent perspectives on “the new public management” to provide theoretical frameworks. Evidence is derived from research carried out at three FE colleges in the English West Midlands involving interviews with managers and lecturing staff, documentary material and a survey of lecturing staff employed in the colleges. Findings – Market-based reforms in this sector have resulted in the intensification and extensification of work effort for lecturers. This paper argues that these changes have been driven by the ideological underpinning of the reform process. Individual and collective acts of lecturer resistance have been insufficiently strong to prevent change from occurring and worker alienation has increased. Research limitations/implications – The case study method renders generalisability of findings difficult. Comparative studies in other localities and sectors are needed. Practical implications – The research indicates that the “new managerialism” – which has developed in the public sector – has created an increasingly alienated workforce and that the processes of change in many institutions have had negative outcomes. Originality/value – The research demonstrates and application of labour process theory, supported by empirical evidence, as a means for examining the changing experiences of a group of public sector workers and assessing the effect of the “new managerialism” on workers' experiences.
    • Regional Cooperation in the Western Balkans: Stabilisation Device or Integration Policy?

      Dangerfield, Martin (London, Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2004)
      This article analyses regional cooperation between the Stabilisation and Association Process (SAP) states with particular emphasis on the interplay with EU integration. It argues that regional cooperation is not solely a means of stabilising the SAP 'five' (SAP5) in advance of policies to integrate them with the EU but that regional cooperation is itself a vital part of the EU integration process. This applies to both the regional integration/trade liberalisation component, which is a clear functional EU pre-accession activity, and also to the more diverse set of activities which are targeting the regional hard and soft security problems. The latter addresses the more baseline, region-wide aspects of Europeanisation, and is therefore more of a foundation course for EU accession than integration 'proper', but is nevertheless a necessary step in the SAP countries own 'return to Europe'. With Croatia on the verge of EU candidate status the political conditions for SAP zone regional cooperation should become increasingly favourable and it is important that the practical as well as political contributions of the regional cooperation commitment to the EU integration endeavour of the SAP5 are clearly understood. It is also vital that the actual regional cooperation programme avoids over-ambitious agendas and is properly adjusted to real needs and evolving circumstances of the SAP region. (Ingenta)