• Jackson Reforms - an update April 2016

      Walton, Peter (Insolvency Service, 2016-05)
    • Jackson Reforms Insolvency Litigation April 2014

      Walton, Peter (Insolvency Service, 2016-05)
    • Japan 1868-1945: From Isolation to Occupation

      Benson, John; Matsumura, Takao (London: Longman/Pearson, 2001)
      The history of Imperial Japan, from the Meiji Restoration through to defeat and occupation at the end of the Second World War, is central to any understanding of the way in which modern Japan has developed and will continue to develop in the future. This wide-ranging accessible and up-to-date interpretation of Japanese history between 1868 and 1945 provides both a narrative and analysis. Describing the major changes that took place in Japanese political, economic and social life during this period, it challenges widely-held views about the uniqueness of Japanese history and the homogeneity of Japanese society. (Longman)
    • Jean Baudrillard - against banality

      Pawlett, William (London, Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2007)
      This uniquely engaging introduction to Jean Baudrillard’s controversial writings covers his entire career focusing on Baudrillard’s central, but little understood, notion of symbolic exchange. Through the clarification of this key term a very different Baudrillard emerges: not the nihilistic postmodernist and enemy of Marxism and Feminism that his critics have constructed, but a thinker immersed in the social world and passionately committed to a radical theorizsation of it. Above all Baudrillard sought symbolic spaces, spaces where we might all, if only temporarily, shake off the system of social control. His writing sought to challenge and defy the system. By erasing our ‘liberated’ identities and suspending the pressures to compete, perform, consume and hate that the system induces, we might create spaces not of freedom, but of symbolic engagement and exchange. (Routledge)
    • Job insecurity, employee anxiety, and commitment: The moderating role of collective trust in management

      Wang, Wen; Mather, Kim; Seifert, Roger; University of Wolverhampton Business School, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK; Keele Management School, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK; University of Wolverhampton Business School, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK (2018-04-25)
      This article examines the moderating effect of collective trust in management on the relation between job insecurity (both objective and subjective) and employee outcomes (work-related anxiety and organisational commitment). This is contextualised in the modern British workplace which has seen increased employment insecurity and widespread cynicism. We use matched employer-employee data extracted from the British Workplace Employment Relations Survey (WERS) 2011, which includes over 16,000 employees from more than 1100 organisations. The multilevel analyses confirm that objective job insecurity (loss of important elements of a job such as cuts in pay, overtime, training, and working hours) are significantly correlated with high levels of work-related anxiety and lower levels of organisational commitment. These correlations are partially mediated by subjective job insecurity (perception of possible job loss). More importantly, collective trust in management (a consensus of management being reliable, honest and fair) significantly attenuates the negative impact of objective job insecurity on organisational commitment, and reduces the impact of subjective job insecurity on work-related anxiety. Theoretical and practical implications and limitations of these effects are discussed.
    • Junta by Another Name? The 1974 Matapolitefsi and the Greek Extra-Parliamentary Left

      Kassimeris, George (Sage Publications, 2005)
      In the years following metapolitefsi (the 1974 transition from dictatorship to multi-party democracy) a plethora of groups from the far left appeared on the Greek post-junta political scene. Obsessed with the dynamics of the Athens Polytechnic revolt of November 1973, these marginal but vocal and persistent groups viewed the process of constitutional change and democratic consolidation with deep scepticism. Many of them did not accept the legitimacy of the transfer of power and used confrontational anti-regime rhetoric and radical forms of action to denounce constitutional structures and attack the regime’s legality, conservative ethos and lack of structured political solutions. The purpose of this article is to describe the emergence and evolution of the major extra-parliamentary groups of the left and to examine their analyses and interpretations of Greek political circumstances in the late 1970s. (Sage Publications)
    • Just about everybody doing the business? Explaining 'cash-for-crash insurance fraud in the United Kingdom

      Button, M.; Brooks, Graham; Lewis, C.; Aleem, A. (Sage, 2016-03-21)
      There is much international research on the different types of fraud committed by individuals and/or organised crime. There is, however, limited research on insurance fraud and a particular species of such fraud which has become known as ‘cash-for-crash’ fraud in the United Kingdom. In addition there are very few published studies of fraudsters which actually draw upon interviews with those that have committed the act(s). This paper bridges both of these gaps providing a focus upon ‘cash-for-crash’ fraudsters which is based upon empirical research drawn from six interviews with such offenders and a database of over 400 offenders built upon successful prosecutions of such cases in the United Kingdom. This paper offers a profile of such offenders and presents insights into why and how some people might become involved in ‘cash-for-crash’ type frauds.
    • ‘Keep Calm and Carry on’: EU Legal Developments in 2016

      Cotter, John; University of Wolverhampton Law School (University Association for Contemporary European Studies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2017-06-06)
      For reasons not requiring much exposition, 2016 was an annus horribilis for the EU. A review of the EU judiciary’s 2016 activity reveals that the constituent courts of the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU), the Court of Justice and the General Court, do not have the luxury of existing above the tumult in splendid isolation. In a year in which old and new problems for the EU dominated the headlines, these challenges found shape in justiciable controversies. In total, the Court of Justice and the General Court delivered 844 judgments in 2016, with the Grand Chamber, the Court of Justice’s upper tier, responsible for 42 judgments, representing a reduction in the number of judgments compared to previous years.1 The growth in the CJEU’s personnel continued, with an 11th Advocate-General, Evgeni Tanchev (a Bulgarian), taking his place on the Court of Justice, and 22 General Court Judges appointed throughout the year, bringing the total number at the General Court to 44.2 2016 also saw the abolition of the Civil Service Tribunal, a specialized court that had adjudicated disputes between the EU and its civil servants: its competences have been returned to the General Court.3 This contribution seeks to analyze the year’s most significant judgments in terms of their impact on European integration, with a particular focus on the approaches adopted by the EU judiciary in response to challenges facing the EU. In accordance with convention, this contribution concentrates on the work of the Grand Chamber. In order to ensure continuity with previous years, this contribution confines itself to three subject areas. Section I provides a brief overview of the Grand Chamber’s activity in the area of eurozone crisis management, before providing a more in-depth analysis of its judgment in Ledra Advertising.4 Section II examines developments in EU data protection law, particularly the ruling in Tele2 Sverige.5 Section III discusses the Court’s development of EU citizenship rights in 2016.
    • Labour, Exploitation and Capitalism in Russia before and after 1991.

      Haynes, Michael J. (Brill Academic Publications, 2008)
      This article explores the relevance of the idea of state capitalism in Russian development. It situates the idea within the framework of capitalist development which it argues is marked by global inequalities, power imbalances and economic and military competition. The Russian Revolution of October 1917 was an attempt to overthrow this system but its failure led to a highly intense form of state capitalism which lasted until 1991. The underlying continuities in the different regimes in Russia are then analysed in terms of the process of working class exploitation.
    • Lack of business responsibility: an Islamic perspective

      Parvez, Zahid (Inderscience, 2007)
      This paper applies an Islamic perspective to understand the lack of business responsibility witnessed in recent times. A link is developed between the dominant materialistic-secular worldview and lack of business responsibility. The paper argues that a materialistic-secular worldview tends to disconnect economics from ethics, gives privilege to economic values over spiritual values, and confers primacy to legal/bureaucratic mechanisms over ethical and spiritual mechanisms for ensuring compliance to business responsibilities. It suggests that these orientations could account for the weak sense of business responsibility and unethical behaviours reported in earlier works. To remedy this, the paper proposes the broadening of problem-solving methodologies so that both material and ethical/spiritual dimensions of business responsibility are given due consideration. In addition, the paper offers four suggestions, derived from religious traditions, for nurturing the spirit and letter of business responsibility.
    • Language and psychiatry

      Galasinski, Dariusz (Elsevier, 2018-02-02)
    • Language matters: a linguist’s view on medicine

      Galasinski, Dariusz (BMJ Publishing Group, 2017-08-26)
      Language matters. I have seen this simple statement more times than I care to remember. It is used by patients, nurses, psychologists, doctors and many other healthcare professionals. In this editorial I would like to offer a view of what a statement means to a linguist. And so, first, what we say does not just mean, it means something in a particular context; second, even more importantly, language does not consist only of words, and this is why medicine and medics should focus on their ‘way of speaking’.
    • Last Act in a Violent Drama? The Trial of Greece's Revolutionary Organization 17 November

      Kassimeris, George (2006)
      By strange coincidence, Greece's Revolutionary Organization 17 November (17 N) met its end almost exactly a year after Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda terrorists felled New York's twin towers, when the group's leader of operations, Dimitris Koufodinas, turned himself in to the police after months on the run, on September 5, 2002. The capture of Koufodinas and his group marked the demise of the last and most stubborn of a generation of ideological terrorists whose campaigns caused serious political and security problems in Western Europe for more than a quarter of a century. Drawing on the judicial investigation findings and the courtroom testimonies of the terrorists, this article attempts to tell the stories of the four most senior group members in order to understand what led them to act in the way they did and, more crucially, what kept them inside a terrorist organization with no prospects and community support for so long. (Informaworld)
    • Law Patriarchies and State Formation in England and Post-Colonial Hong Kong

      Jones, Carol (Blackwell Publishing, 2001)
      The rise of the modern state is often associated with the demise of particularistic ties and authoritarian patriarchy. Classically, particularism gives way to universalism, patronage, hierarchy, and deference to the ‘equalities’ of contract. But history is not a one-way street nor is patriarchy all of one kind. Society's legal arrangements, structure, custom, power, affect, and sex swing back and forth between values of distance, deference, and patronage and those stressing greater egalitarianism in personal and political relations. Though they vary in type, patriarchy and particularism as cultural systems do not disappear but ebb, flow, and are revived, their oscillation driven by particular economic goals and political insecurities.
    • Learning from mistakes: The Barrowfield Project in Glasgow, Scotland

      Matheson, David; Matheson, Catherine (Routledge, 2014)
    • Learning strategies of Deaf and hearing impaired students in higher education

      Fleming, Joan; Hay, John (University of Wolverhampton, 2003)
      A research project on learning and teaching strategies for deaf and hearing impaired students.
    • Legal skills and the SQE: Confronting the challenge head on

      Jones, Dawn (Taylor & Francis, 2018-10-09)
      The approval of the Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE)1 in April 2018 by the Legal Services Board2 heralds the demise of the Legal Practice Course (LPC). The new route to qualification announced by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) also removes the requirement for a qualifying law degree3 prior to entering the legal profession as a solicitor, an undergraduate degree is required but the discipline is no longer prescribed. This change in approach creates new challenges for both Universities and students in relation to the acquisition of legal skills and understanding of professional conduct4 and the extent to which these elements should be incorporated into the LLB. Whether or not the LLB provided by an institution aims to include preparation for the SQE, a vocational legal education, or whether the institution offers a liberal law degree without SQE preparation will determine the degree to which practical legal skills and professional conduct will be a requisite. A liberal law degree can be seen as ‘one which does not focus on education for a particular purpose other than education itself. It is not aimed at preparing students for a particular job or profession and is not concerned with notions such as employability.’5 For those institutions offering SQE preparation the challenge may be retaining sufficient opportunities for students to engage with socio-legal writing while also covering the essential practical elements required by the SQE. This is a challenge identified by Rigg as “the dual function of providing a liberal legal education while facilitating student and external expectations of employability”.
    • Legal tender, l'égale tendre: Poet-prostitute transactions in European symbolist poetry

      Hambrook, Glyn (British Comparative Literature Association, 2003)
    • ‘Lest we forget’: a veteran and son share a ‘warfare tourism’ experience

      Fallon, P., Dr. and Robinson, P.D., Dr. (Taylor & Francis, 2016-07-01)
      ‘Warfare tourism’ represents an increasingly significant dimension of contemporary tourism. This paper provides a fresh perspective on participation in ‘warfare tourism’ by investigating the behaviour and experiences of a living veteran and his son returning to two theatres of war in which the veteran had served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War. Active interviews with the two family members were used to gather rich data regarding the two extended trips, which had been funded by ‘Heroes Return’, to Australia in 2012 and Sri Lanka in 2013. The findings indicate that some of the facets of visiting the fallen at other dark tourism sites, such as empathetic identification and personal connection, are also very relevant to trips shared between the living. However, with the living these contribute to a powerful co-created experience in which ‘closer’ bonds between the travellers can be developed. Furthermore, whilst the experiences at times represented ‘bitter-sweet’ nostalgia for the veteran, they also provided the son with the opportunity to ‘look through his father’s eyes’ from both a past and current perspective. Given that there will be war veterans as long as conflicts exist, the results have valuable messages for all those dealing with veterans in the future.