• Data Sharing in Crime Reduction: Why and How?

      Moss, Kate; Pease, Ken (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004)
      Criteria for the permissible exchange of relevant data within crime and disorder partnerships are to be found in the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. Partnerships have experienced difficulties in reaching agreement about data-sharing. This paper proposes an approach which minimises formal data-sharing while maximising relevance to crime reduction. It should be read as a radical alternative to the approach advocated by Brookes et al (2003) and is based on the excellent work undertaken in the Government Office, East Midlands.
    • Data-sharing and Crime Reduction: The Long and Winding Road

      Brookes, Stephen; Moss, Kate; Pease, Ken (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003)
      The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 charges responsible authorities with devising and implementing strategies for community safety. Responsible authorities comprise police and local authorities, working as partnerships. Criteria for the permissible exchange of relevant data are to be found in the Act. In practice, partnerships have experienced difficulties in reaching agreement about datasharing. This paper looks at the legal background to data-sharing, its limitations, best practice, and the potential consequences of lowering barriers to information exchange.
    • Deaf and hard of hearing women Menopause survey - Birmingham and Solihull results

      Bown, Sarah (University of Wolverhampton/BID Services, 2019-01-11)
      In November 2018 two workshops were conducted by Sarah Bown from the University of Wolverhampton in partnership with BID Services, focussing on the menopause as experienced by Deaf and hard of hearing women. The feedback from participants indicated a greater need for accessible information and support.
    • Decisive Battles of the English Civil War

      Wanklyn, Malcolm (Barnsley: Pen and Sword Books, 2006)
      An investigation of the decisive battles of the English Civil War, this work reassesses what actually happened on the battlefield and sheds fresh light on the causes of the eventual defeat of Charles I. It takes each major battle in turn - Edgehill, Newbury I, Cheriton, Marston Moor, Newbury II, Naseby, and Preston.
    • Democratic Transitions and Forms of Corruption

      Moran, Jonathan (Springer Verlag, 2001)
      Any transition to democracy has implications for corruption. This papertakes a contextual and procesual approach to the analysis of democratisation and corruption. It disaggregates some variables whereby democratisation can provide the context for the development of corruption and crime. This paper does not argue democratisation causes corruption and crime. Nor does it argue democratisation does not provide the social space for the reduction of corruption and crime. This paper concentrates on the areas in which democratisation provides an often complex environment for the development of corruption and crime.
    • Denied a Future? The right to education of Roma/Gypsy and traveller children in Europe

      Pinnock, Katherine (London: Save the Children, 2001)
      The idea for the Denied a Future? report emerged at the 1999 session of the UN Commission on Human Rights. Save the Children decided that there was a need for a basic text that described legislation, policy and practice with regard to education provision for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children in a number of European countries. Denied a Future? therefore describes law, policy and practice in the period June 2000 to June 2001. The report was intended to serve as a benchmark against which the impact of contemporaray and future investments by the World Bank, the European Union, national and local governments and other agencies could be assessed. The report, published online in 4 volumes, highlights the lack of access to good-quality education of Roma children across Europe. Across Europe the challenge of providing Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children with access to quality education is not being met. Many school systems continue to marginalise Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children, thereby effectively denying them the chance to reach their full potential. Denied a future? examines 14 countries across Europe. It highlights the impact that a lack of personal security and freedom of movement, poverty and powerlessness all have on access to education for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children.
    • Destination images, holistic images and personal normative beliefs: Predictors of intention to revisit a destination

      Stylos, Nikolaos; Vassiliadis, Chris A.; Bellou, Victoria; Andronikidis, Andreas (Elsevier, 2015-09-25)
      This research examines the complex relationship between components of images of destinations and behavioral intentions, incorporating two pivotal constructs that have not been explored in the related literature, namely holistic image and personal normative beliefs (PNBs). Previous studies incorporating destination images as predictors of intention to revisit have mostly investigated their direct effect. This research integrates holistic image as a mediator and PNBs as a moderating variable. The findings verify the mediating role of holistic image for predicting tourists’ intentions to revisit a destination, supporting a model that incorporates a partial effect and two indirect mediations. Interestingly, only affective and conative images contribute to the prediction of tourists’ intentions to revisit a destination through the holistic image towards this destination. Moreover, PNBs moderate the effect that conative destination images have on tourists’ holistic images. Practically, the research sheds light to factors that affect tourists' tendency to select a tourism destination, which can serve as a basis for tailoring the effective positioning of destinations.
    • Destination marketing: The use of technology since the millennium

      Li, Sammy C.H.; Robinson, Peter; Oriade, Ade (Elsevier, 2017-06-01)
      This editorial presents an overview of studies contained in this special issue. Recognising that destination management and marketing remains a key field of academic study and as an issue of importance to the tourism industry. The collection of papers in this issue explore the rapid and expansive technological enhancement and innovations in destination management. Whilst not attempting to provide full coverage of emerging technologies, the issue has succeeded in identifying some key issues for future practice and research.
    • Determinants of environmental sustainable behaviour amongst logging companies in Cameroon

      MBZIBAIN, AURELIAN (Academic Star Publishing Company, 2019-12-31)
      This paper presents the findings of an indepth qualitative study of the most important forest logging companies and syndicates to explore the factors which influence forest exploitation and related businesses in the Congo Basin of Africa to act or not in environmentally sustainable ways. More specifically, the study explored the motivations, the benefits and the factors which facilitate or constrain sustainable behaviour amongst forest exploitation companies in Cameroon. Data analysis was undertaken using a holistic model consisting of institutional, economic and resource based factors. Economic motivations were the most cited factors driven by increased awareness and demands from clients. Interestingly, the most cited benefit from adopting environmentally sustainable behaviour related to gains in internal organisation, transparency and productivity within the company. The regulatory institutional environment was the most cited constraint because of illegality, weak law enforcement and corruption in the country’s forest sector followed by high costs of investment and unclear financial premiums from environmentally sourced timber. The policy implications are discussed.
    • Determinants of greenfield emerging market outward FDI into the UK

      Cook, Mark; Godwin, Eun Sun (Emerald, 2018-07-16)
      Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of Greenfield Emerging Market (EM) Outward Foreign Direct Investment (OFDI) into the UK, a Developed Market (DM) host. Despite the increasing significance of EM OFDI, this particular theme of EM OFDI to a DM host has received relatively little attention from researchers. This paper seeks to address this shortfall. Design/methodology/approach: Considering the distinctiveness of EM OFDI in its firmspecific characteristics, given circumstances and motivations, this paper applies adapted ‘Resource-based view (RBV)’ framework and institutional theory to build a theoretical framework. A range of hypotheses regarding ‘strategic-asset seeking’, ‘market-seeking’ and ‘institution-seeking’ motivations of EM OFDI, which reflect both ‘pull factors’ (advantages in hosts) and ‘push factors’ (disadvantages at home), were then developed. Using panel data for the years 2003-2012, the research questions were analysed using a sample of the then most important emerging market source countries which had undertaken Greenfield FDI into the UK. Findings: The analysis results supported the hypotheses that strategic-asset seeking and institution-seeking motivations were important in determining EM OFDI to the UK, with the coefficients of relevant variables showing statistical significance and expected sign (i.e. positive). However, the hypothesis on market-seeking motivation of EM OFDI cannot be supported as the coefficient of the relevant variable, whilst showing the expected sign, had a statistically insignificant coefficient. Amongst the three control variables, the source countries’ exports and imports as a percentage of GDP was statistically significant and had the correct sign whilst, the UK’s share of intra-EU trade, whilst statistically significant, had the opposite sign to that expected. The third control variable, the exchange rate was not statistically significant, though it had the correct sign. Originality/value: This paper provides an adjusted theoretical framework for the analysis of EM OFDI to DM with a novel application of institutional theory and RBV. It also qualifies and extends existing works on EM OFDI by including a wider range of EM source countries and DM hosts with empirical analysis results as well as theoretical suggestions. In addition, the paper offers up a range of policy implications for DM hosts.
    • The determinants of trust in the boardroom

      Ogunseyin, Michael; Farquhar, Stuart; Machold, Silke; Gabrielsson, Jonas; Khlif, Wafa; Yamak, Sibel (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019-07-26)
      Using a behavioural perspective, this chapter presents further knowledge on the conditions in the boardroom that facilitate or hinder the presence of trust. Building on previous studies, a model explaining the hypothesised relationships between trust and its determinants (cognitive conflict, communication efficacy, the perception of board members’ competence, affective conflict, and familiarity), with the moderating effects of board meeting frequency and board tenure, was developed. Based on a survey of UK companies, it was found that the perception of board members’ competence and familiarity are positively related to trust, whereas affective conflict is negatively related to trust. The implication of this finding for board practice is that boards of directors should engage in activities such as training and development that increase directors’ perception of each other’s competencies and why affective conflict should be managed in the boardroom.
    • Developing a model of disability that focuses on the actions of disabled people

      Levitt, Jonathan M.; Research Institute of Information and Language Processing, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2017-05-25)
      Disabled people, writers on disability and disability activists stress the importance of disabled people being included in all aspects of society. I argue that a major omission from this inclusiveness, is that no current model of disability focuses on the impact of the actions of disabled people on disability. Disabled people are not passive bystanders, powerless to reduce the restrictions of disability. On the contrary, we are central to actively limiting its constraints. I develop a model of disability, called ‘active’, which focuses on the effects on disability of the individual and collective actions of disabled people. I describe published findings which indicate that engaging in self-help, using support groups and deploying assistive technology can all reduce the limitations of disability. Recent increases in the number of disability support groups and developments in assistive technology have substantially augmented the potential for disabled people to combat the effects of disability.
    • Developing alternative teaching skills through a programme of video analysis and mentoring

      Hockings, Christine (University of Wolverhampton, 2002)
      In 2000, the University of Wolverhampton's Learning and Teaching Strategy funded an innovation project to change a traditionally taught module to a module based on social constructivist principles. The project team found that whilst the changes to the module improved student learning, they had overlooked the demands these alternative methods would make on the teaching skills and expertise of colleagues. The changes not only required lecturers to think differently about how they teach, they also required them to act differently in the classroom e.g. from ‘telling’ to ‘questioning’ behaviour. Getting students to actively engage with each other and negotiate meaning, rather than imparting knowledge, seemed particularly problematic. At times it was all too tempting to revert back to telling students what they ‘should’ know rather than facilitating the generation of students’ own ideas and encouraging a spirit of enquiry. Of course there could be many factors that affect classroom practice, including the teacher’s beliefs about the students and the subject she is teaching. I therefore conjectured that in order to develop appropriate instructional behaviour we would first need to understand and work on the factors affecting classroom behaviour.
    • Developing capacity, confidence and voice: experiences from a five-year capacity building for improving forest governance model

      MBZIBAIN, AURELIAN; Begum, Rufsana; Haruna, Ella; Nyirenda, Richard; Pavey, Marc (World Forestry Congress 2015, 2015-09-07)
      The objective of this paper is to share lessons learnt from the Centre for International Development and Training’s (CIDT) five-year capacity building (CB) model for improving forest governance (FG). The model develops individual, organisational, and institutional capacities and creates “venues of accountability” that facilitate cross-country learning. The model operates at three levels: international, regional and national. The first component is a UK-based programme of training and mentoring that targets mid-level FG champions from government, private sector and civil society in 20+ countries/3 continents. This is complemented by a series of high-level regional Forest Governance Forums (FGFs) facilitated in selected countries (Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana and Liberia) and tailored national CB events co-delivered with local partners. Data is drawn from online surveys of international alumni, regional FGF participants and 80 face-to-face interviews with various stakeholders from 15 countries. Results show significant improvements in knowledge, skills, attitudes and confidence of course participants, with evidence of effective application of learning and multiplier effects on the ground. Additionally, the value of north-south and south-south exchanges is evidenced by the creation of networks and alliances of FG champions. The findings also demonstrate the innovativeness of FGFs as spaces of accountability and cross-country learning, notably because they ensure momentum on FG reforms is maintained at national, regional and international levels. The implications of this work to policy and practice are discussed.
    • Developing effective leadership behaviours: the value of evidence-based management.

      Hamlin, Robert G.; Sawyer, Jenny (Association of MBAs, 2007)
      This article presents the findings of an HRD Professional Partnership study of effective and ineffective managerial and leadership behaviours exhibited by executive leaders within the UK business of a large international telecommunications company, and describes how the research has challenged various aspects of the organisation’s company-wide competency framework and its executive leader development programme. Additionally, the article reveals and discusses the extent to which the results are generalised to the findings of several managerial and leadership effectiveness studies carried out in other UK private and public-sector organisations, and the contribution of this research to current debates concerning the universality of management and leadership, and the concept of evidence-based management.
    • Developing effective managers and leaders within healthcare and social care contexts: an evidence-based approach.

      Cooper, D. J.; Hamlin, Robert G. (Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), 2007)
      This book: Across Europe and the world, countries are attempting to develop their health and social policies and practices to address the global challenge of increasing demand and pressurized supply, created by ageing populations, emerging technologies and finite resources (financial and human). This text provides examples of attempts to develop HRD practices in health and social care contexts within France, Ireland, The Netherlands, Romania, Russia, the UK and the USA. Thus, the book is European and international in both scope and appeal.
    • Developing entrepreneurship in Africa: investigating critical resource challenges

      Atiase, Victor; Mahmood, Samia; Wang, Yong; Botchie, David (Emerald, 2018-08-13)
      Purpose – By drawing upon institutional theory, this study investigates the role of four critical resources (credit, electricity, contract enforcement and political governance) in explaining the quality of entrepreneurship and the depth of the supporting entrepreneurship ecosystem in Africa. Design/methodology/approach – A quantitative approach based on ordinary least squares regression analysis was used. Three data sources were employed. Firstly, the Global Entrepreneurship and Development Index (GEDI) of 35 African countries was used to measure the quality of entrepreneurship and depth of the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Africa which represents the dependent variable. Secondly, the World Bank’s data on access to credit, electricity and contract enforcement in Africa was also employed as explanatory variables. Thirdly, the Ibrahim Index of African Governance was used as an explanatory variable. Finally, country-specific data on four control variables (GDP, FDI, population and education) were gathered and analysed. Findings – To support entrepreneurship development, Africa needs broad financial inclusion and state institutions that are more effective at enforcing contracts. Access to credit was nonsignificant and therefore did not contribute to the dependent variable (entrepreneurship quality and depth of entrepreneurial support in Africa). Access to electricity and political governance were statistically significant and correlated positively with the dependent variables. Finally, contract enforcement was partially significant and contributed to the dependent variable. Research limitations/implications – A lack of GEI data for all 54 African countries limited this study to only 35 African countries: 31 in sub-Saharan Africa and 4 in North Africa. Therefore, the generalisability of this study’s findings to the whole of Africa might be limited. Secondly, this study depended on indexes for this study. Therefore, any inconsistencies in the index aggregation if any could not be authenticated. This study has practical implications for the development of entrepreneurship in Africa. Public and private institutions for credit delivery, contract enforcement and the provision of utility services such as electricity are crucial for entrepreneurship development. Originality/value The institutional void is a challenge for Africa. This study highlights the weak, corrupt nature of African institutions that supposedly support MSME growth. Effective entrepreneurship development in Africa depends on the presence of a supportive institutional infrastructure. This study engages institutional theory to explain the role of institutional factors such as state institutions, financial institutions, utility providers and markets in entrepreneurship development in Africa.
    • Developing journal writing skills in undergraduates: the need for journal workshops

      Hockings, Christine (University of Wolverhampton, 1998)
      In recent years, journal writing has become a popular tool for assessing student learning in Business Studies courses throughout UK universities. The writing-to-learn literature is full of the benefits of journal writing, not just as a means of assessing learning but as an essential part of the learning process itself. (Barclay, 1996; Borasi & Rose, 1989; Emig, 1987; Hogan, 1995; Holly 1987; Yinger & Clarke 1981, etc.). In the personal experience (as tutor) explored in this paper, however, journal writing failed to live up to expectations, both as a means of assessing the acquisition and application of subject specific knowledge, but also and more importantly, as a means of developing high level cognitive skills, such as reflection, analysis, critical thinking, evaluating, and hypothesising. In this paper I explain why journal writing failed to develop high level skills amongst a group of first year undergraduates in 1996. I then evaluate the effectiveness of a journal writing workshop designed to address high level skills amongst two similar groups of students in 1997.
    • Developing Responsive Preventative Practices: Key Messages from Children's and Families' Experiences of the Children's Fund

      Pinnock, Katherine; Evans, Ruth (Wiley InterScience, 2008)
      As part of the prevention and social inclusion agenda, the Children's Fund, set up in 2000, has developed preventative services for children at risk of social exclusion. Drawing on a large qualitative dataset of interviews conducted in 2004/05 with children, young people and their parents/carers who accessed Children Fund services, this article analyses key practices and approaches valued by children and parents. These included: specialist support tailored to individual support needs, family-oriented approaches, trusting relationships with service providers, multi-agency approaches and sustainability of services. Finally, the article draws out key lessons for the future development of preventative services. (Blackwell)
    • Did Wigan have a northern soul?

      Gildart, Keith; Catterall, Stephen; Lashua, Brett; Wagg, Stephen; Spracklen, Karl; Yavuz, M. Selim (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
      The town of Wigan in Lancashire, England, will forever be associated with the Northern Soul scene because of the existence of the Casino Club, which operated in the town between 1973 and 1981. By contrast, Liverpool just 22 miles west, with the ‘the most intensely aware soul music Black Community in the country’, (Cohen, 2007, p.31 quoting from Melody Maker, 24 July 1976) remained immune to the attractions of Northern Soul and its associated scene, music, subculture and mythology. Similarly, the city of Manchester has been more broadly associated with punk and post-punk. Wigan was and remains indelibly connected to the Northern Soul scene with the Casino representing a symbolic location for reading the geographical, class and occupational basis of the scene’s practitioners. The club is etched into the history, iconography, and mythology of Northern Soul appearing in the academic and more general literature, television documentaries, memoirs, autobiographies and feature films. This chapter seeks to explore the relationship between history, place, class, industrialisation, mythology and nostalgia in terms of Wigan, the Casino Club and the Northern Soul scene. It asks the question: did Wigan have a northern soul? This is explored through the industrial and working-class history of the town and the place of soul music in its post-war popular culture. More broadly, it complements the historical literature on regional identity identifying how Northern Soul both complemented and challenged orthodox readings of Wigan as a town built on coal and cotton that by the 1970s was entering a process of deindustrialisation.