• Access to health and social care services for deaf and hard of hearing people in Wolverhampton

      Bown, Sarah; Dekesel, Kristiaan (Healthwatch Wolverhampton in conjunction with University of Wolverhampton, 2017-12-01)
      In 2012 Johannes Fellinger and colleagues highlighted a growing concern for signs of health inequality amongst D/deaf individuals, in the area of both general and mental health, within their respective community/country. The claim was even made that deafness itself can endanger your health (Alexander, Ladd and Powell, 2012). It was also established that the level of poor communication between D/deaf patients and health professionals, exacerbated the barriers to health care, which D/deaf people experienced. Barnet et.al. examining health inequality experienced by D/deaf people argued that “... It appears that addressing language barriers improves adherence with some preventive services and may help prevent chronic diseases or improve patient’s long-term outcomes through earlier detection” (Barnett, et al, 2011:2). This is supported by Alexander, Ladd and Powell, who advocate that “good communication is the key” (2012:980), given that it is “the bedrock of diagnosis and treatment” (The Lancet, 2012:977) and has the potential to avoid offering a lower standard of service (Sign Health 2014).
    • Company voluntary arrangements: evaluating success and failure

      Walton, P.; Jacobs, L.; Umfreville, C. (R3 & ICAEW, 2018)
    • Deaf and hard of hearing women Menopause survey - Birmingham and Solihull results

      Bown, Sarah (University of Wolverhampton/BID Services, 2019-01-11)
      In November 2018 two workshops were conducted by Sarah Bown from the University of Wolverhampton in partnership with BID Services, focussing on the menopause as experienced by Deaf and hard of hearing women. The feedback from participants indicated a greater need for accessible information and support.
    • Denied a Future? The right to education of Roma/Gypsy and traveller children in Europe

      Pinnock, Katherine (London: Save the Children, 2001)
      The idea for the Denied a Future? report emerged at the 1999 session of the UN Commission on Human Rights. Save the Children decided that there was a need for a basic text that described legislation, policy and practice with regard to education provision for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children in a number of European countries. Denied a Future? therefore describes law, policy and practice in the period June 2000 to June 2001. The report was intended to serve as a benchmark against which the impact of contemporaray and future investments by the World Bank, the European Union, national and local governments and other agencies could be assessed. The report, published online in 4 volumes, highlights the lack of access to good-quality education of Roma children across Europe. Across Europe the challenge of providing Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children with access to quality education is not being met. Many school systems continue to marginalise Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children, thereby effectively denying them the chance to reach their full potential. Denied a future? examines 14 countries across Europe. It highlights the impact that a lack of personal security and freedom of movement, poverty and powerlessness all have on access to education for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children.
    • Evaluation of Specialist Domestic Violence Courts/Fast Track Systems

      Cook, Dee; Burton, Mandy; Robinson, Amanda; Vallely, Christine (Commissioned by the Crown Prosecution Service and the Department for Constitutional Affairs, 2004)
      Overall, our research indicates the notable and positive benefits of Specialist Domestic Violence Courts and Fast Track Systems in three key ways: • Both ‘clustering’ and ‘fast-tracking’ DV cases enhances the effectiveness of court and support services for victims. • Both SDVC and FTS arrangements make advocacy and information-sharing easier to accomplish. • Victim participation and satisfaction is improved and thus public confidence in the CJS is increased. All the courts have created the infrastructure necessary for continued improvements in the effectiveness and efficiency in dealing with domestic violence cases Such courts enable the development of best practice in multi-agency, integrated ways of working that place the victim at the heart of the process.
    • Exploring the impact of the Improving forest governance (IFG) course: a study on 4 years (2010-2013) of IFG course delivery

      MBZIBAIN, AURELIAN; Pavey, Marc; Nyirenda, Richard; Haruna, Ella; Thomas, Sarah; Mahony, Desmond; Dearden, Philip; Begum, Rufsana (University of Wolverhampton, Centre for International Development and training, 2015-07-01)
      This study explores the impact of the Improving Forest Governance course, a UK-based training programme aimed at frontline players in timber producing and processing countries. The course aims to build capacity of participants to engage in and lead on activities promoting better forest governance. This report looks at the extent to which course alumni have been able to improve forest governance, and illustrates the specific outcomes which demonstrate that.
    • Jackson Reforms - an update April 2016

      Walton, Peter (Insolvency Service, 2016-05)
    • Jackson Reforms Insolvency Litigation April 2014

      Walton, Peter (Insolvency Service, 2016-05)
    • Kidney Health Inequalities in the United Kingdom: Reflecting on the past, reducing in the future

      Caskey, Fergus; Dreyer, Gavin; Evans, Katharine; Methven, Shona; Scott, Jemima; Brettle, Alison; Castledine, Clare; Chapman, Fiona; Fraser, Simon; Hounkpatin, Hilda; et al. (Kidney Research UK, 2018-09-01)
    • Marine Archaeology Legislation Project

      Williams, Michael V. (English Heritage, 2004)
      INTRODUCTION: This Part reviews in depth the genesis and the nature of the present legal framework relating to maritime archaeology in England and Wales. It also considers what advantages and difficulties have resulted from the United Kingdom's continued adherence to this structure. Annexed to this Part is a Report of a survey conducted by NAS Training of the experiences of stakeholders regarding the functioning of the designation and licensing processes under the Protection of Wrecks Act 1973. Two principal characteristics determine the legal structure for maritime archaeology in England. The first is the continued reliance on the law of salvage to govern the recovery of wreck from the sea, irrespective of its antiquity. Consequently, the corner stone of this structure is the law of salvage, with its associated legislation, principally the Merchant Shipping Act 1995, which incorporates the International Convention on Salvage 1989 into United Kingdom law. However, it has been recognised that the application of the law of salvage to archaeological material is not considered appropriate by many in the archaeological community, as this approach is contrary to the internationally recognised precautionary principle, which seeks as the first option to preserve the heritage in situ1. Consequently, a few statutory amendments to the salvage regime have been introduced to take account of the particular cultural nature of archaeological material, the desirability of preserving it in situ if possible and the importance, if recovery is necessary, of regulating that process so to preserve archaeologically significant information. However, these amendments are fairly limited in nature, being confined to limitations on the freedom to access wreck sites and initiate salvage operations. Otherwise, the rights and duties of the participants in the maritime archaeological process and the disposal of the recovered wreck material continue to be determined by the law of salvage. The second principal characteristic of the legal structure is the absence of a satisfactory mechanism for protecting archaeology which is not derived from shipwreck, since the salvage regime is not applicable to the protection and recovery of evidence relating to submerged landscapes, dwellings or other former human habitation or activity. Only one statute, the Ancient Monuments & Archaeological Areas Act 1979 enables such archaeological material to be protected and its application underwater has been very limited, never having been applied underwater to remains other than wrecks. This conservative approach to the legal regime for maritime archaeology has generated controversy and numerous documents have drawn attention to the alleged inadequacies of the present framework. To many in the archaeological community, this framework is unduly limited in scope, fails to provide adequate protection to maritime archaeology and, by continued adherence to the salvage regime, has facilitated the use of inappropriate practices relating to the excavation and disposal of artefacts. This, it is claimed, is in stark contrast to the more regulatory stance taken by some other countries, where the diving and excavation of historic wrecks is far more heavily regulated and the protection of historic shipwreck has been taken entirely outside the ambit of the salvage regime.
    • Plymouth Past, Sustainable Future

      Cox, David (Plymouth University Law School, 2016-11)
      On Saturday 14 November 2015 Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery hosted an event which formed part of the Economic & Social Research Council’s (ESRC) annual Festival of Social Science. The interdisciplinary public engagement event (organised by Professor Kim Stevenson) was entitled Plymouth Past: Sustainable Future and involved interactive displays and exhibitions of the work of several members of the Plymouth University School of Law on this year’s ESRC theme of sustainability The exhibition focused on 3 main aspects: social, cultural and environmental sustainability.
    • Pre-Pack Empirical Research: Characteristic and Outcome Analysis of Pre-Pack Administration

      Walton, Peter; Umfreville, Christopher; Wilson, Paul (University of Wolverhampton, 2016-05)
    • Rapport final: Forum sur la gouvernance forestière, Brazzaville 2018

      MBZIBAIN, AURELIAN; Nyirenda, Richard; Nkodia, Alfred; Moukouri, Serge; Nzala, Donatien; Baur, Dani (University of Wolverhampton, Centre for International Development and Training, 2019-01-24)
      Les forêts du Bassin du Congo constituent l’un des plus importants réservoirs de biodiversité dans le monde. Elles fournissent des moyens de subsistance à plus de 75 millions de personnes qui comptent sur les ressources naturelles locales. Mais à cause de la mauvaise gouvernance observée, cette richesse tend à disparaître au fil des temps, ce qui représente une menace pour la survie des populations qui y sont installées. De nombreuses initiatives ont vu le jour pour pallier cette situation parmi lesquelles la certification forestière, REDD+ et les APV-FLEGT. Les pays du bassin du Congo ont fait de la gouvernance forestière une priorité au sein de la Commission des Forêts d’Afrique Centrale (COMIFAC). Pour y parvenir, il est évident que toutes les parties prenantes à la gestion durable des forêts se sentent concernées et doivent s’impliquer. Dans cette perspective, le projet C4CV, cofinancé par l’Union européenne et le DFID a organisé le Forum régional sur la Gouvernance Forestière (FGF) en République du Congo. Ce projet est mis en œuvre au Cameroun, en République centrafricaine, en République démocratique du Congo, au Gabon et en République du Congo. Sous la direction du CIDT de l’université de Wolverhampton, les organisations partenaires dudit projet dans les cinq pays sont : le Centre pour l’Information Environnementale et le Développement Durable (CIEDD), le centre pour l’Environnement et le Développement (CED) et Forêts et développement Rural (FODER) au Cameroun ; l’Observatoire de la Gouvernance Forestière (OGF) en RDC ; Brainforest au Gabon ; le Cercle d’Appui à la Gestion Durable des Forêts (CAGDF) en République du Congo, y compris le Field Legality Advisory Group (FLAG) en tant que partenaire régional et le World Resources Institute (WRI) en tant que partenaire international. Calqué sur le modèle des réunions semestrielles de mise à jour sur l’exploitation illégale à Chatham House, le FGF vise à contribuer aux buts plus étendus du projet CV4C à travers le partage d’expériences et la sensibilisation, et en promouvant le profil des processus APV-FLEGT et REDD+. La 11ème édition du FGF a été organisée en collaboration avec le Partenariat pour les Forêts du Bassin du Congo (PFBC), en vue de la préparation de la Rencontre des Parties de haut niveau, prévue pour la semaine du 26 novembre 2018 à Bruxelles.
    • Strengthening links between social protection and disaster risk management for adaptive social protection in Nepal

      Slater, Rachel; Ghimire, Anita; Baur, Dani (World Bank, 2018-11-01)
      A key challenge in Nepal is the intersection of predictable chronic or seasonal poverty andvulnerability, with rapid-onset and acute shocks. Nepal in the last few decades has epitomized the'perfect storm' in which a number of different factors—disasters, conflict, political uncertainty, and challenges to economic growth—coincide with deleterious effects on people's well-being anddevelopment progress. While social protection (SP) is playing an increasing role in tackling chronic and seasonal poverty and wider vulnerability and exclusion, recent disasters in Nepal, particularly in 2015, highlight how making SP more flexible and adaptive could allow a more effective and efficient development and humanitarian response. The World Bank in Nepal contracted the Centre for International Development and Training at the University of Wolverhampton, United Kingdom, and the Nepal Institute for Social and Environmental Research, to carry out the technical assistance (TA) project 'Review of policies, systems and programs in social protection and shock response for adaptive social protection in Nepal'. The overall objective of the work is to make recommendations on possible policy, programmatic, and institutional measures for more adaptive social protection (ASP). The analysis was delivered using a mixed-methods approach. An analysis of existing data (including the Household Risk and Vulnerability Survey [HRVS] data) was used to understand the scope and coverage of existing programs and their links to disasters and shocks. A desk review of literature explored legislation and policies, program documentation and official implementation guidelines, and evaluations and research. Interviews took place with key informants at the national, district, and local government levels as did focus group discussions (FGDs) and individual interviews, especially with recipients of SP programs, at the ward or village level in the districts of Bardiya, Humla, Saptari, and Sindhupalchok.
    • Summary report of the Cameroon Regional Forest Governance Forum: creating space for stakeholder participation in forest governance

      Begum, Rufsana; Mei, Giorgia; Nyirenda, Richard; Kouetcha, Christelle; Mbzibain, Aurelian (Centre for International Development and Training, University of Wolverhampton, 2016-09-02)
      The Cameroon Regional Forest Governance Forum held 16th-18th March 2016 at Hotel La Falaise, Yaoundé was the first to be held under the auspices of the Congo Basin VPA Implementation - Championing Forest Peoples’ Rights and Participation Project (EU-CFPR) project. It is the tenth under a series of similar international conferences implemented under the Centre for International Development and Training (CIDT)’s previous project ‘Strengthening African Forest Governance’ (SAFG). The EU-CFPR project is supported by the European Union and DFID and is implemented in the Central African Republic (CAR) and Cameroon. The project is led by the Centre for International Development and Training (CIDT), University of Wolverhampton, working in partnership with Centre pour l’Information Environnementale et le Développement Durable (CIEDD), Maison de l’Enfant et de la Femme Pygmées (MEFP) in CAR, Centre pour l’Environnement et le Développement (CED) and Forêts et Développement Rural (FODER) in Cameroon, FERN and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) in Europe. The Cameroon Regional Forest Governance Forum was also delivered with the generous support of a number of organisations and initiatives. These included the EU FAO FLEGT Programme, the DFID funded FLEGT-VPA support programme, the Forest Stewardship Council, the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR Regional Office, Cameroon) and the Cameroon Ministry of Forests and Wildlife. The Cameroon Regional FGF was the first in which the FSC was officially involved. The aim of the Cameroon Regional FGF was to contribute to the wider aims of the EU-CFPR project through experience sharing and raising awareness, and the profile of FLEGT-VPA process. The specific objective of the Cameroon Regional FGF was to provide a free, deliberative and open space for the exchange of information, experiences, lessons, ideas and up to date research around Forest Governance, FLEGT-VPAs and other initiatives seeking to improve forest governance and combat illegal logging. This objective was met in full as will be highlighted in this report.