• Company voluntary arrangements: evaluating success and failure

      Walton, P.; Jacobs, L.; Umfreville, C. (R3 & ICAEW, 2018)
    • Denied a Future? The right to education of Roma/Gypsy and traveller children in Europe

      Pinnock, Katherine (London: Save the Children, 2001)
      The idea for the Denied a Future? report emerged at the 1999 session of the UN Commission on Human Rights. Save the Children decided that there was a need for a basic text that described legislation, policy and practice with regard to education provision for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children in a number of European countries. Denied a Future? therefore describes law, policy and practice in the period June 2000 to June 2001. The report was intended to serve as a benchmark against which the impact of contemporaray and future investments by the World Bank, the European Union, national and local governments and other agencies could be assessed. The report, published online in 4 volumes, highlights the lack of access to good-quality education of Roma children across Europe. Across Europe the challenge of providing Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children with access to quality education is not being met. Many school systems continue to marginalise Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children, thereby effectively denying them the chance to reach their full potential. Denied a future? examines 14 countries across Europe. It highlights the impact that a lack of personal security and freedom of movement, poverty and powerlessness all have on access to education for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children.
    • Developing Preventative Practices: The Experiences of Children, Young People and their families in the Children's Fund

      Evans, Ruth; Pinnock, Katherine; Bierens, Hanne; Edwards, Anne (London: Department for Education and Skills, 2006)
      The Children's Fund was set up in 2000, in part as a catalyst to move forward interagency co-operation and child and family-led preventative services in local authorities. The initiative will run until 2008 and have total funding of £960m over the life of the programme. It is, therefore, part of a long-term strategy aimed at strengthening communities and families as places where children and young people can develop as healthy, responsible and engaged citizens. The initiative targets children and young people aged five to 13 years who are considered to be at risk of social exclusion in 149 partnership arrangements across all 150 local authorities in England. The National Evaluation of the Children's Fund (NECF) was commissioned in late 2002 and ran until March 2006. The NECF was co-ordinated by the University of Birmingham & Institute of Education. The evaluation examined the structures, processes and outcomes of the Children's Fund. The evaluation has generated a series of reports. 'Developing Preventative Practices: The Experiences of Children, Young People and their families in the Children's Fund' aims to address the overarching question of which Children's Fund practices and approaches promote good outcomes for children and young people and support their pathways to inclusion. The report uses the concepts of risk, resilience and protection to understand the responses of children and families to the services provided by the Children's Fund and the immediate impact these services have made on their lives, The report also begins to locate these experiences within some broader notions of social exclusion and inclusion in order to reflect on how learning from the Children's Fund might be taken forward.
    • Evaluation of Specialist Domestic Violence Courts/Fast Track Systems

      Cook, Dee; Burton, Mandy; Robinson, Amanda; Vallely, Christine (Commissioned by the Crown Prosecution Service and the Department for Constitutional Affairs, 2004)
      Overall, our research indicates the notable and positive benefits of Specialist Domestic Violence Courts and Fast Track Systems in three key ways: • Both ‘clustering’ and ‘fast-tracking’ DV cases enhances the effectiveness of court and support services for victims. • Both SDVC and FTS arrangements make advocacy and information-sharing easier to accomplish. • Victim participation and satisfaction is improved and thus public confidence in the CJS is increased. All the courts have created the infrastructure necessary for continued improvements in the effectiveness and efficiency in dealing with domestic violence cases Such courts enable the development of best practice in multi-agency, integrated ways of working that place the victim at the heart of the process.
    • Jackson Reforms - an update April 2016

      Walton, Peter (Insolvency Service, 2016-05)
    • Jackson Reforms Insolvency Litigation April 2014

      Walton, Peter (Insolvency Service, 2016-05)
    • Marine Archaeology Legislation Project

      Williams, Michael V. (English Heritage, 2004)
      INTRODUCTION: This Part reviews in depth the genesis and the nature of the present legal framework relating to maritime archaeology in England and Wales. It also considers what advantages and difficulties have resulted from the United Kingdom's continued adherence to this structure. Annexed to this Part is a Report of a survey conducted by NAS Training of the experiences of stakeholders regarding the functioning of the designation and licensing processes under the Protection of Wrecks Act 1973. Two principal characteristics determine the legal structure for maritime archaeology in England. The first is the continued reliance on the law of salvage to govern the recovery of wreck from the sea, irrespective of its antiquity. Consequently, the corner stone of this structure is the law of salvage, with its associated legislation, principally the Merchant Shipping Act 1995, which incorporates the International Convention on Salvage 1989 into United Kingdom law. However, it has been recognised that the application of the law of salvage to archaeological material is not considered appropriate by many in the archaeological community, as this approach is contrary to the internationally recognised precautionary principle, which seeks as the first option to preserve the heritage in situ1. Consequently, a few statutory amendments to the salvage regime have been introduced to take account of the particular cultural nature of archaeological material, the desirability of preserving it in situ if possible and the importance, if recovery is necessary, of regulating that process so to preserve archaeologically significant information. However, these amendments are fairly limited in nature, being confined to limitations on the freedom to access wreck sites and initiate salvage operations. Otherwise, the rights and duties of the participants in the maritime archaeological process and the disposal of the recovered wreck material continue to be determined by the law of salvage. The second principal characteristic of the legal structure is the absence of a satisfactory mechanism for protecting archaeology which is not derived from shipwreck, since the salvage regime is not applicable to the protection and recovery of evidence relating to submerged landscapes, dwellings or other former human habitation or activity. Only one statute, the Ancient Monuments & Archaeological Areas Act 1979 enables such archaeological material to be protected and its application underwater has been very limited, never having been applied underwater to remains other than wrecks. This conservative approach to the legal regime for maritime archaeology has generated controversy and numerous documents have drawn attention to the alleged inadequacies of the present framework. To many in the archaeological community, this framework is unduly limited in scope, fails to provide adequate protection to maritime archaeology and, by continued adherence to the salvage regime, has facilitated the use of inappropriate practices relating to the excavation and disposal of artefacts. This, it is claimed, is in stark contrast to the more regulatory stance taken by some other countries, where the diving and excavation of historic wrecks is far more heavily regulated and the protection of historic shipwreck has been taken entirely outside the ambit of the salvage regime.
    • Plymouth Past, Sustainable Future

      Cox, David (Plymouth University Law School, 2016-11)
      On Saturday 14 November 2015 Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery hosted an event which formed part of the Economic & Social Research Council’s (ESRC) annual Festival of Social Science. The interdisciplinary public engagement event (organised by Professor Kim Stevenson) was entitled Plymouth Past: Sustainable Future and involved interactive displays and exhibitions of the work of several members of the Plymouth University School of Law on this year’s ESRC theme of sustainability The exhibition focused on 3 main aspects: social, cultural and environmental sustainability.
    • Pre-Pack Empirical Research: Characteristic and Outcome Analysis of Pre-Pack Administration

      Walton, Peter; Umfreville, Christopher; Wilson, Paul (University of Wolverhampton, 2016-05)
    • Strengthening links between social protection and disaster risk management for adaptive social protection in Nepal

      Slater, Rachel; Ghimire, Anita; Baur, Dani (World Bank, 2018-11-01)
      A key challenge in Nepal is the intersection of predictable chronic or seasonal poverty andvulnerability, with rapid-onset and acute shocks. Nepal in the last few decades has epitomized the'perfect storm' in which a number of different factors—disasters, conflict, political uncertainty, and challenges to economic growth—coincide with deleterious effects on people's well-being anddevelopment progress. While social protection (SP) is playing an increasing role in tackling chronic and seasonal poverty and wider vulnerability and exclusion, recent disasters in Nepal, particularly in 2015, highlight how making SP more flexible and adaptive could allow a more effective and efficient development and humanitarian response. The World Bank in Nepal contracted the Centre for International Development and Training at the University of Wolverhampton, United Kingdom, and the Nepal Institute for Social and Environmental Research, to carry out the technical assistance (TA) project 'Review of policies, systems and programs in social protection and shock response for adaptive social protection in Nepal'. The overall objective of the work is to make recommendations on possible policy, programmatic, and institutional measures for more adaptive social protection (ASP). The analysis was delivered using a mixed-methods approach. An analysis of existing data (including the Household Risk and Vulnerability Survey [HRVS] data) was used to understand the scope and coverage of existing programs and their links to disasters and shocks. A desk review of literature explored legislation and policies, program documentation and official implementation guidelines, and evaluations and research. Interviews took place with key informants at the national, district, and local government levels as did focus group discussions (FGDs) and individual interviews, especially with recipients of SP programs, at the ward or village level in the districts of Bardiya, Humla, Saptari, and Sindhupalchok.