• Behavioural determinants of perceived managerial and leadership effectiveness in Argentina

      Hamlin, Robert G.; Ruiz, Carols E; Carioni, Angeles (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2016-04-21)
      The purpose of this empirical study was to explore the perceptions of Argentinean employees about managerial and leadership effectiveness, and was guided by the following research question: How do people employed in Argentinean companies behaviorally differentiate effective managers from ineffective managers? A total of 42 employees from private and public sector organizations in Cordoba, Argentina, were interviewed using Flanagan’s (1954) critical incident technique. The interviews generated 302 critical incidents of which 155 were examples of positive (effective) managerial behavior, and 147 of negative (least effective/ineffective) managerial behavior. The findings suggest that Argentineans perceive as effective those managers who are supportive, considerate, motivating, caring, good decision makers, approachable, participative, fair-minded, communicative, actively involved, and who act as role models; and this challenges the widely held belief that Argentineans prefer authoritarian managers over democratic ones.
    • Britain, NATO and the Lessons of the Balkan Conflicts 1991-1999 (Sandhurst Conference)

      Badsey, Stephen; Latowski, Paul (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2004)
      This publication considers the lessons to be gained for Britain, the British armed forces, and for NATO as a whole, from the Yugoslav wars of dissolution (1991-1999), with particular emphasis on the Kosovo crisis. The papers come from a diverse and high quality mixture of analysts, practitioners and policy-makers. The issues developed here represent a significant advance in the emerging debate on the lessons to be learnt from the Balkan experience, which will shape thinking on defence and international security far into the new millennium.
    • Coaching at the heart of managerial effectiveness: A cross-cultural study of managerial behaviours

      Hamlin, Robert G.; Ellinger, Andrea D.; Beattie, Rona S. (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2006)
      The concept of managers and managerial leaders assuming the developmental role of coaching has gained considerable attention in recent years as organizations seek to leverage learning by creating infrastructures that foster employee learning and development. However, despite the increasing focus on managerial coaching and the many contentions that coaching is an essential feature of really effective management, the literature remains predominantly practice-based and atheoretical. The present study attempts to address this lack of a sound and sufficient empirical base by presenting the results of a cross-cultural comparison of the empirical findings from several previous 'managerial coaching effectiveness' and 'managerial and leadership effectiveness' studies completed by the authors in their three respective countries. Its specific aim is to demonstrate empirically the extent to which being an effective coach is an essential feature of being an effective manager and/or managerial leader.
    • Construction of suicidal ideation in medical records

      Galasinski, Dariusz; Ziółkowska, Justyna (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2017-07-13)
      In this paper we are interested in exploring discursive transformation of patients’ stories
of suicidal ideation into medical discourses. In other words, we focus on how the narrated experience of suicidal thoughts made during the psychiatric assessment interview is recorded in the patients’ medical record. Our data come from recordings of psychiatric interviews, as well as the doctors’ notes in the medical records made after the interviews, collected in psychiatric hospitals in Poland. Assuming a constructionist view of discourse, we demonstrate that lived experience of suicide ideation resulting in stories of a complex and homogeneous group of “thoughts” is reduced to brief statements of fact of presence/existence. Exploration of the relationship between the interviews and the notes suggest a stark imposition of the medical gaze upon them. We end with arguments that discursive practices relegating lived experience from the focus of clinical practice deprives it of information which is meaningful and clinically significant.
    • Crime Reduction

      Moss, Kate (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2008)
      Across the globe, challenging and contentious issues about community safety and security increasingly exercise governments and police forces—as well as, for example, town planners and car-park designers. Consequently, as a specialist area within the wider discipline of criminology, crime reduction has never before enjoyed such prominence in public and scholarly discourse. With research on and around the subject flourishing as never before, this new title in the Routledge Major Works series, Critical Concepts in Criminology, meets the need for an authoritative reference work to make sense of the subdiscipline’s colossal literature and the continuing explosion in research output and practice. Edited by Kate Moss, a prominent academic in the field, Crime Reduction is a four-volume collection of foundational and cutting-edge scholarship. The first volume in the collection (‘Approaches to Reduction’) brings together the best research on the different approaches to crime reduction, including its classification and theory, and ideas of what is preventable. The work gathered here also includes criticisms of crime reduction, not least research around the phenomena of displacement and sustainability. Volume II (‘Motivation of the Criminal Inclination’) collects the most important work on issues of crime reduction, particularly those concerned with what one thinker has described as ‘structure and psyche’. The scholarship in this volume draws both on the structural perspective (which emphasizes the view that reduction is achievable only through economic and social change, especially by ameliorating inequality or levels of social exclusion), and the ‘psyche’ approach (which regards crime principally as a product of the human spirit and seeks to change criminal inclination and activity by policies of, for example, deterrence, incapacitation, and reform). The notion of situational crime reduction has been a particularly active area of research in recent years. But the idea that changes to the social and physical settings in which crime may occur can reduce its frequency or impact is far from uncontroversial. Volume III (‘Situational Crime Reduction’) assembles the best thinking in this area tackling, for example, ethical dilemmas about the impact of some reduction strategies on our freedom and privacy rights, as well as the difficult and profound implications that arise from the increasing extent to which crime reduction has become the de facto responsibility of private rather than state organizations. The final volume in the collection (‘Crime Prevention in Action’) gathers together the best cutting-edge work to highlight key examples of empirical crime reduction research in action. It includes research focusing on: the need to incentivize crime reduction to persuade more people to take responsibility for reducing a greater variety of crime; the effects of apparently subtle strategies (such as changes to street lighting); and anticipatory changes (whereby crime seems to reduce in advance of reduction initiatives). Volume IV also includes assessments of the future developments in the field. Crime Reduction is fully indexed and includes a comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which places the collected material in its historical and intellectual context. An essential reference collection, it is destined to be valued by scholars, students, and practitioners as a vital one-stop research and pedagogic resource.
    • Criminal Justice in Hong Kong

      Jones, Carol; Vagg, John (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2007)
      Containing a wealth of archival material and statistical data on crime and criminal justice, Criminal Justice in Hong Kong presents a detailed evaluation of Hong Kong’s criminal justice system, both past and present. Exploring the justice system and the perceptions of popular culture, this book demonstrates how the current criminal justice system has been influenced and shaped over time by Hong Kong’s historical position between ‘East’ and ‘West’. Jones and Vagg’s examination of the justice system not only takes into account geographical changes, like the erection of the border with communist China in 1950 but also insists that any deep understanding of the current system requires a dialogue with the rich and complex narratives of Hong Kong’s history. It explores a range of questions, including: * How were Hong Kong's criminal justice institutions and practices formed? * What has been its experience of law and order? * How has Hong Kong's status as between 'East' and 'West' affected its social, political and legal institutions? Careful and detailed, this analysis of one of the most economically successful, politically stable and safe yet frequently misrepresented cities, is a valuable addition to the bookshelves of all undergraduate and postgraduate students studying Asian law. (Routledge)
    • Disability and the family in South Wales coalfield society, c.1920–1939

      Curtis, Ben; Thompson, Steven (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2017-06-14)
      This article utilises the south Wales coalfield in the interwar period as a case study to illustrate the applicability of two sociological theories – family systems theory and the social ecology of the family – to impairment in the past. It demonstrates that a theoretically-informed approach can help to situate impairment in its particular contexts, most especially the family and the community, and give a better sense of the lived experience of disability. It also demonstrates the complexity of the experience of disability as the family and economic circumstances of each impaired individual varied and led to different forms of care-giving or the utilisation of different sources of support. The article also sheds further light on the ubiquity of disability as many families included a number of individuals with different impairments and this too had consequences for experiences and coping strategies.
    • In support of evidence-based management and research-informed HRD through HRD professional partnerships: an empirical and comparative study

      Hamlin, Robert G. (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2002)
      This article describes a programme of practice-grounded empirical management research set within an NHS Trust Hospital in the UK that was conducted as part of an HRD Professional Partnership of the kind advocated by Jacobs (1997). The research was concerned with identifying the criteria of managerial effectiveness at the middle and front-line levels of management using critical incident technique and factor analytic methods. The results are compared against those from an equivalent partnership research study carried out previously by the author within one part of the British Civil Service, namely the Anglia Collection of HM Customs & Excise. The findings lend support to the notion of the 'universally effective manager', and provide empirical support for the potential development of evidence-based and research-informed approaches to management and human resource development within the case-study NHS Trust Hospital, and possibly beyond.
    • Media interaction in the Kosovo Conflict

      Badsey, Stephen (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2004)
      This publication considers the lessons to be gained for Britain, the British armed forces, and for NATO as a whole, from the Yugoslav wars of dissolution (1991-1999), with particular emphasis on the Kosovo crisis. The papers come from a diverse and high quality mixture of analysts, practitioners and policy-makers. The issues developed here represent a significant advance in the emerging debate on the lessons to be learnt from the Balkan experience, which will shape thinking on defence and international security far into the new millennium.
    • Programme and Project Cycle Management (PPCM): lessons from South and North

      Dearden, Philip; Kowalski, Robert (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2003)
      This paper documents the lessons drawn from several years of practical work with a range of Programme and Project Cycle Management (PPCM) processes and tools. The need for PPCM training, and not simply Logical Framework training, is emphasised, as is the importance of using an experiential training methodology. Institutional ownership of both PPCM tools and approaches are considered to be vital for success. Since so many donors now use PPCM tools, the need for development professionals to have PPCM skills and knowledge is paramount. The value of logframes as a tool to both increase programme/project ownership and communication is highlighted. The importance of thinking outside the boxes of the logframe at the project/programme review stage is also emphasised.
    • Residual brand awareness following the termination of a long-term event sponsorship and the appointment of a new sponsor

      Mason, Roger B.; Cochetel, Fabrice (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2006)
      This study examined brand awareness after a change in sponsor and audience perceptions about the sponsors and the event before and after the change. A survey of the audience at a surfing event was conducted. The findings were that the original sponsor maintained high awareness levels with the audience, particularly awareness of the previously sponsored event, thereby supporting the proposition that long‐term sponsorship supports long‐term brand awareness. Secondly, the research found that a change in sponsorship does not necessarily lead to changes in respondents' perceptions of the event. Thirdly, the research showed that there was a mismatch in the values of the original sponsor and the event, whereas the current sponsor had a closer match with the event's values. Sponsorships change fairly frequently and it would be of interest to sponsors to know the extent to which benefits continue to accrue after they have stopped sponsoring an event. Since almost no research has been carried out on residual awareness and awareness decay, this paper should contribute to knowledge about the cessation of sponsorships, as well as to the broader field of sponsorship knowledge.
    • ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow’: The Post-Soviet Transition, the Market and the Mythical Process of Convergence

      Haynes, Michael J.; Husan, Rumy (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2002)
      At the core of thinking about the post-communist transition has been the goal of convergence with the advanced West. This article accepts the legitimacy of this goal but argues that the prospects for its achievement are not good. Neo-classical theorists have misled and continue to mislead policy makers about the ease with which the goal can be achieved and the necessary conditions. The global pattern of growth and development suggests that 'convergence' is not a general characteristic of the world economy. A realistic appraisal of the potential in the transition bloc has therefore to address both regional problems and the overall pattern of global inequality.
    • The Falklands Conflict as a Media War

      Badsey, Stephen (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2004)
      A fascinating new insight into the Falklands Conflict, covering every aspect of its origins and the political and diplomatic response to the Argentinean action as well as illuminating accounts of the military action to retake the islands, at every level of command. In June 2002, exactly twenty years after the cessation of hostilities between Britain and Argentina, many of the key participants came together at a major international conference. This conference, held at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and organized jointly by RMA Sandhurst and her sister institution Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, aimed to re-examine the events of spring 1982 from the perspective that only twenty intervening years can bring. The Conference mixed those who had participated in the events of spring and early summer 1982, diplomats, politicians, civil servants, soldiers, sailors and airmen, with historians, political scientists and journalists. These accounts and interpretations of the conflict shed new light on one of the most interesting and controversial episodes in recent British history.
    • The Falklands Conflict Twenty Years on: Lessons for the Future

      Badsey, Stephen; Havers, Bob; Grove, Mark (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2004)
      A fascinating new insight into the Falklands Conflict, covering every aspect of its origins and the political and diplomatic response to the Argentinean action as well as illuminating accounts of the military action to retake the islands, at every level of command. In June 2002, exactly twenty years after the cessation of hostilities between Britain and Argentina, many of the key participants came together at a major international conference. This conference, held at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and organized jointly by RMA Sandhurst and her sister institution Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, aimed to re-examine the events of spring 1982 from the perspective that only twenty intervening years can bring. The Conference mixed those who had participated in the events of spring and early summer 1982, diplomats, politicians, civil servants, soldiers, sailors and airmen, with historians, political scientists and journalists. These accounts and interpretations of the conflict shed new light on one of the most interesting and controversial episodes in recent British history.
    • The impact of a changing financial climate on a UK local charitable sector: voices from the front line

      Hannibal, Claire; Glennon, Russell; Meehan, Joanne (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2017-02-13)
      Forced to compete with private and public sector providers, charities experience tensions as the quest for a more commercially-oriented position may conflict with their social imperative. Research has examined the broader impact of recent policy changes on the charitable sector, yet less attention has been given to understanding the experiences of local charities as service providers. This article captures the experiences of those working on the front line of charities and analyses their responses to the current funding environment.
    • The Quality and Ethics Connection: Toward Virtuous Organizations.

      Ahmed, Pervaiz K.; Machold, Silke (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2004)
      Quality as a philosophy of management practice has become widely embedded in organizational mindsets. This paper looks at the fundamental theories of ethics and morality, and shows how these and a fuller consideration of these can lead to better practice of social responsibility through a higher platform of quality, which we call quality consciousness. The paper shows that business actions, and indeed the pedagogy of management theory, are not in themselves amoral. Rather, they are driven by a systematic reflection of the context. The paper develops the implication of this for the extension and strengthening of the concept of quality by delineating the definitional boundary of quality, and then scrutinizing the philosophy of quality and the philosophy of virtue and morality to examine conceptual inter-linkage and symbiosis. The paper promulgates a view of quality that explicitly incorporates virtue as part of the quality paradigm. The paper then charts how the rigorous incorporation of ethics and organizational morality can be made in quality management, and how this will lead to the next stage of evolution in quality theory and the role this new heightened sense will play in better managerial practice of corporate social responsibility. By critique, the paper develops a tentative framework to move toward the virtuous organization. This, the paper suggests, is the next stage of quality evolution.
    • Toward Universalistic Models of Managerial Leader Effectiveness: A Comparative Study of Recent British and American Derived Models of Leadership

      Hamlin, Robert G. (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2005)
      House and Aditya (1997) claim there is a compelling logic suggesting the 'universality' of managerial leader effectiveness but this represents theoretical speculation and remains to be developed theoretically and demonstrated empirically. Their view contrasts sharply with the 'contingent' views of many writers who perceive problems arising from the significant differences in organizational settings and cultures that affect the management and leadership environment, and who question the generalizability and transferability of US management and leadership research to non-US cultures. The present study sets out to contribute to this debate. The findings from a qualitative comparative analytic study of empirically derived criteria of managerial leader effectiveness resulting from several factor analytic studies carried out in Britain and America respectively are presented and discussed. The research has revealed a high degree of universality that lends strong support to those who believe in generic theories and 'universalistic' models of management and leadership.
    • Towards building an integrated perspective on e-democracy

      Parvez, Zahid; Ahmed, Pervaiz K. (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2006)
      This paper evaluates the dominant perspectives for understanding e-democracy in practice. It argues that although these, on their own, only provide static and partial accounts of the role and implications of e-democracy, nevertheless they should not be disregarded. The paper proposes an integration of their key positions to generate a more rounded and complete account of the role of e-democracy in practice. It suggests that Giddens's Structuration Theory provides a starting point in this direction. A structuration perspective is able to integrate many of the diverse perspectives whilst simultaneously avoiding technological and social determinism by focusing attention on the interplay of social structures and agency in e-democracy practices. This perspective assists in illuminating the underlying institutional arrangements and structures in which e-democracy practices are embedded, as well as the strategies employed by human actors. It focuses attention on structures of signification, domination and legitimation that surround e-democracy practices and also how individuals are both enabled and constrained in these practices. It is argued that more complete and balanced accounts which emerge from such an integrated perspective could assist in developing a more effective e-democracy policy.
    • Working Weeks, Rave Weekends: Identity Fragmentation and the Emergence of New Communities

      Goulding, Christina; Shankar, Avi; Elliott, Richard (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2002)
      Popular music is one of the most ubiquitous forms of contemporary culture. This paper looks at the phenomenon known as rave or dance culture in Britain. It examines the nature of the consumer experience at a dance club through the use of a two stage methodology. Based on observations and the collection of phenomenological data, the findings suggest that the experience is linked to a series of behaviours, which are related to fragmentation and identity. These include narcissistic identity, the emergence of new communities, the need for escape, engagement and prolonged hedonism. The paper examines these concepts in relation to postmodern consumption. In particular, an evaluation of postmodern theory and its focus on fragmentation and the project of the self is offered, by arguing for a return to "community".