• “Who is Mr. Karlheinz Stockhausen? Introduce Me”: Responses to Krautrock/Kosmische in 1970s Britain

      Glen, Patrick (Taylor & Francis, 2021-12-31)
      During the 1970s, British music fans came to know several West German avant-garde rock or ‘Krautrock’ bands through the music press, radio, television, tours and record releases. This occurred as Britain’s relationship with Europe and West Germany shifted through membership of the Common Market from 1973 and as Cold War allies. This article explores how musical encounters and the broader historical and socio-political context affected British representations of Germany and Germans. It argues that in spite of a changing historical context and space for meaningful, nuanced representations, the myths and memory of the Second World War and general clichés about Germans remained highly resilient. Representations of Germans and Germany in popular music culture, authored by the post-War generation, suggest the importance of Germany as a counterpoint to understandings British national identity and characteristics, and the ways in which ideas of British cultural superiority circulated in popular culture.
    • Black Britain in the weekly music press during the late-1960s and 1970s

      Glen, Patrick (Taylor & Francis, 2021-12-31)
      Music is a means of communicating and sharing. Sounds and lyrics, even the most abstract or oblique, can document memories, impressions of the present and articulate desires for the future that listeners unpack and reinterpret imposing their own contexts, experiences and prior understandings. Recorded music provided a memory technology that allowed these ideas, sounds and cultures to be articulated, transmitted and interpreted more quickly and further than oral cultures previously allowed. A culture industry and mass media (newspapers, magazines, books television and radio) gave certain—profoundly shaped by capitalism, creating and perpetuating structures of power in society—recorded songs and musics the chance to be shared across and between countries and continents. Within the colonial and post-colonial context Britain after 1945, music made and performed by people who had arrived in Britain from colonies, created in dialogue with those who remained, and the reaction to it by their ‘hosts’, provided an impression of both new arrivals and British society. As Jon Stratton argues regarding Caribbean migration to Britain, ‘[music] offered sites for memory and identity, a refuge from the present and a source of opposition and to and commentary on the migrants’ circumstances. In the new situation cultural exchange with the dominant culture was inevitable.’
    • Determinants of environmental sustainable behaviour amongst logging companies in Cameroon

      MBZIBAIN, AURELIAN (Academic Star Publishing Company, 2021-12-31)
      This paper presents the findings of an indepth qualitative study of the most important forest logging companies and syndicates to explore the factors which influence forest exploitation and related businesses in the Congo Basin of Africa to act or not in environmentally sustainable ways. More specifically, the study explored the motivations, the benefits and the factors which facilitate or constrain sustainable behaviour amongst forest exploitation companies in Cameroon. Data analysis was undertaken using a holistic model consisting of institutional, economic and resource based factors. Economic motivations were the most cited factors driven by increased awareness and demands from clients. Interestingly, the most cited benefit from adopting environmentally sustainable behaviour related to gains in internal organisation, transparency and productivity within the company. The regulatory institutional environment was the most cited constraint because of illegality, weak law enforcement and corruption in the country’s forest sector followed by high costs of investment and unclear financial premiums from environmentally sourced timber. The policy implications are discussed.
    • Fit to be president: William Howard Taft, sports and athleticism

      Burns, Adam (Intellect Publishers, 2021-12-31)
      The early twentieth century was a time when the US public consciousness recognized an increasing association between their political leaders and sports and athleticism. With an exceptional precedent for this connection set by Theodore Roosevelt (1901–1909), his replacement as US president would inevitably find it hard to keep pace. In the modern-day popular consciousness, Roosevelt’s immediate successor, William Howard Taft (1909–1913), is often noted more for his obesity than for his physical athleticism or sporting prowess. Yet, as this article shows, as Taft moved closer to the White House, the contemporary US press increasingly associated him with sports, and at least the pursuit of physical fitness. In a post-Rooseveltian America, a rise to national political prominence demanded a portrayal of a president’s links to sports and athleticism, even in the unlikeliest of candidates.
    • Job stress and employee outcomes: employment practices in a charity

      Wang, Wen; Seifert, Roger (Emerald Publishing, 2021-12-31)
      Design/methodology/approach We collected both quantitative (through a staff survey and administrative records of sick leave in the previous 12 months) and qualitative data (through interviews and focus groups) from one branch of an internationally well-established and UK-based religious charity between 2017 and 2018. Purpose The study intends to examine employee relations with a changing workforce resulting from the business-like transformation in the charity sector. We investigated sector-specific employment practices which can alleviate job stress (as a given and which has been made worse by the transformation). Developed from the intrinsic and extrinsic motivation framework, the findings can inform human resource management practices in its new efficiency-seeking business model. Findings The quantitative results support a strong mediating effect of job satisfaction between job stress and staff sick leave. The negative correlation shown between job stress and job satisfaction is subject to paid staff perception of meaningful work and their level of involvement in decisionmaking, with the latter having a stronger moderating effect. The qualitative data provides further contextualized evidence on the findings. Practical implications It is important for charities to uphold and reflect their charitable mission towards beneficiaries and paid staff during the shift to an efficiency-seeking business model. Charities should involve their new professional workforce in strategic decision-making to better shape a context-based operational model. Originality/value The study examined employee relations in the nonprofit charity sector with a changing workforce during the transition to a more business-oriented model. In particular, we revealed sector-specific factors that can moderate the association between job stress and absenteeism, and thereby contribute to the understanding of HRM practices in the sector.
    • A qualitative study on the experiences and challenges of MBA students’ engagement with a business research methods module

      Nzekwe-Excel, Chinny (Emerald, 2021-12-31)
      Undertaking research as part of a business degree qualification undoubtedly enables students to develop practical and life-long skills. Nevertheless, students seem to find it challenging undertaking a research project. This study set out to explore the experiences of a group of MBA students who recently undertook their business and management research projects as part of their MBA degree program. The study was carried out in a UK Higher Education Institution and is based on an MBA Business and Management Research Module. The purpose of the module is to enable learners to develop advancedlevel independent research and critical problem-solving skills within a business context. The study adopted a qualitative approach to capture a broad mix of students’ experiences and perceptions on the Module. The sample includes previous MBA students on different cohorts, and different nationalities. Outcomes of the study show that though students are stretched in the business and management project process, they develop a diversity of skills required in the workplace while conducting their projects. The study findings also show that the practical implications of the students’ projects and progressive support from their Project Supervisors contribute to the successful completion of their projects and subsequent attainment of their MBA degree. Outcomes of this study further reveal that undertaking business and management projects creates a rewarding learning experience for learners/students, develops confident graduates, as well as enables effective applications of theory into practice.
    • Mediation and arbitration: An alternative forum for transnational dispute resolution in the music industries

      Potocnik, Metka; Harrison, Ann; Rigg, Tony (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2021-08-26)
    • Mediation and arbitration of music disputes: an alternative forum for transnational disputes

      Potocnik, Metka; Harrison, Ann; Tony, Rigg (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2021-07-29)
    • From the playing fields of Rugby and Eton: the transnational origins of American rugby and the making of American football

      Burns, Adam (Human Kinetics Publishers Inc., 2021-03-18)
      Some studies date the origins of US intercollegiate football – and, by extension, the modern game of American football – back to a soccer-style game played between Princeton and Rutgers universities in 1869. This article joins with others to argue that such a narrative is misleading, and goes further to clarify the significance of two “international” fixtures in 1873 and 1874, which had a formative and lasting impact on football in the United States. These games, contested between alumni from England’s Eton College and students at Yale University, and between students at Canada’s McGill University and Harvard University, combined to revolutionize the American football code. Between 1875 and 1880, previous soccer-style versions of US intercollegiate football were replaced with an imported, if somewhat modified, version of rugby football. It was the “American rugby” that arose as a result of these transnational exchanges that is the true ancestor of the gridiron game of today.
    • Toward an e-commerce strategy: Impact of family dynamics

      Tomaselli, Salvo; Wang, Yong; Caspertz, Donella; Pei, Rong (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021-03-05)
    • Can cruise services satisfy Chinese outbound travelers? An importance–performance analysis

      Kong, Haiyan; Okumus, Fevzi; Rahimi, Roya; Bu, Naipeng; Yin, Zihan (Routledge, 2021-02-26)
      This study aims to explore tourists’ satisfaction with cruise services and the gap between expectation and satisfaction, focusing on Chinese outbound tourists traveling to South Korea. Using a mixed-methods approach, in-depth interviews were conducted to summarize items of cruise services for measurement; importance–performance analysis was performed to simultaneously examine the matching degree between tourists’ perceived importance and performance. Tourists’ expectation is measured by the side of importance, meanwhile, performance represents their satisfaction. This study suggests that cruising is an important way for Chinese tourists to travel abroad, and tourists were generally satisfied with the services provided by immigration, customs, and the cruises. However, a gap remains between the perceived expectation and satisfaction. In terms of cruise service, the most important item was the good language and communication skills of the staff, and the most satisfactory performance was the effective boarding service. The biggest gap was observed in the effective service of handling ticket bookings, cancellations, and confirmations. The results of this study can provide insight into enhancing cruise services and marketing, specifically for companies working with the Chinese market.
    • Does intergenerational leadership hinder the realization of innovation potential? A resource orchestration perspective

      Wang, Yong; Beltagui, Ahmad (Taylor and Francis, 2021-02-12)
      This study examines the impact of intergenerational leadership on innovative capability and business performance. Applying a resource orchestration perspective to data from 531 family businesses in China, the results suggest that innovative capability is positively related to growth performance of family businesses. Furthermore, family businesses in solo control by one generation demonstrate a higher positive relationship between innovative capability and performance than those jointly controlled by two generations. This suggests that intergenerational leadership hampers the realization of the potential of innovation.
    • Experiences from frontline forest communities: Covid-19 impacts on indigenous peoples and local communities, women and forest and wildlife illegality in the Congo Basin

      Mbzibain, Aurelian; Mohsen Mohamed, Habiba; Baur, Daniela; Jara Cazares, Cristina (The University of Wolverhampton, Centre for International Development and Training (CIDT), 2021-01-27)
    • Out of area housing by local authorities in England: displacement of vulnerable households in a neoliberal housing crisis

      Iafrati, Steve (Policy Press, 2021-01-19)
      Based on freedom of information responses from English local authorities, the research examines the number of households where a duty to accommodate was accepted that were subsequently housed in other local authority areas. Recognising neoliberal housing policy of increased marketisation and less government intervention, the article identifies market failure, housing unaffordability and welfare reform contributing to households being displaced and social cleansing. Importantly, the research recognises negative housing outcomes beyond the binary of homelessness and the impact on vulnerable households by examining out of area housing, which is currently an under-researched area within housing.
    • Denying the right to work. German trade regulation and anti-gypsy policy 1871-1914

      Constantine, Simon (Taylor and Francis, 2021-01-17)
      This article examines the role that a discriminatory application of the German Trade Code (Gewerbeordnung) played in the ‘Gypsy’ policy of the German Second Empire. It argues that the Code became central to the legalistic, bureaucratic form that their persecution assumed in this period, serving to criminalize the itinerant lifestyle of the Sinti and Roma and contributing greatly to their social and economic marginalization.
    • Sensory ecologies and semiotic assemblages during British Sign Language interpreted weather forecasts

      Stone, Christopher; Köhring, Jenny (Taylor & Francis, 2021-01-11)
      We present a study examining broadcast British Sign Language (BSL) interpreted weather forecasts. These are filmed against a green screen with a superimposed composite image broadcast including maps and satellite information, etc. that can be indexed. We examine the semiotic resources used when interacting with the available visible on-screen information to the viewing audiences. The forecasters and interpreters tailor their multimodal communicative practice to the sensory ecology (Kusters, 2017) of the audiences they serve. That is to say that, speakers/hearers hear the spoken monolingual linguistic resources while seeing the gestural resources of the forecaster ; BSL signers/watchers view the multilingual linguistic resources (both categorical and gradient) and co-sign gestural resources, subsequently watching the gestural resources of the forecaster and the interpreter -presenter. We identify that while similar gestural resources are used by the weather presenters and the in-vision interpreter-presenters, the temporal alignment of the semiotic assemblages (Pennycook & Otsuji, 2017) of linguistic and gestural resources are different. The assumed normative practices of the deaf audience appear to significantly contribute to the consecutive use of semiotic resources that we see presented in BSL by in-vision interpreter-presenters. In addition to simultaneous assemblages, favoured by the weather forecaster presenters, they also create consecutive semiotic assemblages.
    • Operation Allied Force as a catalyst for change: Toward Intensified multinational cooperation

      Burczynska, Maria E; Paget, Steven (University Press of Kentucky, 2021-01)
    • The postdigital university: do we still need just a little of that human touch?

      Cureton, Debra; Jones, Jenni; Hughes, Julie (Springer, 2020-12-21)
      An increasing body of literature considers the role of belonging and social connectivity in undergraduate student success. The core tenet of this research is that relationships are crucial to the development of a sense of belonging. However, within the Higher Education (HE) sector, our processes, and therefore how we interact with students, are becoming more and more automated. None more so than during the Covid-19 pandemic and the ‘new normal’ in HE. This paper considers how we, as a profession, might support each student’s developing sense of belonging within a sector that is shifting towards increased digitalisation. This is achieved through considering the political agenda that drives the creation of digital education and some of the assumptions that underpin the movement towards it. As a result, a theoretical platform is created to consider the areas where digitisation impacts on teaching staff, and on students, and how this relates to each student’s sense of belonging within HE. The inclusion of two case studies has provided the opportunity to answer two key questions: 1) What is important to students developing a personal sense of belonging in HE during their first few weeks in a University? 2) How can the differentiated human touch be provided by ‘third space’ professionals both in person and virtually?
    • The entertainment press

      Glen, Patrick; Conboy, Martin; Bingham, Adrian (University of Edinburgh, 2020-11-30)
      Coleman joined the Melody Maker at their Fleet Street office in 1960, and at first found it hard to adjust to a different style of showbiz journalism. He couldn't see what was ‘newsworthy’ about a string of Cliff Richard tour dates and preferred to stir up a row with the BBC or research a heavily angled investigation into the music business. Feeling frustrated, he planned to defect to the Daily Telegraph. Then he encountered a classic put-down from a Telegraph executive at his job interview. Asked where he worked, he replied: ‘The Melody Maker.’ And before that? ‘The Manchester Evening News.’ After a long pause, the executive inquired icily: ‘Tell me, Mr Coleman, why did you leave journalism?’ The anecdote, taken from Roy Coleman’s obituary (Independent 13 September 1996) reveals a common preconception about the entertainment press: it was a journalistic backwater, a place for fanatics and second-rate journalists, where publishers made easy money. The view misses the significance of a medium where the entertainment industry and the public came together to discuss the creative practices, performances and commercial products of artistes. These journalistic and publishing practices were not performed in isolation: the entertainment press, often implicitly but also knowingly, constructed and represented broader understandings of society, politics and culture.
    • Sustainability awareness, management practices and organisational culture in hotels: Evidence from developing countries

      Oriade, Ade; Osinaike, Adesola; Aduhene, Ken; Wang, Yong (Elsevier, 2020-11-02)
      The subject of sustainability and it its management in the hotel context is somewhat volatile with varied evidence in support of different viewpoints. This study, adopting Situated Cognition (SC), explores the role of organisational culture in sustainability practice and awareness among hotel practitioners. The findings from this study reveal that management practice of sustainability has strong relationship with both organisational culture and employees’ sustainability awareness. However, organisational culture only mediates the relationship between sustainability awareness and management on country to country basis. The study recommends that owner-managers need to realise the importance of building up a robust organisational culture particularly in support of their sustainability management and empowerment of their staff.