Recent Submissions

  • Interpreting in international sign: decisions of Deaf and non-Deaf interpreters

    Stone, Christopher; Russell, Debra; Costello, Brendan; Thumann, Mary; Shaw, Risa (WASLI, 2013)
    The professional use of Deaf Interpreters (DIs) is increasing in several countries and across several contexts. However, there have been few studies that have explored the nature of the work when it involves a Deaf and nondeaf interpreting team. The current study examined the work of two teams of Deaf/non-deaf interpreters providing service in a conference setting. The participants were videotaped while providing service in order to examine the linguistic decisions made by non-deaf interpreters acting as a natural signed language feed, the linguistic decisions made by Deaf interpreters working into International Sign (IS), as well as the meta-communication strategies the team used while constructing the interpretation. The data suggest that interpreting teams that are more familiar with each other rely on different strategies when chunking information, asking for feeds, and for making accommodations. There also appear to be significant differences in the work when the two interpreters share a common natural signed language. All of the data analyzed thus far offer insight into the nature of the relationship and may provide guidance to those arranging interpreting services for international events.
  • A deaf translation norm?

    Stone, Christopher; Bielsa, Esperança (Routledge, 2021-10-29)
  • Terrorism

    Kassimeris, George; Featherstone, Kevin; Sotiropoulos, Dimitri A.; University of Wolverhampton (Oxford University Press, 2020-10-08)
    The chapter places Greek terrorism in a broader political and cultural perspective in order to explain why it has become a permanent fixture of Greek contemporary life. Revolutionary terrorism in Greece resulted from a complex series of political conditions and longstanding cultural influences that drew politically active individuals towards the utopian world of revolutionary protest and violence. These conditions and influences provided the foundations upon which extreme Left terrorism took firm root in the mid-1970s and are analysed in depth and placed within the wider context of the evolution of the Greek political culture within the last forty years, especially the years following the Civil War and the collapse of the Colonels’ dictatorial regime in 1974. The chapter also brings up to date the trajectory of Greek terrorism, by analysing the country’s new generation of urban guerrilla groups and defining what these new groups and their leaders seek to achieve, what motivates them, and how they compare with their predecessors.
  • Higher education contexts of entrepreneurship education outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Anosike, Uchenna Paschal; Oluwatobi, Stephen (North American Business Press, 2021-06-02)
    Motivated by the growing emphasis to influence young people’s post-study career intentions through entrepreneurship education, particularly in Africa where poverty and conflict have been associated with high youth unemployment, this paper articulates the effect of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurial intention amongst students and graduates from two higher education institutions in conflict-torn northern Nigeria. By relying on systematic analysis following semi-structured interviews, the findings showed that newly acquired knowledge and skills in use of market intelligence, business plan writing and record-keeping were not only linked with entrepreneurial intentions, but it also emerged that the volatile context of the business environment influenced strategic decisions related to new business growth and survival. Research and policy implications were considered based on the findings.
  • Neutral is the new blind: calling for gender segregated evidence in UK legislative inquiries regarding the music industries

    Potocnik, Metka (Law Research Centre, University of Wolverhampton, 2021-12-31)
    In late 2020, the Government responded to the enormous crisis in the UK music industries, caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, by several legislative inquiries, aimed at reviewing the rules regulating the industry, including rules on commercialisation of intellectual property (IP). The aim of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) inquiries is purportedly to improve the fairness and viability of the sector, which was devastated by the pandemic. At the same time, the Covid-19 crisis served as a catalyst to expose the pre-existing inequalities and unfairness in the music industries. This article explores the path of the UK DCMS 2020-21 legislative inquiry into the Economics of Music Streaming as a case study to the current approach in UK regulation of the music industries. Informed by the feminist theory of relational legal feminism and embedded in the broader framework of IP Social Justice theory, the author argues that the current approach to legislative inquiries is incomplete, because it fails to take into account the systemic barriers faced by women (i.e. all who identify as women), including gender minority musicians in the sector. The evidence collected fails to investigate the lived experience of women, to the detriment of the fairness of the overall proposal of future reform.
  • What I have learned about countering terrorism in the UK: a conversation with Robert Spencer

    Kassimeris, G (Routledge, 2021-01-21)
    Bob Spencer served as senior investigating officer and a specialist senior investigating officer for terrorism for the West Midlands Police in the U.K. Almost immediately after the 7/7 attacks in London, he was made Head of Intelligence for the West Midlands CTU. West Midlands being assessed at the time to have had the highest terrorism threat in the U.K. outside the capital, Spencer was invited to head the delivery of the governments Prevent agenda within the Regional Counter Terrorism Unit, with responsibility for embedding the strategy across four regional forces. Spencer retired from the force in 2012 but continued to advise various organizations around their compliance with terrorism regulations and particularly their organizational security and preparedness. In June 2016, he was appointed the Prevent Coordinator for Walsall Council in the West Midlands, retiring from the role in 2019.
  • Evaluating the antecedents of health destination loyalty: The moderating role of destination trust and tourists’ emotions

    Elbaz, Ahmed Mohamed; Kamar, Mahmoud Sayed Abou; Onjewu, Adah-Kole Emmanuel; Soliman, Mohammad (Taylor & Francis, 2021-06-02)
    Although the customer experience-satisfaction nexus is a highly developed body of work in the wider literature, this link has scarcely been explored in health tourism. Accordingly, this paper aims to assess the dimensions of health services experiences leading to tourists’ satisfaction and the moderating role of trust and emotions in the link between satisfaction and destination loyalty. A PLS-SEM is employed to analyze data from a sample of 225 health tourists in Egypt. The results show that health tourism experiences dimensions significantly affect tourists’ satisfaction, which in turn positively impacts their loyalty. Additionally, destination trust and emotions moderate the connection between satisfaction and loyalty. Theoretical contributions arise for scholars and practical ramifications are presented for service providers and stakeholders in the Egyptian health tourism scene.
  • Exposing gender bias in intellectual property law: the UK music industries

    Potocnik, Metka; Mtima, Lateef; Jamar, Steven D (Cambridge University Press, 2021-12-31)
  • The effect of entrepreneurship education on nascent entrepreneurship

    Onjewu, Adah-Kole Emmanuel; Haddoud, Mohamed Yacine; Nowiński, Witold (SAGE, 2021-04-28)
    The literature has been enriched by studies examining the effect of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurial or goal intention. Yet, few articles have considered how entrepreneurship education affects nascent entrepreneurship as a more sought-after outcome. Similarly, some scholars assess entrepreneurship education as an aggregate rather than a multidimensional construct comprised of alternative methods with peculiar characteristics yielding distinct student outcomes. Possibly, the present shortage of specificity in the investigation of methods in entrepreneurship education reduces empirical understanding of efficacious teaching and learning modes for optimising entrepreneurial behaviour. Hence, by way of contribution, this inquiry isolates and measures the direct effect of courses, workshops, guest speakers and simulations on new venture creation among UK students. It also measures indirect influence in the same relationships, with self-efficacy as a mediator. A structural equation analysis is performed and the findings show that discretely, in this order, simulations, workshops and courses stimulate nascent entrepreneurship. However, there is particular insignificance in the direct link between guest speakers and nascent entrepreneurship, and further dissociation in the indirect link between workshops and simulations leading to self-efficacy. Theoretical implications arise for future correlation and configurational studies, as well as practical ramifications for entrepreneurship education practitioners, simulation developers and public institutions.
  • Can cruise services satisfy Chinese outbound travelers? An importance–performance analysis

    Kong, Haiyan; Okumus, Fevzi; Rahimi, Roya; Bu, Naipeng; Yin, Zihan (Routledge, 2021-02-26)
    This study aims to explore tourists’ satisfaction with cruise services and the gap between expectation and satisfaction, focusing on Chinese outbound tourists traveling to South Korea. Using a mixed-methods approach, in-depth interviews were conducted to summarize items of cruise services for measurement; importance–performance analysis was performed to simultaneously examine the matching degree between tourists’ perceived importance and performance. Tourists’ expectation is measured by the side of importance, meanwhile, performance represents their satisfaction. This study suggests that cruising is an important way for Chinese tourists to travel abroad, and tourists were generally satisfied with the services provided by immigration, customs, and the cruises. However, a gap remains between the perceived expectation and satisfaction. In terms of cruise service, the most important item was the good language and communication skills of the staff, and the most satisfactory performance was the effective boarding service. The biggest gap was observed in the effective service of handling ticket bookings, cancellations, and confirmations. The results of this study can provide insight into enhancing cruise services and marketing, specifically for companies working with the Chinese market.
  • A qualitative study on the experiences and challenges of MBA students’ engagement with a business research methods module

    Nzekwe-Excel, Chinny (Emerald, 2021-12-31)
    Undertaking research as part of a business degree qualification undoubtedly enables students to develop practical and life-long skills. Nevertheless, students seem to find it challenging undertaking a research project. This study set out to explore the experiences of a group of MBA students who recently undertook their business and management research projects as part of their MBA degree program. The study was carried out in a UK Higher Education Institution and is based on an MBA Business and Management Research Module. The purpose of the module is to enable learners to develop advancedlevel independent research and critical problem-solving skills within a business context. The study adopted a qualitative approach to capture a broad mix of students’ experiences and perceptions on the Module. The sample includes previous MBA students on different cohorts, and different nationalities. Outcomes of the study show that though students are stretched in the business and management project process, they develop a diversity of skills required in the workplace while conducting their projects. The study findings also show that the practical implications of the students’ projects and progressive support from their Project Supervisors contribute to the successful completion of their projects and subsequent attainment of their MBA degree. Outcomes of this study further reveal that undertaking business and management projects creates a rewarding learning experience for learners/students, develops confident graduates, as well as enables effective applications of theory into practice.
  • Tackling the global challenge of illegal wildlife trafficking and trade

    Mbzibain, Aurelian; Mohsen Mohamed, Habiba (University of Wolverhampton Centre for International Development & Training (CIDT), 2020-09-09)
  • Experiences from frontline forest communities: Covid-19 impacts on indigenous peoples and local communities, women and forest and wildlife illegality in the Congo Basin

    Mbzibain, Aurelian; Mohsen Mohamed, Habiba; Baur, Daniela; Jara Cazares, Cristina (The University of Wolverhampton, Centre for International Development and Training (CIDT), 2021-01-27)
  • Job stress and employee outcomes: employment practices in a charity

    Wang, Wen; Seifert, Roger (Emerald Publishing, 2021-03-19)
    Design/methodology/approach We collected both quantitative (through a staff survey and administrative records of sick leave in the previous 12 months) and qualitative data (through interviews and focus groups) from one branch of an internationally well-established and UK-based religious charity between 2017 and 2018. Purpose The study intends to examine employee relations with a changing workforce resulting from the business-like transformation in the charity sector. We investigated sector-specific employment practices which can alleviate job stress (as a given and which has been made worse by the transformation). Developed from the intrinsic and extrinsic motivation framework, the findings can inform human resource management practices in its new efficiency-seeking business model. Findings The quantitative results support a strong mediating effect of job satisfaction between job stress and staff sick leave. The negative correlation shown between job stress and job satisfaction is subject to paid staff perception of meaningful work and their level of involvement in decisionmaking, with the latter having a stronger moderating effect. The qualitative data provides further contextualized evidence on the findings. Practical implications It is important for charities to uphold and reflect their charitable mission towards beneficiaries and paid staff during the shift to an efficiency-seeking business model. Charities should involve their new professional workforce in strategic decision-making to better shape a context-based operational model. Originality/value The study examined employee relations in the nonprofit charity sector with a changing workforce during the transition to a more business-oriented model. In particular, we revealed sector-specific factors that can moderate the association between job stress and absenteeism, and thereby contribute to the understanding of HRM practices in the sector.
  • Toward an e-commerce strategy: Impact of family dynamics

    Tomaselli, Salvo; Wang, Yong; Caspertz, Donella; Pei, Rong (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021-03-05)
  • Fit to be president: William Howard Taft, sports and athleticism

    Burns, Adam (Intellect Publishers, 2021-12-31)
    The early twentieth century was a time when the US public consciousness recognized an increasing association between their political leaders and sports and athleticism. With an exceptional precedent for this connection set by Theodore Roosevelt (1901–1909), his replacement as US president would inevitably find it hard to keep pace. In the modern-day popular consciousness, Roosevelt’s immediate successor, William Howard Taft (1909–1913), is often noted more for his obesity than for his physical athleticism or sporting prowess. Yet, as this article shows, as Taft moved closer to the White House, the contemporary US press increasingly associated him with sports, and at least the pursuit of physical fitness. In a post-Rooseveltian America, a rise to national political prominence demanded a portrayal of a president’s links to sports and athleticism, even in the unlikeliest of candidates.

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