Recent Submissions

  • NGO-state relations in the monitoring of illegal forest logging and wildlife trafficking in Central Africa

    Mbzibain, Aurelian; Tchoudjen, Teodyl Nkuintchua (Elsevier, 2021-08-28)
    Independent forest monitoring (IFM) by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) emerged in the late 1990s as a forest governance mechanism in response to rising forest crime in Asia and Central Africa. IFM is the use of an independent third party that, by agreement or not with state authorities, provides an assessment of legal compliance, and observation of and guidance on official forest law enforcement systems. The success of IFM by NGOs is therefore, inextricably linked to the nature of the relationship with state authorities yet this relationship has neither been explored nor understood. There is scant empirical research on this mechanism globally. This paper addresses these gaps through participatory observation, documentary analysis and interviews with leaders of five NGOs at the forefront of forest and wildlife monitoring in Central Africa. Using Najam (2000) 4-C framework, we find complex and fluid relationships ranging from cooperation, complementarity, confrontation and instrumentalization. Complementarity and confrontation emerge as the most important relationship types while cooperation is the least prevalent relationship. In response to challenges in the relationships, NGOs use a repertoire of strategies and tactics to influence the state in pursuit of their goals. Unfortunately, significant dependence on a limited stream of intermittent external donor funding and lack of clearly articulated influence and advocacy strategies, limit the potential contribution of IFM to the fight against forest and wildlife crime in Central Africa. The implications for IFM organisations, national governments and donor agencies are discussed.
  • Environmental commitment and innovation as catalysts for export performance in family firms

    Haddoud, Mohamed Yacine; Onjewu, Adah-Kole Emmanuel; Nowiński, Witold (Elsevier, 2021-08-31)
    Recognizing the extent of inconclusive findings in the environmental commitment – export performance nexus, this study examines this link in order to reduce theoretical ambiguity. The paper focuses on family firms in Poland and assesses the distinct rate of export intensity resulting from strategic commitment to environmental issues, through product innovation and process innovation. Analyzing a sample of 409 firms sourced from the World Bank Enterprise Survey database, the results indicate that strategic commitment to environmental issues encourages process innovation but not product innovation. In turn, process innovation increases export intensity while product innovation does not. It is also found that quality certifications interact with the relationship between strategic commitment to environmental issues and product innovation. These findings pose important theoretical implications and offer insights to stakeholders particularly interested in the sustainable practices of family firms.
  • Central bank digital currency: What is it and why now?

    Barnes, Matthew (Thomson Reuters, 2021-09-01)
    A central bank digital currency ( CBDC) is electronic in nature and one which amounts to the currency of the country implementing it. The value of a CBDC is the same as the physical form, i.e. a £10 CBDC would equate to a £10 bank note. It is not classed as a cryptocurrency, which is a form of digital currency, however, the Bank of England has said that it may use the distributed ledger technology ( DLT) which is utilised for cryptocurrency. Central banks are researching into the benefits and implications of a CBDC, such as making payments more resilient and faster, and adapting to the digital economy. Cynically, it appears that central banks are concerned by the potential of cryptocurrencies becoming mainstream and making central banks redundant. This article will explore the following: what is a CBDC, why is it being explored now and the future of money and payment services.
  • Weaving through the web: How students navigate information online in the twenty-first century

    Bailey, C; Bowley, H; Withers, J; Bartram, Brendan (Routledge, 2020-10-30)
    This chapter investigates the processes students employ when searching online for information to include in an academic essay. Against a backdrop of literature from the past three decades, we present findings from a recent observational study (employing screen-recording software and stimulated recall) of how students approach a writing-from-sources task, supplemented by interviews with librarians at a post-1992 UK university. We discuss three aspects of our participants’ search for sources: where they searched, how they searched and which sources they selected. Our participants displayed a wide range of skill levels and approaches to searching, and in some cases a high degree of persistence. We highlight the information literacy challenges they faced, and suggest how some of these could be addressed.
  • Participatory co-design and normalisation process theory with staff and patients to implement digital ways of working into routine care: the example of electronic patient-reported outcomes in UK renal services

    Knowles, SE; Ercia, A; Caskey, F; Rees, M; Farrington, K; van der Veer, SN (BMC, 2021-07-18)
    Background: Successful implementation of digital health systems requires contextually sensitive solutions. Working directly with system users and drawing on implementation science frameworks are both recommended. We sought to combine Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) with participatory co-design methods, to work with healthcare stakeholders to generate implementation support recommendations for a new electronic patient reported outcome measure (ePRO) in renal services. ePROs collect data on patient-reported symptom burden and illness experience overtime, requiring sustained engagement and integration into existing systems. Methods: We identified co-design methods that could be mapped to NPT constructs to generate relevant qualitative data. Patients and staff from three renal units in England participated in empathy and process mapping activities to understand ‘coherence’ (why the ePRO should be completed) and ‘cognitive participation’ (who would be involved in collecting the ePRO). Observation of routine unit activity was completed to understand ‘collective action’ (how the collection of ePRO could integrate with service routines). Results: The mapping activities and observation enabled the research team to become more aware of the key needs of both staff and patients. Working within sites enabled us to consider local resources and barriers. This produced ‘core and custom’ recommendations specifying core needs that could be met with customised local solutions. We identified two over-arching themes which need to be considered when introducing new digital systems (1) That data collection is physical (electronic systems need to fit into physical spaces and routines), and (2) That data collection is intentional (system users must be convinced of the value of collecting the data). Conclusions: We demonstrate that NPT constructs can be operationalised through participatory co-design to work with stakeholders and within settings to collaboratively produce implementation support recommendations. This enables production of contextually sensitive implementation recommendations, informed by qualitative evidence, theory, and stakeholder input. Further longitudinal evaluation is necessary to determine how successful the recommendations are in practice.
  • Shadow banking: The next financial crisis?

    Barnes, Matthew (Thomson Reuters - Sweet & Maxwell, 2021-03-31)
    Shadow banking plays an integral part in modern day banking and finance. However, shadow banking is not a modern concept, in fact, it has existed for many years when considering credit outside of banking institutions. Shadow banking was coined around the time of the global financial crisis 2007-2009, but the roots of such run far deeper than this time period. This paper will discuss credit outside of the traditional banking system, shadow banking and the global financial crisis focusing on securitisation, and prominently how shadow banking may be the catalyst for the next financial crisis with a focus on China where it appears rife.
  • The end of meaningful work in charities? A case study of ethics in employee relations

    Wang, Wen; Seifert, Roger (Springer, 2021-07-12)
    Developed from meaningful work and business ethics, we investigate the motivational effect of meaningful work on paid staff (not volunteers) with a “shortage” of ethical employment practices situated in the Not-for-Profit sector. We tested the traditional notion of meaningful work by nature and by line manager support (under its business-like practices) to compensate for the “sacrifice” (low pay and job stress caused by poor employment terms) of front line staff working alongside professional managers paid the market rate. Using a mixed-method case study, we employed SEM modelling to analyse a staff survey of 125 valid responses and administrative records of staff resignation, alongside interviews. The results show that meaningful work by nature and by line manager support are positively and significantly associated with job satisfaction but neither has a significant effect on staff resignation action. There is no empirical evidence to support the compensating effect of meaningful work by nature; meaningful work by line manager support has a stronger effect only through reduced job stress, rather than compensating for the low pay, in preventing resignation. The qualitative analysis reveals that continued low pay and using precarious employment contracts have evoked the questioning of ethics of employment practices in this sector. We discuss the implications and suggest further areas of research.
  • Coronavirus: what now for the global economy and financial markets?

    Barnes, Matthew (Law Research Centre, University of Wolverhampton, 2020-12-11)
    The novel coronavirus has spread exponentially across the globe impacting many aspects of life and it continues to do so at an alarming pace. There are several concerns that stem from this pandemic such as when a vaccine will become available and the impact that it will have on human life. While the paramount concern is, without doubt, to conserve and protect life, there are other implications that should be acknowledged of which this paper is directed toward; the economy and financial markets. This paper will take a two-pronged approach focusing on the effects of the economy and financial markets; and looking to the future. Therefore, the focus of this paper is to illustrate the effects on the economy and financial markets during the beginning and heightened stage of the pandemic, including an up-to-date account, in three large economies, namely the UK, US and Japan. This will be followed by an observation of what the future holds taking into account financial stimulus packages, financial markets and the potential for financial crises. Data, literature and commentary from Governments, global organisations and other key entities will be included.
  • Introduction

    Stylos, Nikolaos; Rahimi, Roya; Okumus, Bendegul; Williams, Sarah; Rahimi, Roya; Stylos, Nikolaos; Okumus, Bendegul; Williams, Sarah (Springer Nature, 2021-06-01)
  • Changing the rules of the game in academic publishing: three scenarios in the field of management research

    Brabet, Julienne; Ozbilgin, Mustafa; Yamak, Sibel (Inderscience, 2021-09)
    The field of academic publishing is under multiple pressures to transform as it suffers from crises of confidence partly due to the mass marketisation, deterioration of relevance and decline of collaborative scientific ethos that it has experienced. The paper offers a provocation based on a multilevel analysis of the present academic (business) model of knowledge production and dissemination, and its consequences. It then presents three alternative futuristic scenarios. The first one is based on a fully commercialized approach to publishing. The second scenario promotes an open science approach and the third one explores a complete overhaul of our current approach to management research. The paper has implications for governance of the field of publishing in management research into the future and aims to alert the actors in the sector to the vices of the mass marketisation of academic publishing.
  • Interpreting in international sign: decisions of Deaf and non-Deaf interpreters

    Stone, Christopher; Russell, Debra; Costello, Brendan; Thumann, Mary; Shaw, Risa (WASLI, 2011)
    The professional use of Deaf Interpreters (DIs) is increasing in several countries and across several contexts. However, there have been few studies that have explored the nature of the work when it involves a Deaf and nondeaf interpreting team. The current study examined the work of two teams of Deaf/non-deaf interpreters providing service in a conference setting. The participants were videotaped while providing service in order to examine the linguistic decisions made by non-deaf interpreters acting as a natural signed language feed, the linguistic decisions made by Deaf interpreters working into International Sign (IS), as well as the meta-communication strategies the team used while constructing the interpretation. The data suggest that interpreting teams that are more familiar with each other rely on different strategies when chunking information, asking for feeds, and for making accommodations. There also appear to be significant differences in the work when the two interpreters share a common natural signed language. All of the data analyzed thus far offer insight into the nature of the relationship and may provide guidance to those arranging interpreting services for international events.
  • A deaf translation norm?

    Stone, Christopher; Bielsa, Esperança (Routledge, 2021-10-29)
  • Terrorism

    Kassimeris, George; Featherstone, Kevin; Sotiropoulos, Dimitri A.; University of Wolverhampton (Oxford University Press, 2020-10-08)
    The chapter places Greek terrorism in a broader political and cultural perspective in order to explain why it has become a permanent fixture of Greek contemporary life. Revolutionary terrorism in Greece resulted from a complex series of political conditions and longstanding cultural influences that drew politically active individuals towards the utopian world of revolutionary protest and violence. These conditions and influences provided the foundations upon which extreme Left terrorism took firm root in the mid-1970s and are analysed in depth and placed within the wider context of the evolution of the Greek political culture within the last forty years, especially the years following the Civil War and the collapse of the Colonels’ dictatorial regime in 1974. The chapter also brings up to date the trajectory of Greek terrorism, by analysing the country’s new generation of urban guerrilla groups and defining what these new groups and their leaders seek to achieve, what motivates them, and how they compare with their predecessors.
  • Higher education contexts of entrepreneurship education outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Anosike, Uchenna Paschal; Oluwatobi, Stephen (North American Business Press, 2021-06-02)
    Motivated by the growing emphasis to influence young people’s post-study career intentions through entrepreneurship education, particularly in Africa where poverty and conflict have been associated with high youth unemployment, this paper articulates the effect of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurial intention amongst students and graduates from two higher education institutions in conflict-torn northern Nigeria. By relying on systematic analysis following semi-structured interviews, the findings showed that newly acquired knowledge and skills in use of market intelligence, business plan writing and record-keeping were not only linked with entrepreneurial intentions, but it also emerged that the volatile context of the business environment influenced strategic decisions related to new business growth and survival. Research and policy implications were considered based on the findings.
  • Neutral is the new blind: calling for gender segregated evidence in UK legislative inquiries regarding the music industries

    Potocnik, Metka (Law Research Centre, University of Wolverhampton, 2021-08-16)
    In late 2020, the Government responded to the enormous crisis in the UK music industries, caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, by several legislative inquiries, aimed at reviewing the rules regulating the industry, including rules on commercialisation of intellectual property (IP). The aim of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) inquiries is purportedly to improve the fairness and viability of the sector, which was devastated by the pandemic. At the same time, the Covid-19 crisis served as a catalyst to expose the pre-existing inequalities and unfairness in the music industries. This article explores the path of the UK DCMS 2020-21 legislative inquiry into the Economics of Music Streaming as a case study to the current approach in UK regulation of the music industries. Informed by the feminist theory of relational legal feminism and embedded in the broader framework of IP Social Justice theory, the author argues that the current approach to legislative inquiries is incomplete, because it fails to take into account the systemic barriers faced by women (i.e. all who identify as women), including gender minority musicians in the sector. The evidence collected fails to investigate the lived experience of women, to the detriment of the fairness of the overall proposal of future reform.
  • What I have learned about countering terrorism in the UK: a conversation with Robert Spencer

    Kassimeris, G (Routledge, 2021-01-21)
    Bob Spencer served as senior investigating officer and a specialist senior investigating officer for terrorism for the West Midlands Police in the U.K. Almost immediately after the 7/7 attacks in London, he was made Head of Intelligence for the West Midlands CTU. West Midlands being assessed at the time to have had the highest terrorism threat in the U.K. outside the capital, Spencer was invited to head the delivery of the governments Prevent agenda within the Regional Counter Terrorism Unit, with responsibility for embedding the strategy across four regional forces. Spencer retired from the force in 2012 but continued to advise various organizations around their compliance with terrorism regulations and particularly their organizational security and preparedness. In June 2016, he was appointed the Prevent Coordinator for Walsall Council in the West Midlands, retiring from the role in 2019.

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