Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPadmanabhan, Hari
dc.contributor.authorWidlak, Monika
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.contributor.authorMcKaig, Brian
dc.contributor.authorBrookes, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorVeitch, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T13:56:43Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-21T13:56:43Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-11
dc.identifier.citationPadmanabhan H., Widlak M., Nevill A., McKaig B., Brookes M., Veitch A. (2015) 'Ethnic variation in colorectal cancer risk following a positive faecal occult blood test in an English bowel cancer screening programme centre', European Journal of Gastroenterol & Hepatology, 27 (11) pp. 1281-5. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000443
dc.identifier.issn1473-5687
dc.identifier.pmid26267240
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MEG.0000000000000443
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/575453
dc.description.abstractThe literature on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and ethnic diversity is dominated by studies from the USA. There are no such published data from the UK bowel cancer screening programme (BCSP) population. The Wolverhampton Bowel Cancer Screening Centre serves a population of 900 000 in the Black Country and South Staffordshire. South Asians (SA) comprise 9% of the population. We aimed to determine the effects of ethnicity and sex on the risk for cancer or adenoma detected by colonoscopy following a positive faecal occult blood test over a 5-year period (2007-2011).
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.subjectadenoma
dc.subjectbowel cancer screening
dc.subjectcolorectal cancer
dc.subjectethnicity
dc.subjectsex
dc.subjectSouth Asian
dc.titleEthnic variation in colorectal cancer risk following a positive faecal occult blood test in an English bowel cancer screening programme centre
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
dc.source.volume27
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.beginpage1281
dc.source.endpage1285
html.description.abstractThe literature on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and ethnic diversity is dominated by studies from the USA. There are no such published data from the UK bowel cancer screening programme (BCSP) population. The Wolverhampton Bowel Cancer Screening Centre serves a population of 900 000 in the Black Country and South Staffordshire. South Asians (SA) comprise 9% of the population. We aimed to determine the effects of ethnicity and sex on the risk for cancer or adenoma detected by colonoscopy following a positive faecal occult blood test over a 5-year period (2007-2011).


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record