• A Critical Minefield: the Haunting of the Welsh Working Class Novel

      Byrne, Aidan; Sheppard, Lisa; Goodridge, John; Keegan, Bridget (Cambridge University Press, 2016)
      A History of British Working-Class Literature examines the rich contributions of working-class writers in Great Britain from 1700 to the present. Since the early eighteenth century the phenomenon of working-class writing has been recognised, but almost invariably co-opted in some ultimately distorting manner, whether as examples of 'natural genius'; a Victorian self-improvement ethic; or as an aspect of the heroic workers of nineteenth- and twentieth-century radical culture. The present work contrastingly applies a wide variety of interpretive approaches to this literature. Essays on more familiar topics, such as the 'agrarian idyll' of John Clare, are mixed with entirely new areas in the field like working-class women's 'life-narratives'. This authoritative and comprehensive History explores a wide range of genres such as travel writing, the verse-epistle, the elegy and novels, while covering aspects of Welsh, Scottish, Ulster/Irish culture and transatlantic perspectives.
    • A Critical Minefield: the Haunting of the Welsh Working Class Novel

      Byrne, Aidan; Sheppard, Lisa; Goodridge, John; Keegan, Bridget (Cambridge University Press, 2017-04-30)
      A History of British Working-Class Literature examines the rich contributions of working-class writers in Great Britain from 1700 to the present. Since the early eighteenth century the phenomenon of working-class writing has been recognised, but almost invariably co-opted in some ultimately distorting manner, whether as examples of 'natural genius'; a Victorian self-improvement ethic; or as an aspect of the heroic workers of nineteenth- and twentieth-century radical culture. The present work contrastingly applies a wide variety of interpretive approaches to this literature. Essays on more familiar topics, such as the 'agrarian idyll' of John Clare, are mixed with entirely new areas in the field like working-class women's 'life-narratives'. This authoritative and comprehensive History explores a wide range of genres such as travel writing, the verse-epistle, the elegy and novels, while covering aspects of Welsh, Scottish, Ulster/Irish culture and transatlantic perspectives.
    • A Man Out of Time: Joseph, Time and Space in the Marian Plays of the N-Town Manuscript

      Black, Daisy; Cox, Elizabeth; McAvoy, Liz Herbert; Magnani, Roberta (D. S. Brewer, 2015-05-31)
    • “A Music Video is Simply a Promo for a Song”: Music Video as Documentary

      Halligan, Benjamin; Heinze, Carsten; Niebling, Laura (Springer, 2015-10)
    • Abject Spaces in The Bridge and The Killing: The Post-9/11 City of Scandinavian Noir’

      Pheasant-Kelly, Frances; Wilhite, Keith (Fairleigh Dickinson Press, 2016-05)
      This chapter is from a book which analyzes post-9/11 literature, film, and television through an interdisciplinary lens, taking into account contemporary debates about spatial practices, gentrification, cosmopolitanism, memory and history, nostalgia, the uncanny and the abject, postmodern virtuality, the politics of realism, and the economic and social life of cities. Featuring an international group of scholars, the volume theorizes how literary and visual representations expose the persistent conflicts that arise as cities rebuild in the shadow of past ruins.
    • Afterword: Confidence in art evidence

      Prior, Ross W.; Rowe, Nick; Reason, Matthew; Balfour, Michael; Preston, Sheila (Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2017)
      In pointing to the fact that there are no fixed prescriptions for what constitutes evidence and impact in applied arts, art (meaning all art forms) is offered as a way of providing those answers. Personal embodied ways of knowing are of interest to researchers and values the importance of knowledge that is incrementally gained through the act of doing and being. Art is empirical – art and art processes are observable. Art is a way of knowing and as such provides researchers with a rich vehicle for research that does not need to be scientific or rely on the social sciences. Whilst mixed methods research may be useful, applied arts researchers can and should have full confidence in using an art based research method. This should also extend to a confidence in artistic outcomes, offering us clear understandings of both evidence and impact.
    • Afterword: towards a future paradigm

      Prior, Ross W; Mateus-Berr, Ruth; Jochum, Richard (De Gruyter, 2020-05-01)
      The use of art as research has greatly matured, and, despite the current preoccupation with measurement in the education sector, artistic research has continued to gain acceptance as a legitimate methodology for artists. Yet art-based research is still not completely and universally embedded within higher education learning and teaching approaches. The field’s continued lack of confidence in using art as a vehicle of research is one reason. There is a need to stop relying upon other disciplines to justify the power of art. If we acknowledge that words cannot always reveal the uniquely felt qualities of art, then we cannot persist in using words as exclusive modes of research. Personal, embodied ways of knowing are of interest to researchers, and values the importance of knowledge that is incrementally gained through the act of doing and being. However, art is empirical—art and art processes are observable and can be entwined throughout the art-making process as a methodology of inquiry. Proposed here, as a future paradigm, is the threefold primacy of art in research, learning and teaching—positioning art as the topic, process and outcome of research. Significantly art as research recognizes art objects as full participants and uses art as its evidence.
    • Always on: Capitalist continuity and Its discontents

      Penzin, Alexei; Kholeif, Omar; Sarkisov, Karen (Prestel Publishing, 2019-09-03)
      Why should we critically reflect on continuity today? To immediately address the central point, it suffices to invoke the issues and standpoints that occupy radical theorists today, such as the direct, impassionate question, When and how will capitalism finally end? Another widespread articulation of the same concern would range from the different obscure claims about “living in the end times,” stemming from politico-eschatological perspectives of capitalism’s self-destructiveness, to hard evidence of disaster capitalism’s devastation and destabilization of the natural world. In a less theoretical but more pointed form, this central concern has been echoed in people’s responses to the greedy, cynical warmongering of recent times, new right-wing populist deceptions of the dispossessed masses, and the incredible burgeoning of inequality worldwide. These versions of desperate wondering could be summed up in the question, When will this massive, repetitive absurdity end? Today, this end is imagined in less utopian, inspiring shapes than before, ranging from explosive, unpredictable technological acceleration, random catastrophes, and ecological disaster to more sober discussions about the opportunities for a renewed radical politics.
    • An 'Individual Learning Profile' (ILP)

      Salter, Pam; Peacock, Diane (University of Wolverhampton, 2001)
      A short diagnostic learning support questionnaire was designed and issued to ascertain individual and generic levels of key skills of all incoming level 1 students in the School of Art and Design (SAD). This was completed at induction with the intention of providing an indication of an ‘Individual Learning Profile’ (ILP) for each student. It was anticipated that the ILP would assist both staff and students in their understanding of their strengths and weaknesses and how best they might achieve their potential. It would also indicate at the earliest opportunity the need to implement support for study. Recent emphasis upon widening access into Higher Education (HE) has highlighted variations in student profiles. The very terms non-standard entry, mature, returner, disadvantaged, precede the notion of concealed social and educational inequality. Primary concerns centre upon lack of IT skills and the number of students with dyslexic difficulties in the School. Early identification of students requiring and/or requesting help, and those ‘at risk’, is expected to be ‘cost-effective’ for all concerned. The ILP is intended to underpin the goal of achieving true equal opportunity for learning, in addition to maximising student retention and achievement across the School. Initial research into the development of the Individual Learning Profiles (ILP’s) centred upon the need for a brief overview from each student rather that detailed information, which, if necessary, could be extended later during individual counselling. Reference to previous models of good practice included the work undertaken in other UK HE Institutions, in particular that of De Montfort University (DMU) who were contacted (June 2000) in relation to their HEFCE funded work on a national Key Skills survey of entrants.
    • An evaluation of the module guides and assignment briefs used in the School of Art and Design (SAD)

      Scull, Paul (University of Wolverhampton, 2001)
      At the beginning of the 1999/2000 academic year, the School of Art and Design at the University of Wolverhampton introduced all students to new module guides. The aim of this project was to evaluate the module guides and assignment briefs currently used in the School of Art and Design and to propose any modifications. In particular, the objectives were to identify key issues and constraints by means of a literature review; to identify and use methods by which relevant, reliable and unbiased information might be gathered; evaluate collected information; identify aspects of the guides and briefs which might benefit from changes as well as aspects of good practice. Although originally identified as an ‘innovation’ bid, the innovation (the introduction of new module guides and assignment briefs) had already taken place. The primary concern of this project was therefore to review the innovation.
    • An investigation into the concept of mind mapping and the use of mind mapping software to support and improve student academic performance.

      Holland, Brian; Holland, Lynda; Davies, Jenny (University of Wolverhampton, 2004)
      This project set out to investigate if the technique of mind mapping could be used to improve the study and planning skills of second year Digital Media students from the School of Art and Design (SAD) and first year students on the History of Computing module from the School of Computing and Information Technology (SCIT). Both sets of students were shown how mind mapping could be used to plan the different types of work that they needed to undertake for their modules. MindManager software was installed in selected computer labs and the students were given tuition on how to use the software.
    • Art as the topic, process and outcome of research within higher education

      W. Prior, Ross; McNiff, Shaun (Intellect, 2018-09-07)
      Using Art as Research in Learning and Teaching explores various multidisciplinary visual and performing art forms, including creative writing, as ways to provide a rich contribution and understanding to research, learning, and teaching. Key figures in the field share their art-based research, arts practice, and philosophy, bringing the arts to life within their taught and learned contexts across a variety of art forms and levels of post-compulsory education.
    • Assessing by viva voce

      Callery, Dymphna; Hale, Kate (University of Wolverhampton, 2002)
      The idea of introducing vive voce assessments emerged during a review of the assessment profile of the Drama Department. Despite the practical orientation of the programme, assessments were dominated by 60% Practical Project , 40% Essay weightings. Good practical marks were frequently undermined by weaker grades for written work, despite students’ evident development of understanding through practice, and written evaluations were generally of poor quality. In addition, staff had reported an unhealthy split in the focus of practical modules where written course-work was a requirement. In the drama professions it is more necessary to be able to explain ideas and creative concepts orally and pursue them somatically: the process of making work is physically and vocally-based; critical reflection comes orally too in the form of direction, post-show discussions and de-briefings. Teaching strategies for practical work embrace this, applying theoretical concepts in concrete praxis. Students’ development on such courses requires them to invest in sensory and experiential learning and a progressively intensive approach to practice. Presenting work to tutors and peers for critical feedback is the major teaching and learning mode. Having to change tack and focus on conceptualising theory, rather than exploring through creativity, and essay writing rather than practical skills, constrained tutors and students. The introduction of an oral examination – a viva voce – to assess students’ ability to critically reflect on and evaluate their practice could provide a viable alternative. Viva voces would both acknowledge and play to the strengths of students’ oral communication skills and offer them the chance to develop more formal interview techniques, as well as acknowledging the vocal and oral nature of the discipline. The aim of the project was to introduce viva voce exams as a method of assessing critical reflection on practical work in order primarily to improve the range of asessments, but in addition to give students an opportunity to sustain their achievement on practical modules. The focus was on finding and implementing strategies that would promote good practice in assessment.
    • Assessing Terminology Management Systems for Interpreters

      Costa, Hernani; Durán-Muñoz, Isabel; Corpas Pastor, Gloria (Leiden, Brill, 2017-12-21)
    • Astronauts and Avatars: Travels through the Physical, the Virtual and the Imagined

      Doyle, Denise; Lean, Garth; Staiff, Russell; Waterton, Emma (Berghahn Books, New York & Oxford, 2017-07-01)
      Under the theme of the poetics of travel this chapter explores known and unknown worlds, and real, imagined, and virtual spaces through rethinking the experience of the traveller at the beginning of the twenty-first century. In this we explore the myths and realities of our lives as astronauts and avatars and reflect on the fragility of human existence in extreme spaces. The weaving of real stories and imagined, and the notion of the journey that extends beyond or breaks through cultural boundaries are themes that are explored, along with the insatiable nature of our desire to explore the unknown. In particular are the investigations of travel and new technologies; in this new digital age does the traveller even have to ‘leave’ to experience ‘travelling’ and the exploration of space and place?
    • Automatically marked summative assessment using internet tools

      Penfold, Brian (University of Wolverhampton, 2001)
      With very large groups, individual assessment is becoming increasingly difficult. We are constantly aware of the cost of the time taken in traditional forms of assessment and the effect of marking fatigue on quality. The system described here is a ‘home-grown’ system to present summative multiple-choice question (MCQ) papers in an efficient, cost effective and simple way. The system directly replaces manually marked MCQ tests and because of its nature opens up new more sophisticated multimedia assessment formats.
    • Avatar Lives: Narratives of Transformation and Identity

      Doyle, Denise; Gackenbach, Jayne; Bown, Johnathan (Elsevier Publishers, San Diego, 2017-02)
      A recent UK study forecasting how our identities will change in the following decade noted that until now a kind of inner narrative has provided individuals with an ongoing subjective, internal commentary but through the growth of online social media, identity is ‘no longer an internal, subjective experience, but is constructed externally and therefore is much less robust and more volatile’ (Future Identities, 2013). Arguing from the fields of literature and feminist science studies Susan Merrill Squier observes that ‘no longer stable, the boundaries of our human existence have become imprecise at best, contested at worst’ (Squier, 2004). This chapter concerns itself with digital embodiment and the construction of the self as avatar, and the ways in which contemporary arts practices are emerging through the exploration of digitally constructed realities on new technological platforms. This chapter argues that access to the experience of digitally constructed realities enables us reflect upon how our own privately constructed realities are also created and allows us to shed light on the distinctions between fiction and reality.