Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMacLeod, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorMorris, John
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.contributor.authorSunderland, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-24T19:29:27Z
dc.date.available2009-02-24T19:29:27Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sports Sciences, 27(2): 121-128
dc.identifier.issn02640414
dc.identifier.issn1466447X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640410802422181
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/50593
dc.description.abstractNine games players (mean age 23.3 years, s¼2.8; height 1.73 m, s¼0.08; body mass 70.0 kg, s¼12.7) completed 14 laps of a measured circuit that incorporated intermittent running and directional changes, representative of the movements made by field hockey players during match-play. The distances and speeds recorded by a global positioning satellite (GPS) system (Spi EliteTM) were compared statistically with speed measurements made using timing gates and distances measured using a calibrated trundle wheel, to establish the criterion validity of the GPS system. A validation of the speed of movement of each participant separately was also made, using data from each timing gate, over a range of speeds. The mean distance recorded by the GPS system was 6821 m (s¼7) and the mean speed was 7.0 km h71 (s¼1.9), compared with the actual distance of 6818 m and recorded mean speed of 7.0 km h71 (s¼1.9). Pearson correlations (r) among timing gate speed and GPS speed were 0.99 (P50.001) and the mean difference and 95% limits of agreement were 0.0+0.9 km h71. These results suggest that a GPS system (Spi EliteTM) offers a valid tool for measuring speed and distance during match-play, and can quickly provide the
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis)
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/02640410802422181
dc.subjectTeam sports
dc.subjectPerformance analysis
dc.subjectMatch analysis
dc.subjectSatellite positioning
dc.subjectTeam games
dc.subjectAthletes
dc.subjectField hockey
dc.subjectGPS
dc.subjectSports
dc.titleThe validity of a non-differential global positioning system for assessing player movement patterns in field hockey.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciences
html.description.abstractNine games players (mean age 23.3 years, s¼2.8; height 1.73 m, s¼0.08; body mass 70.0 kg, s¼12.7) completed 14 laps of a measured circuit that incorporated intermittent running and directional changes, representative of the movements made by field hockey players during match-play. The distances and speeds recorded by a global positioning satellite (GPS) system (Spi EliteTM) were compared statistically with speed measurements made using timing gates and distances measured using a calibrated trundle wheel, to establish the criterion validity of the GPS system. A validation of the speed of movement of each participant separately was also made, using data from each timing gate, over a range of speeds. The mean distance recorded by the GPS system was 6821 m (s¼7) and the mean speed was 7.0 km h71 (s¼1.9), compared with the actual distance of 6818 m and recorded mean speed of 7.0 km h71 (s¼1.9). Pearson correlations (r) among timing gate speed and GPS speed were 0.99 (P50.001) and the mean difference and 95% limits of agreement were 0.0+0.9 km h71. These results suggest that a GPS system (Spi EliteTM) offers a valid tool for measuring speed and distance during match-play, and can quickly provide the


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record