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dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Neil
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-15T15:25:40Z
dc.date.available2009-01-15T15:25:40Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 32(3): 271-283.
dc.identifier.issn02602938
dc.identifier.issn1469297X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02602930600896498
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/47532
dc.description.abstractA small-scale action research project was carried out on students' feedback histories on one undergraduate module. Old grades and comment sheets were collected and analysed by staff for recurring advice to individual students on the target module. This advice was then synthesized to create simple individual learning plans for the students' forthcoming assignments, in other words old feedback was applied to a new task. A number of additional teaching and learning interventions were provided for participants and the statistical outcomes showed a small gain in the grades achieved against those who did not participate. Interviews were held with participants that indicated a number of reasons why feedback was not optimized to assist further learning.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLondon: Taylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/02602930600896498
dc.subjectFeed-forward
dc.subjectFeedback
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectLearning
dc.subjectUndergraduate students
dc.subjectStudents
dc.subjectEffectiveness
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectTeacher-pupil relationships
dc.titleFeed-forward: Improving students' use of tutors' comments.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education
html.description.abstractA small-scale action research project was carried out on students' feedback histories on one undergraduate module. Old grades and comment sheets were collected and analysed by staff for recurring advice to individual students on the target module. This advice was then synthesized to create simple individual learning plans for the students' forthcoming assignments, in other words old feedback was applied to a new task. A number of additional teaching and learning interventions were provided for participants and the statistical outcomes showed a small gain in the grades achieved against those who did not participate. Interviews were held with participants that indicated a number of reasons why feedback was not optimized to assist further learning.


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